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Which body?

inkjunkie
Enthusiast

I know this is a VERY loaded question. And has probably been asked hundreds of times. I take pictures at the local dragstrip. Some landscape pictures. And lots of pictures of our dogs. Do 0 printing, only share them to Facebook. Was using an EOS40D. Been wanting a new camera so I bought the EOS7Ti. Really like the camera. Started shooting video with it. 

But.....I want to get a full frame camera...any suggestions? Been looking at the refurbished Canon page...

26 REPLIES 26

Waddizzle
Legend

What is your budget?  There is the 6D, and the 5D3.  I would suggest the 6D, simply because of price.  It should easily handle landscape, dogs, and dragsters.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

The all important budiet. I am disabled. Still have a fairly decent income. While I could very easy it pull out a credit card and pay $4500 for a body I would prefer not to...especially if it something I will never be able to utilize all of its functions...a given what I recently read I have no real need for a 50 megapixel camera....assuming that the few different blogs I recently read were truthful about megapixel size for posting Social Media pictures. Would not have a problem spending $2500 on a body. 

 


@inkjunkie wrote:

I know this is a VERY loaded question. And has probably been asked hundreds of times. I take pictures at the local dragstrip. Some landscape pictures. And lots of pictures of our dogs. Do 0 printing, only share them to Facebook. Was using an EOS40D. Been wanting a new camera so I bought the EOS7Ti. Really like the camera. Started shooting video with it. 

But.....I want to get a full frame camera...any suggestions? Been looking at the refurbished Canon page...


You're proposing to do what many of us have done, so we're not likely to tell you it's a bad idea. But you should at least be able to articulate why you want to do it. For the type of photography you say you do, especially given the fact that large prints are not a requirement, it isn't obvious that the benefit is worth the cost. Could you open up a bit about your long- and short-term objectives?

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

This is a bit difficult for me to explain. I have seen photos from various different folks that were taken on full size cameras.  I realize that these photos were more than likely shot in raw and massaged some in an aftershocks program. But this pictures were very eye catching. The focused image was very sharp...with noticeably more detail than what I take. 

I realize that I need to learn how to take better photos before I can utilize a better body. 

 

After posting this last night I realized that I need tof not be so hooked on a full frame. That I need to get better lenses and learn how to use them..and the body correctly. But it doesn't change the fact I would like to get a full size body. 

 

Long and short term objectives...this sounds like a bit of a cop out but I just want to become a better photographer. The owner of the track has given me permission to be trackside next year. In exchange he is expecting me to provide him with some eye grabbing stills and video. 

 

I am one of those folks that sets his goals a bit higher than they should be. I have severe Cervical and Lumbar Spinal stenosis...so often times achieving my goals has become **bleep** near impossible...of late I have repeatedly let myself down...I don't want this to be another one of "those times". 

I hope this answered your question...if not please just say so...I will put some more thought into this...

If you aren't printing and only posting JPEGs to Facebook I don't think you will see any benefit to a full frame camera.

 

But, if you are like me, I know you want to prove this to yourself.

 

Consider renting a full frame camera and appropriate lens and use both at a typical venue where you shoot. Then you will know.

 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

I think that there is a significant difference between an APS-C sensor and full frame sensor at the higher ISO settings.  With that said, for most of the shooting scenarios that you have described a high ISO vale won’t come along too often, not unless you’re shooting outdoor action at night.

 

Your T7i is capable of producing nearly the same quality images as a full frame at the lower ISO settings.  It should be able to track subjects better than a 6D, too.  But, that doesn’t mean that a 6D cannot track subjects well, because it can.

If you have that sort of budget, then I would recommend investing in professional grade zoom lens.  Your photos will never be better than the quality of your lenses.  I would suggest either the EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS II USM, or the EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM.

 

Having a wide angle lens and fast prime in your bag doesn’t hurt, either.  Take a look at what Canon calls its “Portrait and Travel Kit”, or the “Advanced Lens Kit”.

 

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/portrait-and-travel-two-lens-kit

 

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/portrait-and-travel-two-lens-kit

 

 

Either one of those kits is a winner..  BTW, the EOS 6D Mark 2 is an excellent camera, too.  I think it might be what you are looking for in a camera body.  It has a full frame sensor, and the same AF system as the T7i.  Just remember, the glass is where the rubber hits the road.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

You can't get the full frame body without getting a couple of full frame compatible EF lenses. It is also true that upgrading your lenses will make an immediate noticeable improvement in image quality; much more so than adding a full frame body would.

Why not do this in logical stages then? Go buy a couple of great lenses and see how good a job your very capable T7i can do with them as you work on your photography. Then decide if you want to go full frame or not and if you do you will have the lenses too.

I would recommend the EF 70-200 f/2.8 IS II lens for sure. As a bonus the 200mm zoom gives you reach like a 320mm zoom when mounted on your crop sensor body.
Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?

https://petapixel.com/2017/10/03/full-frame-vs-crop-sensor-shootout-can-tell-difference/

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic


@jrhoffman75 wrote:

https://petapixel.com/2017/10/03/full-frame-vs-crop-sensor-shootout-can-tell-difference/


Meaningless, IMHO.  Without knowing the ISO exposure settings, the comparisons are meaningless.  I have already admitted that there is little difference at the lower ISO settings.  And, the article points out that they used wide aperture settings to keep ISO low.

My point has been, and still is that the differences show up the most at higher ISO settings, upwards of ISO 3200 and ISO 6400. Compare two photos taken at ISO 128000.  In most cases, it will be like night and day.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."
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