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black line on my t3i

didakh
Apprentice

Hi, I am new here, I have a canon t3i and I start getting a black line on top of the pictures.

Any idea why is happening?

 

Thanks

 

IMG_4544.JPG

9 REPLIES 9

Peter
Authority
Authority

It is the shutter curtain you see.

 

Did you use an external flash? If not it seems like a shutter failure or at least out of sync.

 

 

didakh
Apprentice
Hi Peter, is any way to sync by my self?
Thanks


@didakh wrote:
Hi Peter, is any way to sync by my self?
Thanks

$249 for the software. I wouldn´t do it. Better to send it to Canon.

TCampbell
Elite
Elite

An easy test would be to remove your lens, power on the camera, and navigate to the menu that lets you activate the manual sensor cleaning mode.  That mode tells the camera to raise the mirror and open the shutter -- and it just holds it open so that it can be cleaned. 

 

The reason you should do it, is because it will let you look into the camera and see if, in fact, the mirror does raise up completely clear and if the shutter opens completely.  

 

If not, the camera needs service.

 

Shutters are the one part on a DSLR camera that actually is expected to fail (it's considered normal).  But it's usually good for somewhere around 100,000 shutter activations (and is often much more) even on an entry-level camera and many high-end models are rated for significantly more.

 

If you use the flash, then there's a "sync" issue.  The flash is very fast ... often being illuminated for only around 1/1000th sec.  But the mechanical shutter can't actually open & close that fast.  On your T3i I think the fastest "sync" speed for flash is only 1/250th sec.  This gives the shutter time to completely open... then the flash can fire ... and then the shutter can close.  If you use faster speeds than the camera's rated maximum flash-sync speed the shutter wont actually be completely open when the flash fires and any part of the image that wasn't exposed when the flash fired will be black (or at least very dark).

 

In your image, the black area appears to be completely black (not just very dark).  This makes me suspicious that your shutter is sticking and that it wasn't a flash exposure at a speed faster than the flash-sync speed.

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

Did you have a speedlght attached?  Once I was getting images like that and assumed, like others here have, that it was a failing shutter. I realized though, that the speedlites had just slid backwards in the hotshoe, so some of the electrical contact pins weren't getting signal from the camera. The flash then couldn't sync with the shutter correctly and I was getting un-sync'ed images, catching the shutter in my shots. 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?

didakh
Apprentice
Hi ScottyP, no, the problem is one of the shutter stay stuck, I know now because I got another t3i today, I put both in movie mode and removed the lens, and I can see that one piece stay up.

Try blowing it out with some compressed air. On a camera as old as the T3, it is more than possible some dirt has built up on the mirror or shutter hardware. Blow it out with the mirror up and down; aiming at the sides. Hold the body so any dust will fall out. You may want to try it a couple of times, trying it out after each blowing. 

 

If that helps then great. If it doesn't, well you now have a $7 can of compressed air. 

 

Good luck.


@Mr_Fusion wrote:

Try blowing it out with some compressed air. On a camera as old as the T3, it is more than possible some dirt has built up on the mirror or shutter hardware. Blow it out with the mirror up and down; aiming at the sides. Hold the body so any dust will fall out. You may want to try it a couple of times, trying it out after each blowing. 

 

If that helps then great. If it doesn't, well you now have a $7 can of compressed air. 

 

Good luck.


Never spray compressed air inside of a camera body.  Because of complicated set of reasons that only scientists and engineers truly understand, compressed air leaves a residue behind, which does not evaporate.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

didakh
Apprentice
Ok, I do this issue for close, i know that it's a shutter problem. I already bought another t3i and I will keep this one for parts.
Thanks to everybody for your help
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