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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎02-28-2013

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?

There's more than just shallow DoF in Cindy's image, the thing is plain old OOF (not to mention underexposed and backlit).  I thought it was something dropped into a vessle of water at first, but now I'm starting to think it's a flower of some sort.  I think Cindy is a troll so I wasn't putting too much effort into it, but I thought that if we're going to put up an example of the sharpness of the 100mm macro it should at least be a representative image.

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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎04-14-2014

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?

It would have been a cool shot if it were in focus.  Beautiful pictures of flowers do not get noticed by contest judges, unless they stand out in some unique way.  The way to stay ahead of the pack is to always be thinking outside of the box.  

How exactly do you define troll?  What have I done to stir up trouble?  I am just trying to get this problem figured out so I can get back to shooting.  This situation has been a huge distraction for me lately.  It would be nice if we could get a chance to test drive a camera before we buy so we could make sure we have a better fit.  

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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎05-12-2014

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?

""What have I done to stir up trouble?  I am just trying to get this problem figured out so I can get back to shooting.  This situation has been a huge distraction for me lately""

 

Sorry cindy I'm gonna havta throw the bull**bleep** flag here.

 

It all started with this...".Does spending more mean getting less?"

 

These people have been sincere with their help and I just cant see where it was accepted by you, so really, whats your point?

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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎04-14-2014

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?

So simply posing a question labels you a troll?  Ok then.

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VIP
Posts: 13,159
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?

Bottom line is simply this, the EOS 6D combined with the EF 100mm f2.8L is a top level combo.  It can and will make prize winiing photographs that are as good as it gets in the photographic world.  Those are the facts.

Until you are ready to find out the capabilities of this equipment, I can be of little more help.

You have got to know where the problem is.  Is it you or is it the equipment?

 

Do the homework.  Do the tests.  Than post back here and you will get advice of what you should do. Smiley Frustrated

EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎04-14-2014

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?

Ok, so I guess there is not much I can do other that having to adjust my shooting style to accomodate this camera.  I have noticed that if I put it in any other program mode besides manual or apeture priority, it tends to always pick 2.8 for an apeture setting, which means a very narrow DoF.  Funny how that did not seem to happen when I used my other camera.  But I am just going to trust that this will be a good camera and lens for both macro and portrait.  I am always looking for the most bang for my buck and don't feel comfortable spending a lot of money on something that is so specialized in its use.  I guess that is why I liked my old setup.  I could take it and shoot almost any situation.  I like to shoot anything and everything.  I resist falling into a niche.  I suppose that is why the camera store people had trouble steering me toward any particular camera.  The 6D is a different animal and if I intend to keep it, I am going to have to get to know it a lot better than I do now.  I am just disappointed that I will not be able to use it in the same manner as I did my T3i, as in now I can only use manual or AV.  These cameras are expensive and have a lot of options.  I feel if I don't use them, it is kind of like buying a TV and only using one or two channels.  

I am not opposed to using a focul rail(or focus wheel) as LCambell suggested, but then again I fail to see why this lens has IS if you must use a tripod for macro.  And some places do not allow tripods.  Then what can you do?  I would also like a suggestion about manual focusing.  Back in the day when I had my OM-1 it was easy to do with the split line.  It is much harder now to tell if it is in focus without a built-in gauge.  Any other tips you might have that could help, would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,849
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?


@Cindy-Clicks wrote:

Ok, so I guess there is not much I can do other that having to adjust my shooting style to accomodate this camera.  I have noticed that if I put it in any other program mode besides manual or apeture priority, it tends to always pick 2.8 for an apeture setting, which means a very narrow DoF.  Funny how that did not seem to happen when I used my other camera.  


If it did not happen with the other camera then you had more light. The camera meters the available light and works within the constraints you set when you use a semi-automatic mode such as Tv or Av mode. If you use Av mode then the camera will determine the shutter speed based on the meter reading. If you use Tv mode then the camera picks the aperture for you -- again based on metering. It can also boost ISO to compensate if you selected auto ISO (you can set a max ISO that it is not permitted to exceed) but if you pick a specific ISO then the only thing it can change is the aperture. The cameras likely meter the same given the same metering mode but you can choose evaluative, center-weighted, or spot metering.


But I am just going to trust that this will be a good camera and lens for both macro and portrait.  I am always looking for the most bang for my buck and don't feel comfortable spending a lot of money on something that is so specialized in its use.  I guess that is why I liked my old setup.  I could take it and shoot almost any situation.  I like to shoot anything and everything.  I resist falling into a niche.  I suppose that is why the camera store people had trouble steering me toward any particular camera.


The T3i is a generic camera in that it doesn't have optimizations for low light or action, etc. The 6D has a slightly better focusing system but is MUCH better in low light. It also is not optimized for action. In that respect it is a bit of a general purpose camera. What sets it apart is that it is a full-frame camera with excellent low-light performance (it can focus in significantly less light than your T3i and it can also shoot at significantly higher ISO speeds and still keep noise under control (much more than your T3i could handle.)


 The 6D is a different animal and if I intend to keep it, I am going to have to get to know it a lot better than I do now.  I am just disappointed that I will not be able to use it in the same manner as I did my T3i, as in now I can only use manual or AV.  These cameras are expensive and have a lot of options.  I feel if I don't use them, it is kind of like buying a TV and only using one or two channels.  

You are struggling with basic exposure issues. I realize you say you've had a T3i and have been shooting for a while, but I don't think you actually understand how some fundamentals of photography work... e.g. exposure values and the exposure triangle, depth of field concepts, etc. When you take a shot, the amount of available light is whatever it is... which camera you are using doesn't do much to alter the exposure choices... sure one lens might have a lower possible f-stop value, etc. but I can use a hand-held light meter not made by Canon or Nikon or Olympus or anyone else and it can give me an exposure reading. I can then use that exposure in any camera I want. If the meter says I can shoot at ISO 200, f/8, and 1/800th then I can use those exposure settings (or equivalent exposures) in ANY camera brand or model. I really suggest you pick up some reading on those subjects. The Bryan Peterson "Understanding Exposure" book is highly recommended -- as is the Scott Kelby "Digital Photography" series of books.


I am not opposed to using a focul rail(or focus wheel) as LCambell suggested, but then again I fail to see why this lens has IS if you must use a tripod for macro.  And some places do not allow tripods.  Then what can you do?  I would also like a suggestion about manual focusing.  Back in the day when I had my OM-1 it was easy to do with the split line.  It is much harder now to tell if it is in focus without a built-in gauge.  Any other tips you might have that could help, would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!


 

Film cameras with manual focus lenses tended to have the split-prism focus aid. Auto-focus cameras tend to not have them anymore (there are some companies that make focus screens that have them) I believe the Canon Eg-S super-precision focusing screen is compatible with your 6D. The focus screen has a matte texture which exaggerates the blur in out of focus areas making it easier to tell when the lens is focused (when focusing manually) -- however that particular focus screen needs more light and is designed for use with f/2.8 and lower focal ratio lenses.

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎04-14-2014

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?

The camera store guy told me that these cameras prioritize the shutter before the aperture.  He said if I expect the camera to back down from that 2.8, I am going to have to raise the ISO.  But I generally shot my T3i in 100-400, sometimes higher, but it definitely got noisier.  Granted, I was usually not focusing in the one foot range.  And I haven't thus far with this camera, but  I want to be able to get that close sometimes.  That is why the focus ring might be helpful.  But the fact of the matter is I won two international awards with that camera so I must have been doing something right.  But I admit that when I first got my Rebel XT back in 2006, switching to digital was a little overwhelming and I never really took it out of auto.  I suppose it made me lazy because I let the camera make all the decisions for me.  Now I mainly switch between 3 or 4 program modes  because I don't want to take the time to make adjustments and fiddle with knobs once the veiwfinder is on my eye.  Then all I want to do is concentrate on getting a good composition.  

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Valued Contributor
Posts: 425
Registered: ‎01-19-2014

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?


@TCampbell wrote:

@Cindy-Clicks wrote:

Ok, so I guess there is not much I can do other that having to adjust my shooting style to accomodate this camera.  I have noticed that if I put it in any other program mode besides manual or apeture priority, it tends to always pick 2.8 for an apeture setting, which means a very narrow DoF.  Funny how that did not seem to happen when I used my other camera.  


If it did not happen with the other camera then you had more light. The camera meters the available light and works within the constraints you set when you use a semi-automatic mode such as Tv or Av mode. If you use Av mode then the camera will determine the shutter speed based on the meter reading. If you use Tv mode then the camera picks the aperture for you -- again based on metering. It can also boost ISO to compensate if you selected auto ISO (you can set a max ISO that it is not permitted to exceed) but if you pick a specific ISO then the only thing it can change is the aperture. The cameras likely meter the same given the same metering mode but you can choose evaluative, center-weighted, or spot metering.


But I am just going to trust that this will be a good camera and lens for both macro and portrait.  I am always looking for the most bang for my buck and don't feel comfortable spending a lot of money on something that is so specialized in its use.  I guess that is why I liked my old setup.  I could take it and shoot almost any situation.  I like to shoot anything and everything.  I resist falling into a niche.  I suppose that is why the camera store people had trouble steering me toward any particular camera.


The T3i is a generic camera in that it doesn't have optimizations for low light or action, etc. The 6D has a slightly better focusing system but is MUCH better in low light. It also is not optimized for action. In that respect it is a bit of a general purpose camera. What sets it apart is that it is a full-frame camera with excellent low-light performance (it can focus in significantly less light than your T3i and it can also shoot at significantly higher ISO speeds and still keep noise under control (much more than your T3i could handle.)


 The 6D is a different animal and if I intend to keep it, I am going to have to get to know it a lot better than I do now.  I am just disappointed that I will not be able to use it in the same manner as I did my T3i, as in now I can only use manual or AV.  These cameras are expensive and have a lot of options.  I feel if I don't use them, it is kind of like buying a TV and only using one or two channels.  

You are struggling with basic exposure issues. I realize you say you've had a T3i and have been shooting for a while, but I don't think you actually understand how some fundamentals of photography work... e.g. exposure values and the exposure triangle, depth of field concepts, etc. When you take a shot, the amount of available light is whatever it is... which camera you are using doesn't do much to alter the exposure choices... sure one lens might have a lower possible f-stop value, etc. but I can use a hand-held light meter not made by Canon or Nikon or Olympus or anyone else and it can give me an exposure reading. I can then use that exposure in any camera I want. If the meter says I can shoot at ISO 200, f/8, and 1/800th then I can use those exposure settings (or equivalent exposures) in ANY camera brand or model. I really suggest you pick up some reading on those subjects. The Bryan Peterson "Understanding Exposure" book is highly recommended -- as is the Scott Kelby "Digital Photography" series of books.


I am not opposed to using a focul rail(or focus wheel) as LCambell suggested, but then again I fail to see why this lens has IS if you must use a tripod for macro.  And some places do not allow tripods.  Then what can you do?  I would also like a suggestion about manual focusing.  Back in the day when I had my OM-1 it was easy to do with the split line.  It is much harder now to tell if it is in focus without a built-in gauge.  Any other tips you might have that could help, would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!


 

Film cameras with manual focus lenses tended to have the split-prism focus aid. Auto-focus cameras tend to not have them anymore (there are some companies that make focus screens that have them) I believe the Canon Eg-S super-precision focusing screen is compatible with your 6D. The focus screen has a matte texture which exaggerates the blur in out of focus areas making it easier to tell when the lens is focused (when focusing manually) -- however that particular focus screen needs more light and is designed for use with f/2.8 and lower focal ratio lenses.


I feel like the left side of a brain met the right side for the first time and couldn't decide how to get along. Keep trying folks. :-)

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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎04-14-2014

Re: Does spending more mean getting less?

Absolutely!  It is no secret that men and women are wired differently.  What I cannot understand is why no woman (to my knowledge) has ever really made a name fer herself in the field of landscape, wildlife, or nature photography.  I would appreciate getting some valuable advice from females once in a while.  

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