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EOS R6 Mark II: How to maintain settings between photo and video mode

Haugen
Apprentice

Is there any way to not have separate settings for photo and video mode?

If I change my settings (ISO, aperture, shutter and WB) in video mode, I also have to do this in photo mode. Why is there separate settings for each mode? I want to turn it off. Is it possible?

6 REPLIES 6

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

Which camera are you using?  You can define a Custom Shooting Mode with advanced models.

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Ah, forgot the camera. R6 II. When I'm out working or travel I often switch between video and stills, under the same lightning conditions. Therefor I want the settings for stills and videos to be the same. I don't care about the 180 degree shutter rule. I love shooting wide open. 1.8 or even 1.4, and for my work I don't need the 180 degree. Therefor, for me, the settings for video can be the same as stills. That's why I want the same settings for both modes. Is it possible to lock the settings for both modes?

stevet1
Whiz
Whiz

Haugen,

For one thing, I think your shooting conditions might be different.

For example, many people recommend, that to ensure the smoothest flow of movement, you set your shutter speed to 2 times your frame rate; i.e. when shooting at 30 frames per second (30fps), set your shutter speed to 1/60th.

But, if you went to shoot a still photo in broad daylight at 1/60th, it will probably be all washed out.

A lot of people will put a 3 stop ND filter on when shooting video for just that reason -

Steve Thomas

p4pictures
Whiz
Whiz

Typically video requires different settings to still photography and this is why the settings for ISO/Aperture/Shutter Speed are not shared between still and video modes. When shooting video the shutter speed is typically 2x the frame rate of the movie, so capturing at 30fps would require a 1/60th shutter speed. This may create more motion blur in a still image yet in video a little blur helps the motion look smoother.

As already mentioned by Waddizle some of the cameras with custom shooting modes would allow the settings to be preset in a custom mode and when switching from video to stills the values could be the same. EOS R6 Mark II is such a camera. However if you change the setting in the C1/C2/C3 modes while shooting stills it does not update the stored settings in the video C1/C2/C3 modes. The camera has 3 custom modes for stills and 3 more for video but they are not linked. 


Brian
EOS specialist trainer, photographer and author

BurnUnit
Whiz
Whiz

As a rule, still photos can be shot using a wider range of ISO, aperture and shutter speed settings. In my limited experience video seems to be a bit more restrictive, especially with regard to shutter speeds. Video shooting adds the extra complication of frame rates which don't affect still photography. Then there's a big difference in exposure requirements between shooting outdoors in daylight and indoors under artificial lighting. And also there's the added complications of still flash photography.

Unless you're always shooting all your photos and videos under the same lighting conditions you'll still need to make the necessary exposure adjustments.


@BurnUnit wrote:

As a rule, still photos can be shot using a wider range of ISO, aperture and shutter speed settings. In my limited experience video seems to be a bit more restrictive, especially with regard to shutter speeds. Video shooting adds the extra complication of frame rates which don't affect still photography. Then there's a big difference in exposure requirements between shooting outdoors in daylight and indoors under artificial lighting. And also there's the added complications of still flash photography.

Unless you're always shooting all your photos and videos under the same lighting conditions you'll still need to make the necessary exposure adjustments.


Video frame rates may not as restrictive as you seem to suggest.  While it is true that frame rates restrict how slow of a shutter speed you can effectively use, there is [no] limitation on how fast of a shutter speed you can use.

Faster shutter speeds reduce motion blur.  Very fast shutter speeds can remove it entirely, which creates interesting cinematography effects.  You can crank shutter speeds up to 1/600 or faster.

Examples of this special effect can be seen in the opening beach landing scene in “Saving Private Ryan” and many of the battle sequences in “300”.  More recently, some battle scenes in “Game of Thrones” were shot this way.

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