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aperture question apc to full frame

Sig226
New Contributor

Hello, 

 

I had just switched to full frame from a APC camera and I have an aperture question. I’m going to use landscape photography as an example. 

 

Let’s say I wanted to shoot a landscape picture on a APC camera with f16. Would it be the same on a full frame or would it be f25 (1.6x)? Of course the lens I’m using only goes to f22 at the wide-angle.

 

In my head I have the apertures I would use for some things, and I’m trying to figure out if I need to 1.6x all of them for full frame. May seem like a silly question, but I’m just trying to make sure I understand. 

 

Thanks

5 REPLIES 5

shadowsports
Esteemed Contributor

Greetings,

There is nothing you need to calculate or adjust for.  Aperture remains the same.  f16 on APS-C is f16 on full frame.  Its the diameter of the "hole" or amount of light that the sensor "sees" when a picture is taken.

~Rick
Bay Area - CA
~6D2(v1.1.0) ~Many Lenses ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~Windows10 Pro ~EVGA RTX 2080 FTW3 Ultra ~ImageClass MF644Cdw ~Pixel6

I agree with Rick. Exposure does not have a crop factor.  Case in point, light meters do not have a crop factor.  

 

The biggest source of this misunderstanding is a YouTuber named Tony Northrup.  He's wrong on too many levels to iterate. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

"... YouTuber named Tony Northrup.  He's wrong on too many levels to iterate."

 

I could not have said that better.  He is a person to be avoided. As is a lot of what you read or see on the ole inner web.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

ebiggs1
Forum Elite

"In my head I have the apertures I would use for some things, and I’m trying to figure out if I need to 1.6x all of them for full frame. May seem like a silly question, but I’m just trying to make sure I understand."

 

You are not alone. Crop factor is one of the most misunderstood and totally useless things to ever hit the photography world.

One thing you must keep in mind is DOF but this comes with an understanding of how a given lens reacts on a given camera.  

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Here are the facts.  The picture with a cropper looks like it is magnified compared to a FF. Same lens on either. A 35mm lens on a cropper has the same focal length (FL) as a 35mm on a FF.  However, if we check DOF, we do see a difference. The photo from the cropper has a different DOF. The reason is due to the shorter appearent FL (56mm), which affects the DOF.

You are changing the FL distance to the subject, which is the reason the DOF is different.

 

A crop sensor camera does not crop anything. It takes the photo exactly as you see it in the view finder (VF). The image circle produced by the lens has a different ange the field (AOV). That is where it gets the misleading term "crop factor". All camera sensor sizes have crop factors, however, none seem to be used like the one for the 35mm FF vs Cropper.

 

It does not affect the aperture ratio.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!