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Is a used Canon 60D with 20K shutter count and 18-135 lens worth buying for USD 290?

CairoKolton
New Contributor

Hello. Im a beginner photographer and don't really have a specific style of photography, hence the 18-135mm, which I think will be a good choice to explore a wide style of photography.

But is the the 60D is a good choice for 2021? I would ideally like to keep this long term, and so want something with decent quality that I can grow into. I was looking at the 700D before this, but cannot find a good listing for my tight student budget.

Thanks guys

4 REPLIES 4

Keh Camera is listinga 60D in Excellent condition at $350 w/o lens, so $290 w/lens seems like a good price if the camera is in quality condition.

 

They list the T5i (US version of 700D) for similar price.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

shadowsports
Esteemed Contributor

This is a hard question to answer.  I'll also start by saying I am not a fan of old/used gear.  

 

Do I think buying an 11yr old camera in 2021 is a good investment, no.

 

Shutter count is less important if the camera was properly cared for.  How does the seller know the count?  Is this a geusstimate, or did they install something to the camera's firmware (example magic latern) to read it?

 

Conversely, any camera is better than no camera at all.

 

You haven't provided an actual budget or your location.  If you are in Egypt I'm sure pickings are slim.  You'll have to decide if aspiring to buy and keep something over a decade old for the long term is a good investment.  

 

Keep one last thing in mind.  If anything goes wrong with it, you won't be able to get it serviced.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA
~6D2(v1.1.0) ~Many Lenses ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~Windows10 Pro ~EVGA RTX 2080 FTW3 Ultra ~ImageClass MF644Cdw ~Pixel6

wq9nsc
Respected Contributor

Are you confident of the shutter count?  I shoot mostly Canon 1 series gear which does provide a shutter count through the menu system but I recall there have been discrepancies between shutter count reported by third party software and that pulled by Canon at a service center so use caution.

 

The 60D was a solid camera when it was new and it will work as well now as it did back then.  Technology has made great leaps forward since then but that doesn't make a 60D obsolete IF it will still do what you need.  And I salute your personal responsibility in making sure that you stay within your student budget.

 

If you stay with photography, you will upgrade in the future so if the 60D is right for your budget and needs buy it.  I have upgraded a lot since I bought my first serious digital (Canon 1D Mark II) back in 2005 but if I put my EF 400 f2.8 on that over 15 year old body and took it to the soccer match this afternoon it would still produce incredible photos.  If the 60D is still in good shape, then it is still capable of producing some incredible captures and it is up to the photographer to make the most of the gear and the situation.

 

Rodger

EOS 1DX M3, 1DX M2, 1DX, 5DS R, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video

Tronhard
Respected Contributor

@CairoKolton wrote:

Hello. Im a beginner photographer and don't really have a specific style of photography, hence the 18-135mm, which I think will be a good choice to explore a wide style of photography.

But is the the 60D is a good choice for 2021? I would ideally like to keep this long term, and so want something with decent quality that I can grow into. I was looking at the 700D before this, but cannot find a good listing for my tight student budget.

Thanks guys


As has been mentioned, not knowing your budget is a bit of a challenge, so it's not easy to say anything constructive about that.

 

As to the camera...   As you say you are not yet into a specific style of photography yet, so that is actually quite helpful, and an 18-135 lens is a good kit lens (even better if it is the STM version).

 

It is important to make sure that any second-hand equipment is a wise purchase.  Is it from a reputable dealer, or are you getting it via a selling website or social media - the risk goes up there. Does it come with any kind of warranty or return if there is an issue within a given period?  Can you check if the seller is reputable?

 

Ideally, you want to be able to physically handle the camera, test that all the controls work and that there is no damage.  Shutter count, if accurate, is a good indicator of use, but other tell-tale signs are wear around the shutter button area and where your thumb would sit when holding the camera. Really shiny body areas suggest lots of use. 

 

Take your own card with  you to record the images and I suggest ideally having an experienced photographer do the testing for you, or at least read up on the camera manual a bit.   Test that the sensor works, the battery holds a charge, test different shutter speeds and aperture openings via the controls for Av Tv and M modes in particular.  Test the flash works.

 

If the price is right and the camera is working, I can assure you that this camera model is still capable of taking great images, especially if you are just starting out. I have three EOS 60D's and after 9 years or so I still enjoy using them.  A lot depends on what you intend to produce.  I would guess that it will be a while before you get into large, detailed prints, but I have created 30"x42" prints with the 60D - although a lot depends on the lenses you are using.

 

Here are some images taken with one of my own 60D's to show you what it is capable of: All images hand-held in available light.

This one was taken recently with the 55-250 STM kit lens

IMG_0191 CM LR.jpg

 

60D with the Canon EF 70-300 IS USM MkII lens

_MG_3989 crop.jpg

 

with the Canon EF-S 15-85mm IS USM lens

Muriwai-Gannet colony A.jpg

 

With the Canon EF-S 18-135 IS STM lens:

Veysie's Dragon Fly.jpg

 

What is important if the camera works is to go and learn about the camera - so check out manual - you can download a PDF HERE   If you have a subscription to the local library, do an on-line catalogue search for LinkedIn Learning.  If there is an item for it,  you can gain access to an amazing library of Video tutorials free, via your library.  There is a full series of tutorials on the EOS 60D.

 

Consider joining a local camera club or photographic society, you can learn a lot from those.

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me