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New boy in town

cliveanne
Contributor

I have recently purchased a new camera, Good Friday 18th April, EOS600D. I am confused by the term "Rebel T3i",The box my camera came in has no mention of the  "Rebel T3i" neither does the handbook. The camera was brought as a 'bundle' EOS600D body, Canon zoom lens EF-S 18-55 1:3.5-5.6 III  58mm and  Canon zoom lens EF 75-300mm 1:4-5.6 III 58mm.

I see there is an update for the firmware, how do I go about doing this please, or will it not be needed?

 

I have used a bridge over the past years, and I felt it was time to expand my interest in photgraphy. I have recently brought two UV filters as protection for the lenses and will be collecting my lens hoods on Tuesday. So far, I have found the camera faily easy to get on with, I am still climbing the learning curve, and have quite a long way to go. Once I am feeling compitent with the camera, I shall be looking into taking RAW and editing the same. My editing skills are what could be considered as quite basic. I use two programs, Photoshop Elements 10, and Serif  PhotoPlus X6. I sometimes use a specific program to perform a task, then switch to the second progrm to finish the job. I find that one program can make certain tasks easier than the other. RAW on the other had is a diferent kettle of fish

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

If you intend on shooting RAW, which is a good idea, if you are after the best results the camera can produce.

 

I recommend you use Photoshop Elements exclusively at least until you unterstand exactly what is involved in the editing process.  Don't complicate it by using three different programs.

 

However, you need to understand your end goal.  What are you planning to do with your photos.  Some uses, RAW will not be better or even help.

 

For instance snap shots for grandma or posts on Facebook.  In these examples nix the RAW.  You want nice prints, maybe 8x10's or larger from a custom printer, by all means shoot RAW.

 

 

Knowing what you are doing is great as well as knowing how you are going to use is great, also.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

View solution in original post

You'll be fine working with RAW files in the software you have.

 

Elements is sort of a "light" version combining some features from both Photoshop and Lightroom. To work with RAW files, all Adobe software has a RAW converter "engine" embedded. It's called Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) and is at the core of Elements, Lightroom and Photoshop.

 

To use Elements 10 with RAW files from your new camera, you will need to have at least ACR version 6.4.1 installed. Note: currently I think ACR 6.7 is what's available for Elements 10 running on WIndows, or version 6.5 on Mac platforms. (ACR Versions 7.x and 8.x are for later versions of Element and are not compatible with Elements 10).

 

You can check which version of ACR you have installed by opening Elements, then go to the Help tab and click on it, then go to Plug-Ins, then Camera Raw. Or just click "Updates", then download and install the latest that's available for your version of Elements 10.

 

With 6.4.1 or later installed, your camera is supported. (Note: if you got a later camera model, such as 70D or 700D/T5i, I think you'd have to get a later version of Elements itself... 11 or 12. But with a 600D/T3i Elements 10 should be fine.)

 

Eventually you may want to update to a later version of Elements for capabilities that have been added. Or you might want to add Lightroom (which is designed to be an intensive, high volume cataloging tool with light  mostly global editing capabilities) and/or Photoshop (which is a very complete and very powerful image editing tool, able to work on images right down to the pixel level, with a little bit of cataloging and RAW conversion capabilities that are probably best suited for low volume and individual image work). Or you might be happy continuing to use Elements. Some people combine Lightroom with Elements. Some people only use Photoshop. It's up to you and depends upon what you shoot, how much you shoot, and what you do with your images, which is best for you.

 

If you have enough memory cards and hard drive storage space, you might set your camera to shoot RAW + JPEG. That way if in the future you want to go back and do some editing on images you take now, you'll have the RAW files to work with. This is also a great learning tool... when, with practice, you can coinsistently and reliably make a RAW conversion that's better than the JPEGs coming from you camera, you might want to go to RAW-only most of the time. May even wish to go back and delete the old JPEGs you stored (since you can always make a new, identical or better JPEG from the archived RAW file... you just can never make a RAW from a JPEG).  

 

The only down side to RAW + JPEG is more files to store, more storage space needed both in your camera and in your computer. Memory cards and hard disks are pretty cheap these days, but still there's some cost.

 

***********
Alan Myers

San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7D(x2), 50D(x3), some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & PRINTROOM 

 





View solution in original post

15 REPLIES 15


@cliveanne wrote:

I have recently purchased a new camera, Good Friday 18th April, EOS600D. I am confused by the term "Rebel T3i",The box my camera came in has no mention of the  "Rebel T3i" neither does the handbook. The camera was brought as a 'bundle' EOS600D body, Canon zoom lens EF-S 18-55 1:3.5-5.6 III  58mm and  Canon zoom lens EF 75-300mm 1:4-5.6 III 58mm.

 

For reasons known only to Canon's marketing department, Rebels are called by different names in different parts of the world. If you lived in the U.S., your camera would be called a T3i, and you'd see little or no mention of the "600D".

 

I see there is an update for the firmware, how do I go about doing this please, or will it not be needed?

 

You do it by copying the update file to a memory card and following the directions from there. Installing the update directly from a computer is (or was the last time I tried it) a confusing and error-prone process. I once had to send a Rebel to the Canon shop because I inadvertently failed to do the steps in exactly the right order. They fixed it under warranty and didn't charge me, but I may have just been lucky. Updating from a card is much more straightforward.

 

Whether the update will be needed or I not, I can't say. But it's usually a good idea to try to stay up to date.

 

I have used a bridge over the past years, and I felt it was time to expand my interest in photgraphy. I have recently brought two UV filters as protection for the lenses and will be collecting my lens hoods on Tuesday. So far, I have found the camera faily easy to get on with, I am still climbing the learning curve, and have quite a long way to go. Once I am feeling compitent with the camera, I shall be looking into taking RAW and editing the same. My editing skills are what could be considered as quite basic. I use two programs, Photoshop Elements 10, and Serif  PhotoPlus X6. I sometimes use a specific program to perform a task, then switch to the second progrm to finish the job. I find that one program can make certain tasks easier than the other. RAW on the other had is a diferent kettle of fish

 

Editing RAW is a different kettle of fish, but it isn't necessarily harder. At least with the editor I use (Digital Photo Pro), most edits are simpler and more effective when made on a RAW file. As long as you're willing to do the conversion to JPEG at the end, I suggest you start shooting RAW sooner rather than later.

 

Bob


 

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Thanks for the reply, useful reading.

 

Regarding the update I tried one many years ago on my Kodak 3600 (that's going back some) the update totally failed.

 

I think I would be using the program that came with the camera I will start using RAW as per your suggestion, I have to take the plunge sometime.

 

Once again thank you.

 

C.

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

If you intend on shooting RAW, which is a good idea, if you are after the best results the camera can produce.

 

I recommend you use Photoshop Elements exclusively at least until you unterstand exactly what is involved in the editing process.  Don't complicate it by using three different programs.

 

However, you need to understand your end goal.  What are you planning to do with your photos.  Some uses, RAW will not be better or even help.

 

For instance snap shots for grandma or posts on Facebook.  In these examples nix the RAW.  You want nice prints, maybe 8x10's or larger from a custom printer, by all means shoot RAW.

 

 

Knowing what you are doing is great as well as knowing how you are going to use is great, also.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

I was not aware that Elements did RAW, certainly worth a look, I have a CD that came with the camera, I think I will be giving the provided program a go. I will also take both RAW & JPEG as a single shot to compare. Later, Elemnts will come into it. It is a program I use most. I will not be mixing progams whilst in the RAW mode.

 

I seldom print my work these days, unless I get something that looks to be worth it. I used to print, but the photo group I was with folded, so I saw no need. I keep my images to look back on to see if I have made any improvements over time.

 

Thank you for your advice which I have taken on board.

 

C.

I would recommend just spending the money and getting Lightroom.  The price is so low now that every digital photographer should use it (or equivilent).  Photoshop is a great program, but it's simply not designed to manage photos coming out of your camera.  It's used to selectively edit specific photos.  Even with ACR and Bridge, it's just not anywhere near as efficient asan organization tool like Lightroom.  There's a small learning curve, but LR is very intuitive, and it really simplifies using RAW.  Once you get the hang of it you won't even notice your files are in RAW.  Just edit away.

 

Thanks for the suggestion. I will look into Lightroom, but my income is a fixed pension, so every penny has to work twice as hard.

Cheers 

 

C.

You get a free RAW editing program with your camera called Canon Digital Photo Professional. It's on the CD and you can download updates from the Canon support site.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

Thank you. I missed your input somehow


@cliveanne wrote:

Thanks for the suggestion. I will look into Lightroom, but my income is a fixed pension, so every penny has to work twice as hard.

Cheers 

 

C.


I understand that. I'm usually the last person on this site pushing people to upgrade, but I only bring it up because the price is rather afffordable now and is a very valuable program.  There's no rush, Photoshop elements and ACR can do everything you need it to do, it's just not as efficient at it.  Just something to keep in mind for down the road.  I know when I finally moved from Photoshop/Bridge to LR I wondered why I waited so long.

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