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Grainy photos - Rebel T7

wildreinphoto
Apprentice

I recently got a canon rebel t7 for Christmas 

I mainly shoot with horses and people . 

I am shooting in manual and feel like my subjects faces are not sharp enough and/ or pretty grainy . Even if they are standing still and there is no movement . 

Basically the persons face is very grainy  and sometimes even the whole picture 

Here is a photo for reference . Can anyone help and tell me what I’m doing wrong ? 

 

4 REPLIES 4

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

Hi and welcome to the forum:
Unfortunately there is no sign of a photo. 
However, my first question would be why you are shooting in M mode rather than Av.  If you do shoot in AV mode how does the noise work out?


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

rs-eos
Elite
Elite

Unless you are very familiar with all aspects of the exposure triangle and need complete control over all variables, then agree that Manual mode should be avoided for now.

While Aperture priority mode (Av) is definitely a far easier mode to use, also look at Shutter priority (Tv) since I imagine your subjects move quite a bit. Tv lets you control how you want to either show motion or freeze motion. Av is great when you want to control the depth of field. i.e. how much of the image will be in focus or not.

Grainy images are a result of ISO values being high. Do note though that depending upon what lens you are using and what the current lighting conditions are, it could be that you are at the limits of your equipment.

For example, if you are in an indoor area with a kit lens of EF-S 18-135mm such that it’s zoomed at or near 135mm, the aperture will be f/5.6. That won’t let in much light when the overall lighting in the area isn’t really bright. So one option becomes to slow the shutter (but if subjects are moving, that will lead to blur). And so the final option is to raise ISO which increases noise.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

Another common cause for noise is under-exposure. Without clear, unprocesses images with the shooting data, it is very hard for us to assess the sitaution. Are you shooting in RAW or JPG format?

If you can put an unprocessed image on a sharing site and send a link, that would help.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

stevet1
Whiz
Whiz

wildreinphoto,

In addition to the suggestion for using Av mode, (which Is a good suggestion for subjects that are standing still), try this:

For a little while, put your camera in P (or Program) mode. Get yourself a little notebook and take a handful of pictures.

For each picture you take, jot down what the conditions were like. Was it indoor and dark? Or was it outside and sunny. Write down the settings that your camera selected for the exposure it chose - the shutter speed, the aperture, and the ISO.

This might help you in deciding for yourself what settings to use in the future when using Manual Mode under varying conditions.

Steve Thomas

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