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planning upgrading from t3i

iphonemaster93
Rising Star

Hey guys!

So I've had my t3i for a while and I think I'm hitting the limitations in the t3i in terms of what I'm doing now. I've had the camera for about 1-2 years (was given to me as a xmas gift) and up until now, I've done automotive photography, nature photography, as well as portrait photography. I thought that the T3i was already a good enough camera for me to suit my needs but I realized I might need more now but I'm not sure. One night, I was doing rolling shots with a few buddies of mine and noticed in post processing, that there was a ton of grain in most of the pictures if I turned up the shadows (was shooting in betwen 1/10-1/20th of a second at F8.0 at 3200ISO. What are the benefits of upgrading from a T3i or do I just need a better lens? I was thinking of going to either a T4i or a T5i but at the same time, I want to go for a full frame sensored camera but I don't know if the types of photography I'm doing right now require such an advanced camera such as the 5D MkII  or if the t4i/t5i will be good enough. Also, do the lenses for the T3i work for the 5D MKII or do I have to purchase new lenses for it? I'm guessing the lenses for the T3i are compatible with the T4i and the T5i. Thanks!  

76 REPLIES 76

I'm actually going to try shooting at 1/300 today, i'm going on another cruise and I'm going to try shooting in P mode by only adjusting the aperture for rolling shots. I'll see how I do.

You can do as you like but you aren't using good photographic skills.  Certain things like landscapes vs show cars demand different approches.  The goal is different.

You can't decide on your SS at home or anything else setting wise until you see what it is.  What does it present you with?  Who knows untill you see it?

 

You can rely on basic knowledge like a landscape wants a small aperture like f8, f11 and even f16.  SS doesn't need to be all that fast but fast enough.  Where are you going to place the focus point?  There might be something really important to make sure it is the main most thing.

 

A good start for a static landscape might be f16, 1/125, ISO 100 with a 24mm lens but I would do several "bracketed" shots to see what works best.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

I don't have a 24mm so I just used my 17-55mm for my landscape long exposure shot (which worked, as I just got a B+W MRC 10 stop ND filter) and it was ok. I just need a wired/wireless shutter remote now to get a longer exposure. We were also in a restricted area so I actually couldn't take the time to get the shots that I wanted, plus I was only limited to a 30 second exposure with foggy weather conditions.

 

I also shot a lot of rolling shots on the highway and actually kept the camera in shutter priority mode, kept it at around 1/125 shutter, around ISO 1000, annd case 2 with constant focusing on the object and avoiding possible obstacles, because there were both dimly and brightly lit areas and I'm surprised, some shots were amazing in comparison to when I had the camera manually set at 1/40 of a second, at F.11 at say, ISO 800 or something. 

"I don't have a 24mm so I just used my 17-55mm for my landscape ..."

 

If you have a 17-55mm, than you have a 24mm.  Right?  But that was just a thought, not a reccommendation.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"I don't have a 24mm so I just used my 17-55mm for my landscape ..."

 

If you have a 17-55mm, than you have a 24mm.  Right?  But that was just a thought, not a reccommendation.


Well, er, the reason he mentioned a "24mm" was that you did, in your previous post. And I, for one, can understand why he might have assumed you meant a 24mm prime. But of course that, too, is just a thought.  Smiley Frustrated

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Bob from Boston,

I know you have a point because I meet a lot of folks that seem to forget there are mm inside their zoom lenses.  Folks tend to be aware of just the ends of the zoom range.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

my bad haha but that's true XD Now that I think of it, I normally tend to shoot past the 20mm range, unless the subject is incredibly close to me or I'm standing at a corner of a beach.

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