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Low Light Landscape Photography

Kisola1975
Apprentice
What camera would work best for low light landscape photos? I’m currently shooting a 5D MII and need an upgrade.
Thanks
K
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

@Kisola1975 wrote:
What camera would work best for low light landscape photos? I’m currently shooting a 5D MII and need an upgrade.
Thanks
K

I started working as a landscape, travel and wildlife photographer about 40 years ago, so I hope I have some experience to draw upon in my opinion. 

 

Personally, without inquiring further into what you produce - particulaly in terms of image size, I would recommend the Canon EOS R6.  The sensors on the new crop of MILCs are really excellent for low-light work.  Now, the R5 has more pixels at 45MP, but reviews, and my own experience. is that the R6's 20MP has about 1 EV, better performance.  I have both units and they are excellent.

 

I would suggest watching THIS review by Gordon Laing.

 

 


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

View solution in original post

I have the EOS 5DMkIII, IV, DsR and the R5 and R6 units.  I still shoot with all of them and I would be the last to say that they are not all great cameras.  However, the question, as I understand it, is what should one invest in if seeking to make a long-term purchase for landscape that will provide high-quality prints, work with existing optics but be able to take advantage of future developments in optics (since this is a long-term thing).

 

Without doubt, using a tripod is a habit I would expect experienced landscape photographers to embrace, so I didn't press that one.  One can STILL get good images from any of the above units.  However, it is clear that the new generation of sensors from the latest generation of MILCs is superior to the old ones and there are other benefits as well.  That is why I provided the link to the review so that the OP could make up their own mind based on documented testing and not just our opinions: which I think is the best service we can render.

There are other benefits to going to the R-series.  The legacy EF lenses will work perfectly fine with the new bodies, via the Canon EF-RF lens adapters, however it is clear that the new line-up of superior optics is going to be in the RF lens catalogue, so embracing the R-mount is an investment in the future as well as securing the past.

I am not sure about my esteemed colleagues, I am speaking from extensive use and testing of these bodies with different lenses (see my profile for my rather extensive gear list) so I am speaking form personal experience as well as relying on unbiased reviews.  For further ones I recommend checking out Dustin Abbott's You Tube reviews of the R bodies and lenses.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

View solution in original post

26 REPLIES 26

I have the EOS 5DMkIII, IV, DsR and the R5 and R6 units.  I still shoot with all of them and I would be the last to say that they are not all great cameras.  However, the question, as I understand it, is what should one invest in if seeking to make a long-term purchase for landscape that will provide high-quality prints, work with existing optics but be able to take advantage of future developments in optics (since this is a long-term thing).

 

Without doubt, using a tripod is a habit I would expect experienced landscape photographers to embrace, so I didn't press that one.  One can STILL get good images from any of the above units.  However, it is clear that the new generation of sensors from the latest generation of MILCs is superior to the old ones and there are other benefits as well.  That is why I provided the link to the review so that the OP could make up their own mind based on documented testing and not just our opinions: which I think is the best service we can render.

There are other benefits to going to the R-series.  The legacy EF lenses will work perfectly fine with the new bodies, via the Canon EF-RF lens adapters, however it is clear that the new line-up of superior optics is going to be in the RF lens catalogue, so embracing the R-mount is an investment in the future as well as securing the past.

I am not sure about my esteemed colleagues, I am speaking from extensive use and testing of these bodies with different lenses (see my profile for my rather extensive gear list) so I am speaking form personal experience as well as relying on unbiased reviews.  For further ones I recommend checking out Dustin Abbott's You Tube reviews of the R bodies and lenses.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris


@shadowsports wrote:

@ebiggs1 wrote:

5D Mk IV and a tripod!  Smiley Happy  That is the best solution, IMHO, of course.


+1 on ebiggs1 recommendation.

 

If you print big<<  Then the 5D4 wins over the R6.


(added to previous post, but in case you missed it)

I have the EOS 5DMkIII, IV, DsR and the R5 and R6 units.  I still shoot with all of them and I would be the last to say that they are not all great cameras.  However, the question, as I understand it, is what should one invest in if seeking to make a long-term purchase for landscape that will provide high-quality prints, work with existing lenses but be able to take advantage of future developments in optics (since this is a long-term thing).

 

If the intent is to produce large, high-resolution images, the R5 at 45MP will beat the 5DIV at 30MP, the only higher alternative in the DSLR line is the 5Ds or 5DsR at 52MP.   Great camera, but older technology and the DR is not a competitor to the new sensor in the R5.  The sensor in the R6 is essentially the same as that in the 1DXMkIII, which was Canon's flagship DSLR until their new MILCs came along.

 

There is an article on the R5 specifically on landscape use HERE 

Dustin Abbott definitive review of the Canon EOS R5 HERE 

Dustin Abbott definitive review of the Canon EOS R6 HERE 

 

However, landscape photography is not simply reliant on the camera sensor, it is highly dependent on the quality of the lenses.  If the intent is to use this camera for some time, then being able to take advantage of the new, extremely high-quality RF lenses becomes a significant factor.  One can mount legacy EF on the RF bodies but not RF on EF.  RF lenses are where Canon is investing its R&D, and we have seen no new EF lenses for a couple of years.

 

Personally, I also appreciate the ability to use the tilt and rotate features of the screens of the R-series bodies.  Great for when one is having to go low or high.

 

ADDITIONAL Link:
A comparison with image evaluations between the EOS 5DsR, R and R5, being all high resolution sensors. HERE 

Dynamic Range is another critical element in landscape imagery, and the following is an evaluation of that in the the Canon EOS R5 HERE 

 


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Bella8Corey
Apprentice

I personally use this camera! EOS 5D Mark IV EF 24-105mm f / 4L IS II USM Lens Kit and they suit me perfectly! And then there are many opinions here and here! And even the best answer is here! But this is my point of view!


@Bella8Corey wrote:

I personally use this camera! EOS 5D Mark IV EF 24-105mm f / 4L IS II USM Lens Kit and they suit me perfectly! And then there are many opinions here and there! And even the best answer is here! But this is my point of view!


Good to get your feedback.  Can you please explain the context in which you use your camera and lens? e.g. what do  you photograph, and what do you produce in terms of type and size of output.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

I can't explain, I just like this camera and it's very convenient)))))


@Bella8Corey wrote:

I can't explain, I just like this camera and it's very convenient)))))


For someone seeking advice, it is critical that any recommendation be specifically targeted to their situation. 

 

That is why, if you look at my posts, I clearly state the premise for my recommendations and my experience in providing such to make sure the person seeking advice can establish the relevance of the advice for their needs.  One of the biggest traps a person seeking advice is to buy something that suits someone else's needs and not their own. 

 

In this case, as I understand it, it is a low-light landscape photographer who wants large, high-quality prints and who is not likely to want to change their camera frequently.  This implies a large sensor with great dynamic range, a pretty large pixel count and the ability to add new lenses as required.

 

 


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

HERE is a link to a document I created for those seeking to get (or give) advice on the purchase of camera equipment.

 

I think it covers most of the questions that need to be addressed, but in particular is the issue of the camera as a system (as mentioned).  If one is going to have a camera body as a long-term investment, it is important to consider the potential to be able to add new optics as they become available.  It is for that reason, in particular, that I have recommended the R mount in this case, as the EF mount seems to have reached a development dead end.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

"@Bella8Corey wrote:

I can't explain, I just like this camera and it's very convenient)))))"

 

Most likely explanation is, it is, and will always be, a great camera.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Lowlight wide-angle landscapes. Sunsets and valleys. Very large prints.

 

Thanks

K

If you a going to print big, the more pixels, the better. I get good results with my 5Ds and tripod. How big are your prints?

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