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When I am shooting film my Mark iii shuts off after a few minutes. WHY? Also It's not memory

JPhardboiled
Contributor

It seems like it's on some sort of auto shut off?

11 REPLIES 11

Danny
Moderator
Moderator

Hi, JPhardboiled!

So that the Community can help you better, we will need to know exactly which EOS camera model you're using, as we've made more than one model that has a "Mark III" designation. That, and any other details you'd like to give will help the Community better understand your issue!

If this is a time-sensitive matter, our US-based technical support team is standing by, ready to help 24/7 via Email at http://bit.ly/EmailCanon or by phone at 1-800-OK-CANON (1-800-652-2666) weekdays between 8 AM and midnight ET (5 AM to 9 PM PT) and weekends 10 AM to 8 PM ET (7 AM to 5 PM PT).

Thanks and have a great day!

jazzman1
Rising Star

@JPhardboiled wrote:

It seems like it's on some sort of auto shut off?


Just to add to the suggestion of Canon Rep.....Canon states in the manual of my camera (60D) when recording HD video the Camera may get hot, after a short time filming, and auto shutoff.   I believe it's a safety feature designed to prevent damage to the camera.

Tim
Authority

Hello JPhardboiled,

To save battery , the camera turns automatically after 1 minute of non-operation. To turn on the camera again, just press the shutter button halfway.

  • You can change the - time with [: ]

 

the - Time/

To save battery , the camera turns automatically after a time of idle operation elapses. If you do not want the camera to turn automatically, this to [Disable]. After the turns , you can turn on the camera again by pressing the shutter button or other buttons.

1 Select [ ].

  • Under the [] tab, select [ ], then press <>.

2 the desired time.

  • Select the desired , then press <>.


Even if [Disable] is , the LCD monitor will turn automatically after 30 min. to save . (The camera’s does not turn .)

Did this answer your question? Please click the Accept as Solution button so that others may find the answer as well.

nightphotog
Apprentice

I think your problem is that your trying to load film into a digital camera. These days we have something called memory cards which you load into the slot on the side of your camera that is designated for that memory card. I don't know how you were able to load film into the 5D Mark III but its probably not good. I recomend that you take the film out immediately and call canon for help or take it back to where you got it. I think you might of loaded the film into the battery slot and that is not the proper place to load film. In fact they don't even use film at all these days.

 

I hope my message was helpful and if you ever need any help figuring out things I'm here for you. Thank God you didn't try that with a Nikon or it would of most likely broken because of its cheap construction.


@nightphotog wrote:

I think your problem is that your trying to load film into a digital camera. These days we have something called memory cards which you load into the slot on the side of your camera that is designated for that memory card. I don't know how you were able to load film into the 5D Mark III but its probably not good. I recomend that you take the film out immediately and call canon for help or take it back to where you got it. I think you might of loaded the film into the battery slot and that is not the proper place to load film. In fact they don't even use film at all these days.

 

I hope my message was helpful and if you ever need any help figuring out things I'm here for you. Thank God you didn't try that with a Nikon or it would of most likely broken because of its cheap construction.


I think you need to cut the OP some slack. As still photographers, we may not be able to comprehend the mindset of wannabe vdeographers, who, after all, probably grew up going to brick-and-mortar "theaters" to watch celluloid "movies" projected on screens. It's possible that they have the word "film" programmed into their brains from birth.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

TCampbell
Elite
Elite

There's not enough info here.

 

If the camera was idle, then it most likely hit the auto power-off time.  

 

If the camera was recording video at the time, then it's very likely that the memory card can't keep up with the rate that the camera is trying to save frames of video.

 

The camera can shut down because of excessive heat (see page 215 of the manual where it describes the white bulb or red bulb icons to indicate internal temperature warnings.)  Usually it would require more than just a few minutes for this to occur (unless you are shooting in a rather hot location and/or the camera has been used for some time already and not allowed enough time to cool off.)

 

The memory card issue is usually the #1 cause.  I don't typically trust the labels on memory cards regarding their transfer speeds.  I have never had one of these video recording shut-off issues... but then I only use top performing cards.   If you want to shoot video, it doesn't pay to try to ecnomize on the cost of memory cards... get the best you buy.  I typically use Sandisk Extreme Pro cards.  Lexar's top cards also have a solid reputation.

 

I should re-emphasize... just because the label on the memory card claims it is fast enough... doesn't mean it's really fast enough.  I suspect many of those labels exaggerate the performance realities of the cards and sometimes they are dishonest and report the "read" speed and neglect to truthfully report the "write" speed (writing is always much slower than reading.)

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

johnnyquest
Contributor

1. Choose your Card Wisely.

if you are recording video to the sd card slot, the canon 5d mark3 will shut off because the the sd slot cannot write video to an sd card fast enough; the sd card slot was never designed to record video or even photos. if you try to record video to the sd card, it will sgtart recording, but when the buffer fills up, the camera will stop recording. even if you have a super fast sd card, the 5D will still stop recording when recording video; Canon did not design the sd card slot to record video (unfortunately). record video to the compact flash card, select the appropriate card slot. class10 udma7 / 800x / 120Mb/s is plenty fast for recording 1080p video on the 5D. 

 

2. Long Takes Heat Things Up Fast.

the mark3 will record video for 30min and then shut off to prevent overheating. pressing the record button right away, after the 5D stops recording after 30min will work, but eventually the camera will start to overheat and turn itself off during recording. if you are filming an event, where continuous recordingor hours on end is required, maybe the 5D is not the best choice of camera for this situation. the 5D is great for film sets where the takes are relatively short, allowing time for the camera to cool between takes. 

 


@johnnyquest wrote:

1. Choose your Card Wisely.

if you are recording video to the sd card slot, the canon 5d mark3 will shut off because the the sd slot cannot write video to an sd card fast enough; the sd card slot was never designed to record video or even photos. if you try to record video to the sd card, it will sgtart recording, but when the buffer fills up, the camera will stop recording. even if you have a super fast sd card, the 5D will still stop recording when recording video; Canon did not design the sd card slot to record video (unfortunately). record video to the compact flash card, select the appropriate card slot. class10 udma7 / 800x / 120Mb/s is plenty fast for recording 1080p video on the 5D. 

 

2. Long Takes Heat Things Up Fast.

the mark3 will record video for 30min and then shut off to prevent overheating. pressing the record button right away, after the 5D stops recording after 30min will work, but eventually the camera will start to overheat and turn itself off during recording. if you are filming an event, where continuous recordingor hours on end is required, maybe the 5D is not the best choice of camera for this situation. the 5D is great for film sets where the takes are relatively short, allowing time for the camera to cool between takes. 

 


No, the 30-minute shutoff is not to prevent overheating. It's to keep the camera from being taxed as a video camera in some countries that impose higher tariffs on video cameras than on still cameras.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

I have a T5 I have used for videos for 2 years. I am aware it will shut down after 11 minutes. I am aware it will when its hot. 

 

I am using a card supplied by Canon and has no issues.

 

Today for the first time ever, for no reason, in a cool space, it shuts off after a minute or two. Everything records fine, it just constantly turns off. One was 1 min 24 sec and the other was 1 min 46 sec. (I had already deleted 3 others about the same)

 

I re-formatted. I rechecked my settings (lowest HD setting)

 

And no, I didnt try to stuff film into it. I dont think everyone with a problem is an idiot.

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