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Face overexposed in concert photography

ilzho
Rising Star

Hello:

 

Quick question.

I'm looking for some suggestions on how to compensate for over exposed faces during concert photography.

 

I can adjust most of this in post processing, but it's better if I start with a not so over exposed face.

 

I was in manual mode, spot metering with a canon.

The spot is obviosuly in the middle of the frame and caught her black dress which over exposed the skin tones. I used BBF and the AF point was near the top of the frame.

 

Just looking for some suggestions.

This is a RAW file just to show what I'm talking about.

J.383A8762.jpg

20 REPLIES 20

TTMartin
Authority

@ilzho wrote:

Hello:

 

Quick question.

I'm looking for some suggestions on how to compensate for over exposed faces during concert photography.

 

I can adjust most of this in post processing, but it's better if I start with a not so over exposed face.

 

I was in manual mode, spot metering with a canon.

 


First do NOT use spot metering. Spot metering metered for the black dress at the center of the frame. Use evaluative metering, turn 'blinkies' on, and dial in negative exposure compensation to eliminate the 'blinkies' on all but specular highlights. This requires an automatic exposure mode, like Av/Tv/or M with Auto ISO. With the rapidly changing lighting of a concert it is next to impossible to use full Manual mode.


@TTMartin wrote:

First do NOT use spot metering. Spot metering metered for the black dress at the center of the frame. Use evaluative metering, turn 'blinkies' on, and dial in negative exposure compensation to eliminate the 'blinkies' on all but specular highlights. This requires an automatic exposure mode, like Av/Tv/or M with Auto ISO. With the rapidly changing lighting of a concert it is next to impossible to use full Manual mode.


Actually, I'd be inclined to use Center-Weighted Averaging. Evaluative might give too much weight to the very dark background. And you should be able to turn the highlights down in post, as long as you don't let them get fully blown.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Thanks guys.

Yes I can correct in post, but I only have lightroom, so I'm a little limited in that regard, but it still works.

 

Don't get me wrong, I have plenty of keepers, but just a little frustrating seeing this on the back of my camera and trying to fix.

I guess with experience, I will get more comfortable.


@ilzho wrote:

Thanks guys.

Yes I can correct in post, but I only have lightroom, so I'm a little limited in that regard, but it still works.

 

Don't get me wrong, I have plenty of keepers, but just a little frustrating seeing this on the back of my camera and trying to fix.

I guess with experience, I will get more comfortable.


You don't think LR is up to the job of toning down the highlights? Jeez, don't tell Ernie Biggs that; he'll have a fit!

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

No it can. I just know PS is more powerful.


@ilzho wrote:

No it can. I just know PS is more powerful.


Not for that really, LR is all you need.


@TTMartin wrote:

@ilzho wrote:

No it can. I just know PS is more powerful.


Not for that really, LR is all you need.


I agree.  I only use PS for some special effect, for manufacturing a photograph.  A radial filter can fix it up, or even the brush.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

Sanjaydesai
Enthusiast

If you are spotmetering the black dress the exposure reading shows for zone v to make black dress 18% gray. You need make two stop underexose in order to m ake black dress black and rest of all will follow.

ebiggs1
Legend

How you meter is not the problem.

However you meter, you always want to underexpose a shot like this.  Overexposed loses details while under can be retrieved, usually.

 

As to the use of LR vs PS, LR is the starer program. PS is the finisher.  If there is some detail left in the face, PS can easily recover it with a simple mask and layers.

 

In you sample shot even the dress looks overexposed to me.  If it is a black dress, that is.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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