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Seeking confirmation of a simple R6 AF solution

gbeinhorn
Apprentice

I've set the R6 to shoot in Face and Eye Tracking Servo mode by default. For still subjects, I press and hold the AF-ON button.

My question: is it really that easy? I've watched plenty of YouTube R6/R5 AF setup videos that recommend back-button focusing with AF-ON left at its default, and the * and AF point selection buttons assigned to switch to toggle tracking and Servo AF on/off. (I believe those are the recommended toggles.)

Of course I'll be field testing, just want to poll others' thoughts and experiences. Never hurts to ask for advice. I don't want to BB focus (except when pressing AF-ON to switch to single-point AF without tracking). Thanks.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

p4pictures
Enthusiast

In my view you can get a hundred replies to this question, all telling you the solution an individual is using. Reality is that the camera is very flexible with configuration of the buttons for all kinds of different capabilities.

In the past - EOS 5D4 / 7D2 - I used back button AF and mostly left the camera in servo focus. Press and hold the back button to activate tracking focus, press it then release it to be a little like one-shot AF. EOS R6 with its magic subject, face and eye detection has resulted in a change for me. I almost exclusively use the shutter button to activate focus, I use the camera in servo focus all the time - except for when I'm doing manual focus, and the AF-ON button is now set to be an AF-stop button. 

My working configuration also changes the operation of the SET, depth of field preview, M-Fn, AF point selection and movie buttons plus the multi-controller (joystick). Someone else may find it confusing, but it works for me and I get the photos I want to make. However I have reached my current button setup over a two year timescale. I made a few changes to start with then refined the configuration as I found new and, to me, better ways of working. 

The key is to work out what features suit the subjects you want to photograph, then decide how you want to interact with those features. Custom modes C1/C2/C3 can help, but the button configuration is the same for each of them.

Brian - Canon specialist trainer, author and photographer
https://www.p4pictures.com

View solution in original post

4 REPLIES 4

Waddizzle
Legend

Not only is it that easy, it is even easier than that. The shutter button has a half press and a full press action to it.  Half press the shutter, and the camera focuses.  Then, fully press the shutter button and the shutter should fire.

If you have not downloaded the full User Guide from the Canon Product Support page for your camera, then I strongly suggest that you do so.  It is the same page where you download apps.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Tronhard
Elite

A lot depends on what subjects one is going to shoot.   I shoot a range of scenarios that tend to lend themselves to different setups.

I consistently use back button focus with the button set to the ON/OFF setting, and I also leave the * as focus lock.  I generally use single point autofocus and single point metering.  This allows me to be very specific on what part of the image I want in focus (especially when there is limited Depth of Field) and also allows me to select any spot that has the right level of tonal value.   The sensor wants to make everything about 18% grey, and left to itself the sensor can select or include elements that will make it under or over-expose.  By having the ability to lock those, I can set what I want in two fast button presses 1 for focus and 1 for exposure.  I then recompose and take the shot.

In the following image, I was shooting hand-held in available light, but the subject was extremely small - this Auckland Green Gecko is barely 10cm (4") long, and the depth of field was extremely shallow.  Thus I had to be absolutely bang on with the eye (I used Animal Eye tracking in single point mode), The light was quite contrasty, so I locked exposure on the leaf stem directly to the left of its eye - so not the same point as the focus.  By quickly pressing the two buttons, side-by-side, I was able to set both and got the shot in one attempt.

Canon EOS R6, RF100-500@500mm, f/6.3, 1/500sec, ISO-3200Canon EOS R6, RF100-500@500mm, f/6.3, 1/500sec, ISO-3200

For general purpose imagery I use low speed shooting or single shot, no tracking, and have the servo autofocus and eye tracking turned off, and I generally work in aperture priority mode with auto ISO set with a maximum of 6400.  This is good for still subjects such as scenery and architecture.

Canon EOS R6, RF24-105 F4@41mm, f/8, 1/180sec, ISO-320Canon EOS R6, RF24-105 F4@41mm, f/8, 1/180sec, ISO-320

By recording to, and using the C1-3 settings I can have a range of settings that come into play just by turning the dial to match the shooting scenario that applies, rather than having to plough through menus to set up for a specific kind of shoot...

When shooting wildlife I have recorded the following settings and assigned them to the C1, custom settings button:
High speed shooting, Animal Eye tracking
In this shot the Red Panda was hidden by the foliage of the tree it likes to live in and peeked out only occasionally.  So, I had to be fast when it did so.   The animal eye tracking locked on immediately and was not distracted by closer, or other distracting elements that might have come into play if I had not used single point focus.

Canon EOS R6, RF 100-500@500, f/8, 1/500sec, ISO-6400Canon EOS R6, RF 100-500@500, f/8, 1/500sec, ISO-6400C2 is assigned to much the same, but changed from Animal eye tracking to human eye tracking.
C3 is again the same but set to no specific tracking scenario.  One could alternatively use that for people in vehicles, for example.

So the camera takes on different personalities depending upon the settings loaded into the C1-C3. To return the camera to general-purpose use I just return the dial to Av, Tv, or M.


cheers, TREVOR

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

p4pictures
Enthusiast

In my view you can get a hundred replies to this question, all telling you the solution an individual is using. Reality is that the camera is very flexible with configuration of the buttons for all kinds of different capabilities.

In the past - EOS 5D4 / 7D2 - I used back button AF and mostly left the camera in servo focus. Press and hold the back button to activate tracking focus, press it then release it to be a little like one-shot AF. EOS R6 with its magic subject, face and eye detection has resulted in a change for me. I almost exclusively use the shutter button to activate focus, I use the camera in servo focus all the time - except for when I'm doing manual focus, and the AF-ON button is now set to be an AF-stop button. 

My working configuration also changes the operation of the SET, depth of field preview, M-Fn, AF point selection and movie buttons plus the multi-controller (joystick). Someone else may find it confusing, but it works for me and I get the photos I want to make. However I have reached my current button setup over a two year timescale. I made a few changes to start with then refined the configuration as I found new and, to me, better ways of working. 

The key is to work out what features suit the subjects you want to photograph, then decide how you want to interact with those features. Custom modes C1/C2/C3 can help, but the button configuration is the same for each of them.

Brian - Canon specialist trainer, author and photographer
https://www.p4pictures.com

runbei
Contributor

My goodness, you guys are all amazing! Thank you so much. I'm very happy with the R6! Your sample photos are wonderful and instructive. Brian, I'm a huge fan of the EF 135 F/2L also. It's on my "buy" list for the R6 with adapter. I've always felt that it has a unique ability to bring out the humanity in a person, just wonderful. Also terrific for stage events - F/2 or F/2.8 at 1/1250 or faster with stage lighting makes me smile. I'll be hanging out on your website .... a lot. Thanks again. - George

 

 

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