cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Hospital Photograpy

Kaelicole92
Apprentice
A friend of mine is due with her baby any day now. She wants me to take photos of the birth for her. I have never done them before so I’m looking for help. I have a Canom T6i and would like some help on what settings I should use to get eh best photos. I’d prefer not to use flash. Anything will help please and thank you.
8 REPLIES 8

Ray-uk
Whiz

A lot depends on how much light is available in the room at the time. I would suggest you do a bit of experimentation in your own home under normal artificial light (any subject will do, the birth isn't needed for this).

 

It does depend on which lens you are going to use but as a general guide set your camera to AV mode and your lens aperture to about f5.6, if the displayed shutter speed is less than 1/60 then increase the ISO until it reaches 1/60 or more. Try not to take the ISO higher than necessary otherwise your shots could appear noisy.

 

On the day be prepared to use your flash because you just may not have any choice if the lighting is that poor.


@Ray-uk wrote:

A lot depends on how much light is available in the room at the time. I would suggest you do a bit of experimentation in your own home under normal artificial light (any subject will do, the birth isn't needed for this).

 

It does depend on which lens you are going to use but as a general guide set your camera to AV mode and your lens aperture to about f5.6, if the displayed shutter speed is less than 1/60 then increase the ISO until it reaches 1/60 or more. Try not to take the ISO higher than necessary otherwise your shots could appear noisy.

 

On the day be prepared to use your flash because you just may not have any choice if the lighting is that poor.


My guess is that using flash would be a good way to get yourself thrown out of the delivery room. But doctors working in ORs do like to be able to see what they're doing, so you may find that the light isn't all that bad. But I agree with the others that you may need a faster lens than the kit lens. Maybe you could rent or borrow one.

 

And I'm not sure that Ernie's suggestion to zoom with your feet is a practical one. I suspect that you'll be told where you can stand and expected to stay there until after the baby is born.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

" I suspect that you'll be told where you can stand and expected to stay there until after the baby is born."

 

Nope, not true!  At least in the few (5) cases where I was involved.   You can get it all.  Smiley Indifferent

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

" I suspect that you'll be told where you can stand and expected to stay there until after the baby is born."

 

Nope, not true!  At least in the few (5) cases where I was involved.   You can get it all.  Smiley Indifferent


Well, I'd be inclined to try to stay out of the way of the doctors and nurses. (In the same way that I try to stay out of the way of the official event photographer when he isn't me.)

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

" I'd be inclined to try to stay out of the way of the doctors and nurses."

 

The goal of such is to the record the event. If you are squeamish or feel you are just in the way perhaps you should not offer or take on such an assignment.  I always and have always felt it was my job to get the photos the client wants. I do my best to do so.  If I feel I can't, I don't take the job.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

" I'd be inclined to try to stay out of the way of the doctors and nurses."

 

The goal of such is to the record the event. If you are squeamish or feel you are just in the way perhaps you should not offer or take on such an assignment.  I always and have always felt it was my job to get the photos the client wants. I do my best to do so.  If I feel I can't, I don't take the job.


There's actually a middle ground: find out ahead of time what the rules are regarding a photographer's presence on the OR, and plan your shoot accordingly.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

ebiggs1
Legend

"Anything will help please and thank you."

 

Nobody can tell you what settings to use without seeing the place where the birth will take place.  We can give you some guesses and common settings but without knowing the lighting it is impossible to get specific.

 

"I’d prefer not to use flash."

 

Not only, not prefer to use flash, but don't use flash. Not a good idea at all.

 

You said you have the T6i?  It's a good camera and certainly capable of doing the job.  But I suspect you got the kit lens with it?  EF-S 18-55mm zoom?  It is a drawback because it is so slow.  Which means it needs lots of light for best results.  You may have all the light you need or may not. A good pretty inexpensive lens that would work in very low light and also work well in lots of light is the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens.  However, it does not zoom so you have to do that with your feet!

I would buy one and also take your kit lens, too.  That way you should be covered in either case.

 

I assume you know about ISO setting and such?  Use a higher ISO to start with say about 800 to 1600. Set it down, lower number, that will work and stil give good light results as you shoot.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Waddizzle
Legend

@Kaelicole92 wrote:
A friend of mine is due with her baby any day now. She wants me to take photos of the birth for her. I have never done them before so I’m looking for help. I have a Canom T6i and would like some help on what settings I should use to get eh best photos. I’d prefer not to use flash. Anything will help please and thank you.

I would recommend the EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM lens for use in hospital rooms.  The EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is more of a portrait focal length.  You can always move closer for a portrait with the 24mm.  But, you may not always be able to back up with the 50mm to capture more of a indoor room.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."
Announcements

08/09/2022: New firmware version 1.2.0 is available for CR-N 300
08/09/2022: New firmware version 1.2.0 is available for CR-N 500
07/28/2022: New firmware version 1.2.1 is available for EOS-R3
07/21/2022: New firmware version 1.6.0 is available for EOS-R5
07/21/2022: New firmware version 1.6.0 is available for EOS-R6
07/21/2022: New firmware version 1.1.0 is available for EOS-R7
07/21/2022: New firmware version 1.1.0 is available for EOS-R10
07/14/2022: New firmware version 1.0.1 is available for CR-X300
07/01/2022: New firmware version 1.3.0 is available for PowerShot PICK
06/30/2022: Service Notice: EOS 70D: Error 70 or Error 80
06/10/2022: Service Notice:UPDATE: Canon Inkjet Printer continuous reboot loop or powering down
06/07/2022: New firmware version 1.3.2 is available for PowerShot G7 X Mark III
06/07/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3 is available for EOS M50 Mark II
05/31/2022: Did someone SAY Badges?
05/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.5.1 is available for EOS-C500 Mark II
05/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3.1 is available for EOS-C300 Mark III
05/10/2022: Keep your Canon gear in optimal condition with a Canon Maintenance Service
05/05/2022: We are excited to announce that we have refreshed the ranking scale within the community!
04/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.1.1 is available for EOS R5 C
03/23/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3.1 is available for EOS-C70
02/09/2022: Share Your Photos is back!
02/07/2022: New firmware version 1.6.1 is available for EOS-1DX Mark III
01/19/2022: READY FOR ANYTHING EOS-R5 C
01/13/2022: Community Update. We will be retiring the legacy profile avatars on 01/20/2022. Click this link to read more.
01/05/2022: Welcome to CES 2022!
12/7/2021: New firmware version 1.3.0 is available for Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x