cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

I am using a 5D Mark II and I am getting a series of three curved lines on the photos that are under

JSewell
Contributor

I am using a 5D Mark II and I am getting a series of three curved lines on the photos that are under exposed only.  Can anyone help me figure out why it is doing this?

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 12.15.41 PM 2.jpg

16 REPLIES 16

cale_kat
Mentor

It isn't that uncommon to have banding in scenes which have high contrast content, difficult lighting (such as shooting into the sun), the degree of enlargement, and/or the shooting environment. The circlular shapes points to a lens derived effect.

Thanks for the response.  What about this example..?  More subtle, but the effect is popping up seemingly randomly (commonly on underexposed photos) and on various lenses.  Screen Shot 2014-08-14 at 12.48.42 PM.png

A damaged sensor, struck by a laser reflection that left a pattern? I'm grasping at straws. Sorry. Smiley Sad

JSewell,

 

  1. Does this happen when you shoot indoors out of the sunlight?
  2. Do you have any filters attached to your lenses?

 

Did this answer your question? Please click the Accept as Solution button so that others may find the answer as well.

1. I am almost always using a filter (in these examples I know was)

 

2.  I never use filters attached to my lenses.

Stray light.

Are you using your lens' hood's?  You should always use the hood unless you have a direct reason to not.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@JSewell wrote:

Thanks for the response.  What about this example..?  More subtle, but the effect is popping up seemingly randomly (commonly on underexposed photos) and on various lenses.  Screen Shot 2014-08-14 at 12.48.42 PM.png


That picture is certainly not underexposed. It's not obvious that the phenomenon, whatever it is, is exposure-dependent. It could be that the lines, being fairly bright, are simply more prominent against a darker image.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@JSewell wrote:

Thanks for the response.  What about this example..?  More subtle, but the effect is popping up seemingly randomly (commonly on underexposed photos) and on various lenses.  Screen Shot 2014-08-14 at 12.48.42 PM.png


That picture is certainly not underexposed. It's not obvious that the phenomenon, whatever it is, is exposure-dependent. It could be that the lines, being fairly bright, are simply more prominent against a darker image.


I think the degree to which it is noticeable is exposure dependent but it appears, at least from the two samples shown, that it never goes away.

Everything on the sensor is going to be organized in rows and columns. You can get a bad pixel or a column of bad pixels... or perhaps even a block ... but not a curve. If you're seeing a curve then certainly there must be something else causing this.

The camera does have two internal filters in front of the sensor, but those are flat and would probably not be the source of a curved reflection.

If you are confident this happens with more than one lens, then I might remove the lens and use the menu system to put the camera into manual "sensor cleaning" mode. This really just causes the mirror to swing clear (to the roof the chamber) and also causes the shutter door to open and expose the sensor (although the sensor is actually powered down when in "cleaning" mode). This would allow you to visually check to make sure nothing is hanging in the light path.

I would normally suspect the problem is caused either by the lens or possibly by a filter mounted on the front of the lens (do you use any type of UV filter or other filter when this happens?) The lens itself is curved glass... but since a "filter" would be flat glass in front of the curved glass, a reflection off the curved glass can bounce back off the filter and into the camera. Many "ghosting" problems are caused by the use of filters (and these can be eliminated by removing the filter or reduced by using filters with anti-reflective coatings.)

Hopefully you can the solution -- but I would probably be looking at the optics as I suspect this is not related to the camera body.
Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Announcements
06/10/2022: Service Notice:UPDATE: Canon Inkjet Printer continuous reboot loop or powering down
06/07/2022: New firmware version 1.3.2 is available for PowerShot G7 X Mark III
06/07/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3 is available for EOS M50 Mark II
05/31/2022: Did someone SAY Badges?
05/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.5.1 is available for EOS-C500 Mark II
05/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3.1 is available for EOS-C300 Mark III
05/10/2022: Keep your Canon gear in optimal condition with a Canon Maintenance Service
05/05/2022: We are excited to announce that we have refreshed the ranking scale within the community!
04/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.1.1 is available for EOS R5 C
03/23/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3.1 is available for EOS-C70
03/22/2022: New firmware version 1.2.0 is available for PowerShot PICK
03/16/2022: New firmware version 1.5.2 is available for EOS-R5
03/16/2022: New firmware version 1.5.2 is available for EOS-R6
02/09/2022: Share Your Photos is back!
02/07/2022: New firmware version 1.1.1 is available for EOS-R3
02/07/2022: New firmware version 1.6.1 is available for EOS-1DX Mark III
01/19/2022: READY FOR ANYTHING EOS-R5 C
01/13/2022: Community Update. We will be retiring the legacy profile avatars on 01/20/2022. Click this link to read more.
01/05/2022: Welcome to CES 2022!
12/7/2021: New firmware version 1.3.0 is available for Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x
12/7/2021: New firmware version 1.1.1 is available for CR-N 300
12/7/2021: New firmware version 1.1.1 is available for CR-N 500
12/2/2021: New firmware version 1.1.0 is available for RF 70-200 F4 L IS USM