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R6 Mark II and EF 24-105 (original) constantly fighting IS

meesterJ
Apprentice

I just paired my EF 24-105 F4.0 L (Original) to my new R6 Mark II using the RF-EF adaptor.  When I turn on the camera and touch the trigger button, the lens IS is constantly working away and won't stop making faint noises even after taking a picture.  I turned off Lens IS and the sound goes away -- hopefully saving battery life.

Is this a problem with my Lens or is this how the lens IS and camera IS interact?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION


@Waddizzle wrote:

Peter is correct. The setting is called “Continuous AF”. Disable it. 


Except in the R6 II, they moved and renamed it to "Preview AF". Same function, so I'm not sure why they did that... I guess to keep you on your toes, heh. Page 501 in the manual.

Newton

EOS R5, R6, R6II. RF 15-35 f/2.8L, 50mm f/1.2L, 85mm f/1.2L, 100mm f/2.8L Macro, 100-400mm, 100-500mm L, 1.4X.

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10 REPLIES 10

stevet1
Whiz
Whiz

meesterJ,

I think this is normal, and that's why they advocate that you turn off your IS when using a tripod.

Steve Thomas

Thanks Steve -- however, this is just holding the camera in my hand without having yet pressed the trigger ... just on power on.  From what I've read, the body IS and Len IS are supposed to work in sync to provide better IS when taking a picture.   I'm just curious to know if this is normal behaviour or if I've got an IS Issue in my lens... however, it does not do the same when I mount my EF lens to my other EF DSLR (6D MkII) -- it's just nice and quiet and IS just kicks in when I'm taking a picture.

So for now, I've turned off my lens IS and will rely on body IS in order to save battery life but would definitely prefer the two to work together for better IS overall.

meesterJ,,

If you don't have an issue with the EF lens working on the EF mount camera, I wonder if it's got something to do with your lens working with the adapter.

I think I agree with the others though. Try turning your Continuous AF off, and see if it makes a difference.

Steve Thomas

Peter
Authority
Authority

That is how Canon mirrorless cameras work.

Peter is correct. The setting is called “Continuous AF”. Disable it. 

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"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

Peter is correct. The setting is called “Continuous AF”. Disable it. 


Except in the R6 II, they moved and renamed it to "Preview AF". Same function, so I'm not sure why they did that... I guess to keep you on your toes, heh. Page 501 in the manual.

Newton

EOS R5, R6, R6II. RF 15-35 f/2.8L, 50mm f/1.2L, 85mm f/1.2L, 100mm f/2.8L Macro, 100-400mm, 100-500mm L, 1.4X.


@FloridaDrafter wrote:

@Waddizzle wrote:

Peter is correct. The setting is called “Continuous AF”. Disable it. 


Except in the R6 II, they moved and renamed it to "Preview AF". Same function, so I'm not sure why they did that... I guess to keep you on your toes, heh. Page 501 in the manual.

Newton


I think you’re correct.  If I had to venture a guess to explain the change it is because of the “pre-shot” buffer feature, or whatever it is they call it.

When you are in Servo AF and Continuous Drive mode the camera can capture up to a 0.5 second of photos prior to the start of your burst.  This feature would not be possible if “Preview AF” were disabled.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

"... but would definitely prefer the two to work together for better IS overall."

 

Depending on the SS, the IS works at varying levels. If you are shooting at 1/250 or 1/500 or faster for instance IS is pretty useless. It is only when you are shooting at slow to very slow SS that IS is a benefit.

BTW, I personally never turn IS off when using a tripod and have never see any impact on the image. I mean I don't leave it on just because I just don't care as it just never seems to bother or be a factor.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"... but would definitely prefer the two to work together for better IS overall."

 

Depending on the SS, the IS works at varying levels. If you are shooting at 1/250 or 1/500 or faster for instance IS is pretty useless. It is only when you are shooting at slow to very slow SS that IS is a benefit.

BTW, I personally never turn IS off when using a tripod and have never see any impact on the image. I mean I don't leave it on just because I just don't care as it just never seems to bother or be a factor.


Have you ever looked at the EXIF data to see if the IS is being reported as enabled or disabled when you shoot from a tripod?

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"The right mouse button is your friend."
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