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As I waited for the 5DIV

Edward
Enthusiast

I was considering the 1Dx MKII.  Hoping for Canon to make these cameras more in similarities as to the lay out of the button functions and improvements. Examples:

 

5D MK IV: 

 

1. Why not the ISO selection button and the top illuminatio button in the LCD panel moved to the same location the 1DX II?

2  Why was the ON/OFF not moved from the left top of the camera to the rear right in a similar locations as the 1Dx II?  At one time it was located with the multi function lock switch in the back of the camera where it was easier to operate particularly when using long lenses.  Also the groove where the switch of the camera is now, allows for water to acummulate probably able to cause a water leak into the camera.

3.  The Rating Button may be good for photo newbies but any serious photographer would not use that button since the JPEG image in the back LCD is not good enough to rate images.  And to add injury, this button cannont be programmed for something more useful.

4. The exposure level indicator in the 5DIV is at the bottom of the viewfinder while in the 1DX MKII is vertically in the right side of the viewfinder.  It's location will b

22 REPLIES 22

The problem is how much gear can one carry.  Already carrying 40 pounds and walking in the cold between 10-12,000 feet is not fun.  


@TTMartin wrote:

@Edward wrote:

Because the automatic sleep setting uses power and in cold conditions the battery efficiency decreases.  I carry extra bateries inside my cold gear close to the body to keep them warm.   When you are waiting for the action, it takes hour before something comes along. Also, at times there is no place to charge batteries.  For example, last March I was in the Himalayas searching for Panda bears (never saw one) and the area is not electrified, so I had to rely in the 8 batteries that I carried. Could not recharge until I got back to the lowlands.


You might want to consider a Goal Zero Guide 10 Solar Kit to recharge your batteries. ...


If you find yourself in Iceland in the winter, good luck finding sunlight strong enough to power a solar charger!

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@TTMartin wrote:

@Edward wrote:

Because the automatic sleep setting uses power and in cold conditions the battery efficiency decreases.  I carry extra bateries inside my cold gear close to the body to keep them warm.   When you are waiting for the action, it takes hour before something comes along. Also, at times there is no place to charge batteries.  For example, last March I was in the Himalayas searching for Panda bears (never saw one) and the area is not electrified, so I had to rely in the 8 batteries that I carried. Could not recharge until I got back to the lowlands.


You might want to consider a Goal Zero Guide 10 Solar Kit to recharge your batteries. ...


If you find yourself in Iceland in the winter, good luck finding sunlight strong enough to power a solar charger!


The example he gave was at 10,000 feet in the Himalayas. At 10,000 feet you have half as much atmosphere filtering the sun so solar panels are more efficient there than at sea level. 

 

As far as weight goes, I was researching them for an AT Thru-Hike. It weighs 1.5 lbs (solar panel, 4 AA batteries, and AA charger which doubles as a USB battery bank), and can strap to the top of your backpack so they work even as you are hiking. 

"The example he gave was at 10,000 feet in the Himalayas. At 10,000 feet you have half as much atmosphere filtering the sun so solar panels are more efficient there than at sea level. "

 

I thought he made a different point.  How many hours of sunlight do you get each day in Iceland in the middle of the winter?

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

"The example he gave was at 10,000 feet in the Himalayas. At 10,000 feet you have half as much atmosphere filtering the sun so solar panels are more efficient there than at sea level. "

 

I thought he made a different point.  How many hours of sunlight do you get each day in Iceland in the middle of the winter?


I wasn't replying to Iceland in the middle of winter, I was replying to Himalayas at 10,000 feet in March.

 

 

The hours of sunlight in Iceland are controlled by the time of the year and the weather; in fact all year round the cloud cover is high.  As they say in Iceland:  Wait 15 minutes and the weather will change.  Solar power is not a good choice for Iceland for charging batteries or for home solar panels.  They have plenty of hydrothermal energy.


@Edward wrote:

Look again!!! The exposure level indicator in the 7DII is in the same position as in the 5DIV and as in every previous 7D and 5D series. Only the IDx series currently and the previous Canon 1 DS MK 1to 4 (including the MK II N) cameras had the vertical exposure level indicators.

 

If you use long white lenses which normal people hold with the left hand, it is easier to have the on/off switch position in the rear right. Otherwise, one has to reach over to the camera left side with the right handto switch the camera on/off. It is not a question of happiness but of common sense and great design.


No need to look again (I know my 7D Mk II), the bottom scale is the exposure compensation and bracketing, in Manual mode the exposure scale is vertical is on the right side with dual indicators one for the cameras exposure and the other for flash exposure. 

7d viewfibder.JPG

Sorry, same name for similar indicators.  I was referring to the AEB one at the bottom with the -3 to +3 scale.


@Edward wrote:

Sorry, same name for similar indicators.  I was referring to the AEB one at the bottom with the -3 to +3 scale.


The 1DX Mk II has that in the same place as the 7D Mk II. The viewfinder screens of the 1DX Mk II and the 7D Mk II have very similar layouts.

 

1dxmkii 2.jpg

7Dmkii 2.jpg

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