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Desaturated green on 5D MK II

John_Wells
Apprentice

Shooting in the Palouse of E. Washington, which is very green right now, I noticed that the greens displayed on the lcd and in downloaded raw are much less saturated. WB setting is auto, color space is Adobe RGB. shooting in sunlight, late afternoon. I can correct in PS, but am curious as to why this might be happening. I suppose i could change WB settings to shade, but would rather not.

Thanks

10 REPLIES 10

kvbarkley
VIP

Do you have a picture style set?

it is set to F

lly3988
Rising Star

Have you tried switching the color space to sRGB and is there a difference ?

TCampbell
Elite

When shooting and save files as ‘RAW’ the image data isn’t altered ... regardless of white balance settings, picture styles, etc..  The camera will record the settings to the meta-data ... and software that processes the RAW files on your computer might take those into consideration and apply changes, but the camera will not.

 

The whole point of a ‘RAW’ file is to capture the data from the sensor... and decide what you want to do with the data later.  This way nothing is lost.  No decisions are made by the camera that discards data or alters in it a way that it’s not possible to know what the original data was.

 

 

 

I have owned a 5D II (sold it), then a 5D III (still have it) and a 5D IV (which I currently use the most).  The first time I saw images looking not quite right on the 5D II LCD screen, I started making changes to the exposure settings.  Turns out that was a really bad idea.  The LCD doesn’t accurately reflect the image the camera captured.  If you have doubts about an image (while reviewing on the camera), check the histogram displays.

 

Also, your imagination can betray you.  I recall shooting a landscape... getting back to my computer, and thinking the colors looked a bit flat.  I had to adjust the image a bit to get what I had recalled in my memory.  But a few days later I drove by that same landscape, so I stopped to compare what the camera took to the actual landscape.  Turns out the camera was pretty accurate.  My brain had imagined the scene to be more vibrant than it really was.    (Your brain is not necessarily to be trusted about telling the truth.)

 

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

My understanding of RAW is that what the sensor sees is what is displayed on the lcd and in the file, regardless of picture settings. The image I saw with my eyes, and through the lens, and on the photo I took with my Android phone, is not the image that was displayed in live view, or in the RAW file when I open in PS. I can pretty well correct with the yellow hue slider in RAW import, but that seems kind of a funky way to do it. 

"My understanding of RAW is that what the sensor sees is what is displayed on the lcd ..."

 

No you are mistaken.  Like Tim C. said Raw has to be processed before it can be viewed.  You can not view a Raw file.  It is nothing but ones and zeros.  Whether on your LCD or computer it is converted and the settings you made are what the processors use.

 

Changing your color space to sRGB won't make any difference either.  Most monitors can not display AdobeRGB in the first place.  They say that some photo printers can benefit from using AdobeRGB but I am not sure of that either.

 

"I can pretty well correct with the yellow hue slider in RAW import, ..."  That is precisely why you shoot Raw so you can do that post editing to a greater degree.  Be glad you can!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@John_Wells wrote:

My understanding of RAW is that what the sensor sees is what is displayed on the lcd and in the file, regardless of picture settings. The image I saw with my eyes, and through the lens, and on the photo I took with my Android phone, is not the image that was displayed in live view, or in the RAW file when I open in PS. I can pretty well correct with the yellow hue slider in RAW import, but that seems kind of a funky way to do it. 


Open the RAW file in DPP and try different picture styles. Some of them exaggerate or (by comparison) desaturate green

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

If you normally shoot with Standard or landscape PS then Faithful will look "dull".

 

http://www.canon.co.jp/imaging/picturestyle/style/faithful.html

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

I have read that information about F vs L, and experimented with using both, viewing them on the lcd, then opening in ps. but i don't see that much of a difference. nevertheless, for now, will keep mode in L.

 

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