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EF-S 10-22mm Canon not working in AF correct

AlanRhodes
Contributor
My EF-S 10-22mm Canon lens in AF mode is mostly taking out of focus pictures. I tried the basic clean the post but still keeps center of image out of focus. All my other AF lens work fine. Base is a Canon 60D. I have had lens new for about 5 years with no issues until now.

Any suggestions?
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION


@AlanRhodes wrote:

Thank you all. I am going to send in the EF-S 10-22 to Canon and hope the cost is not too high to repair an already costly lens. I am buying a Tamron AF 17-50 mm F/2.8 SP XR Di II VC to have for this weekend sons grad party since my go to  Canon lens for this type of family shots is out of serveice. 

 

Feeling a little burned on the Canon lens, I paided the higher lens cost for the Canon expecting longer service and quality then I received. But since I am a novice I am going to give Tamron a try for my future business this go around.


Regarding the Tamron lens, the non-VC version is thought by most users to give better image quality than the more expensive VC version. And both versions do not have a USD focus system, which Tamron is starting to put on their more premium models and is similar to Canon's USM. So do not expect the same level of focus performance as you would typically see with a 10-22mm or the Canon EF-S 17-55mm, which costs more but also gives top quality IS and a slightly longer telephoto.

 

Frankly, the problem you have with the 10-22mm seems quite unusual. Not to defend Canon (they can do that themselves), but I rarely see any complaints about that particular lens. Most users are very happy with the 10-22mm, many consider it one of the best ultrawides made by anyone, and decentered lens elements are usually the result of a hard bump to the lens or heavy wear and tear on moving parts, or occasionally a manufacturing flaw. I would encourage you to not judge Canon lenses on the whole, or even this ultrawide model, based upon your bad experiences with this one particular copy of the lens.

 

For your purposes - family shots - an ultrawide lens wouldn't be my first choice anyway. I think most photogs would call a 17-50 or 17-55/2.8 a better choice. Taking photos of people with an ultrawide, they often end up too small in the image, or heavily distorted if the lens is used close enough to fill the frame. This isn't any fault with the ultrawide lens, it's just the nature of wide angle optics. There are reasons that portrait lenses tend to be short to moderate telephoto focal lengths. A standard zoom (covering slightly wide to normal to short telephoto range of focal lengths), such as 18-55, 17-50, 17-55 would be a better choice in most cases.  

 

I'm sure ebiggs assertions about EF-S lenses have a lot to do with his use of several cameras that cannot be fitted with EF-S lenses. I do too... so I minimize the number of "crop only" lenses in my kit (but the EF-S 10-22mm is one of several exceptons). You don't have this limitation with a 60D, which can use both EF and EF-S mount lenses without any problem. That being the case, the EF-S 17-55/2.8 IS USM is likely a better choice for you. For close to the same money, it has better image quality than the 17-40L, as well as f2.8 aperture and a wider range of focal lengths. The only place the L lens excels over the 17-55mm is probably build quality... The 17-40L is likely a bit better built and sealed to resist dust and moisture.  

 

There are not and never will be an EF-S L-series lens. This isn't in any way due to the quality of EF-S lenses. It is only because Canon's own definition of what constitutes and L-series includes a stipulation that they must be compatible with all EOS cameras past, present and future. By design, EF-S lenses are not usable on film, digital full frame, or digital APS-H crop sensor camera models. They are compatible with APS-C crop sensor models, which are the vast majority of DSLRs that Canon sells, beginning with the original digital Rebel and 20D models of 2004/2005.

 

Several EF-S lenses are top quality and offer performance that rivals or even sets the standard among all manufacturers. The 10-22mm is one of those (usually... a faulty copy such as yours is very rare). I'd also count the EF-S 17-55mm, EF-S 15-85mm and EF-S 60/2.8 Macro lenses among the very best in their respective categories.

 

***********
Alan Myers

San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7D(x2), 50D(x3), some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & PRINTROOM  

View solution in original post

21 REPLIES 21

And the lens does this on both camera bodies?  Yes?  The lens is bad.  It needs to be evaluated by Canon service to see if repair is feasible.  Cost may be prohibitive.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Yes does same but not always same part of image is blurred but 90% shots are bad. Rather disappointed if this ~$600 lens is bad and not sure I want to rebuy same lens if this is the quality I get. Any recommendation on a good all around portrait and landscape lens as this was my go to lens for family shots, car shows and landscape shots. I had alway bought Canon bodies for the lens but starting to rethink this now.

Thank you

Well all is not lost yet.  Have it evaluated.

But remember anything made by the hand of Man can and will eventualy fail.  Smiley Frustrated

 

This is a good lens and is probably better than anything else in it's focal length.  There are offerings from the 3rd party world but they will be no better QA wise or construction wise.  I have the very same lens and I also like it very much.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Your lens needs to go in for evaluation and repair. It looks like a badly decentered lens element to me. That requires disassembly and repair. No amount of fooling around with it or cleaning the contacts will make it work right.

 

It appears not to be a fault of the camera itself, especially if your other lenses focus correctly. In fact it's not really the auto focus system at fault, when part of an image is out of focus like that, while the other part (in the same plane of focus) is sharp. It's gotta be an optical fault within the lens.

 

Probably the reason it appeared to work differently ("better", but still not right) on another camera is because it was set up to use a smaller aperture, giving more depth of field that covered up some of the fault of the lens.

 

If, as you say, 90% of the images are bad... that implies the other 10% are okay. Check those and see if a smaller (higher f-number like 11, 16 or 22) is being used, rendering more depth of field. Otherwise, it might be a loose element or focusing group, that's finding focus one out of ten times, but failing the rest.

 

No matter, really. The lens needs to go in for evaluation and, if economically sensible, repair.

 

***********
Alan Myers

San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7D(x2), 50D(x3), some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & PRINTROOM 

 






OK thank you. Looks like I need to send lens in. Problem in I have my sons graduation party this Saturday. Is cost to repair close to if I go get the same lens new? Or any recommendation on a different lens to go buy for un posed family party shots?

Although the 10-22mm is a good lens I would prefer the EF 17-40mm f4 L.  This is just my personal prefference but I no longer buy any EF-S glass.  There has to be a very goood reason to break that rule for me.  There is no "L" made in EF-S for instance.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Any thoughts on the EF-S 17-55 f2.8 IS has a all around replacement for my 10-22mm?

You already know my answer.

 

"... I no longer buy any EF-S glass."

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

The image certainly looks like one of the lens elements is out of collimation -- possibly not perpendicular to the lens axis (as if it's come loose). This can also be caused by a sensor which isn't shimmed (there are adjustment screws inside the camera so that service can shim the sensor plane) except that since the problem follows the lens, your issue is certainly with the lens.

The EF-S 10-22 has a good reputation so I doubt you run into this with a different copy of the same lens.

As for the 17-55... that's a completely different lens. The 10-22 is an ultra-wide. The 17-55 is a standard zoom (ranging from slight wide angle through normal and into a slight telephoto). The main advantage of the 17-55 is that it can provide f/2.8 focal ratio at any focal length in it's range (the kit lens, for example, can only offer f/3.5 at it's widest angle, and reduces aperture to f/5.6 as you zoom in.) These two lenses have very little over-lap so you can't really call one a substitute for the other... but the 17-55 is a better general use lens.
Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

Thank you all. I am going to send in the EF-S 10-22 to Canon and hope the cost is not too high to repair an already costly lens. I am buying a Tamron AF 17-50 mm F/2.8 SP XR Di II VC to have for this weekend sons grad party since my go to  Canon lens for this type of family shots is out of serveice. 

 

Feeling a little burned on the Canon lens, I paided the higher lens cost for the Canon expecting longer service and quality then I received. But since I am a novice I am going to give Tamron a try for my future business this go around.

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