cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Currently using 90D thinking of adding an R6 Mark ii

manfred9
Contributor

A bit of background - I have been using Canon cameras since AE-1. Lost interest a few years ago and sold all my equipment. But with the lockdowns I started again and got myself the 90D with a few lenses.

I am shooting for my own entertainment and keep some memories recorded while getting older :-).

My question now is, if I go down that path and buy a mirrorless fullframe, will there still be occasions to use my 90D. I like the 90D and I don't want it to be "sunken costs".

I am addressing people having a fullframe mirorless camera and a 90D - do you use both or only the full frame?

Thanks for sharing your experience.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

p4pictures
Whiz
Whiz

I'm slightly out of your desired market segment, but my experience is that once you go to mirrorless then the DSLR is likely to sit on the shelf. 

Before the EOS R system was launched I had an Eos 7D Mark II and EOS 5D Mark IV. When the EOS R came along I disliked the camera initially as it wasn't as broadly capable as the EOS 5D Mark IV. However  needing to be up to date with product knowledge I purchased an EOS R. Over a year of using forcing myself to use both the 5D4 and the EOS R I found that I used the EOS R more. When the EOS R6/R5 arrived I sold my EOS 5D Mark IV, and also the EOS R.

I teach Canon users about their cameras and help them get the most from them. I still keep an EOS 7D Mark II as I can use it to train clients with 5D4 / 5Ds / 1DX / 1DX2 about the AF systems as they are largely similar. Now I have EOS R6, EOS R10 and EOS R6 Mark II as these cover the three different kinds of AF systems in use for mirrorless models. 

So now I'm mostly using the EOS R6 Mark II, but often the other camera in my bag is the EOS R10. Largely the EOS R6 is used for training clients, and article writing, but even then it does get taken along to some photoshoots when I want to have two full-frame cameras, usually with different lenses. 

 


Brian
EOS specialist trainer, photographer and author
-- Note: my spell checker is set for EN-GB, not EN-US --

View solution in original post

6 REPLIES 6

p4pictures
Whiz
Whiz

I'm slightly out of your desired market segment, but my experience is that once you go to mirrorless then the DSLR is likely to sit on the shelf. 

Before the EOS R system was launched I had an Eos 7D Mark II and EOS 5D Mark IV. When the EOS R came along I disliked the camera initially as it wasn't as broadly capable as the EOS 5D Mark IV. However  needing to be up to date with product knowledge I purchased an EOS R. Over a year of using forcing myself to use both the 5D4 and the EOS R I found that I used the EOS R more. When the EOS R6/R5 arrived I sold my EOS 5D Mark IV, and also the EOS R.

I teach Canon users about their cameras and help them get the most from them. I still keep an EOS 7D Mark II as I can use it to train clients with 5D4 / 5Ds / 1DX / 1DX2 about the AF systems as they are largely similar. Now I have EOS R6, EOS R10 and EOS R6 Mark II as these cover the three different kinds of AF systems in use for mirrorless models. 

So now I'm mostly using the EOS R6 Mark II, but often the other camera in my bag is the EOS R10. Largely the EOS R6 is used for training clients, and article writing, but even then it does get taken along to some photoshoots when I want to have two full-frame cameras, usually with different lenses. 

 


Brian
EOS specialist trainer, photographer and author
-- Note: my spell checker is set for EN-GB, not EN-US --

justadude
Rising Star
Rising Star

If you were shooting professionally, I would say the 90D would be a good second body.  Since you are doing this as a hobby, and for your own entertainment, have you considered trading it in at a local camera shop, and having it go towards the purchase of a Canon mirrorless?  I ended up trading in a Canon 6D towards the R6 Mk ll simply because ever since I bought the Canon RP in 2019, this camera just sat collecting dust.

The best way to find out the value of a used camera is to look on eBay, and find the average selling price.  Most cameras shops will do exactly this if you are trading one in.  Then the camera shop will typically offer you about 75% of that value... which to me is worth it, simply to avoid the hassle of selling it yourself.  I traded in a few lenses that were no longer being used as well.  


Gary

Digital: Canon: R6 Mk ll, R8, RP, 60D, various lenses
Film: (still using) Pentax: Spotmatic, K1000, K2000, Miranda: DR, Zenit: 12XP, Kodak: Retina Automatic II, Duaflex III

johnrmoyer
Whiz
Whiz

When I got my EOS R5 I did not sell my EOS 80D or any of my lenses. I still occasionally use my EOS 80D, but not often. I use my old full frame lenses on my EOS R5 and occasionally I use the APS-C lenses in crop mode on my EOS R5. If you do not have any full frame lenses, a crop sensor R series camera might be better.

manfred9
Contributor

Thanks for all of your comments. It looks like the best way would be to sell the 90D and go with the R6 Mkii only. I had two bodies in the past but I never took both of them out for a shooting, preferred to have an extra lens in the bag.

All my lenses are capable for full frame so that is not an issue.

Thanks again.

Since it sounds like you are keeping some of the full frame EF lenses (I kept my best ones as well), just be sure to buy the Canon brand EF to RF adaptor.  Some of the third party brands have various compatibility issues.  


Gary

Digital: Canon: R6 Mk ll, R8, RP, 60D, various lenses
Film: (still using) Pentax: Spotmatic, K1000, K2000, Miranda: DR, Zenit: 12XP, Kodak: Retina Automatic II, Duaflex III

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

Hi Manfred:
I have a situation very close to yours.  I had a lot of DSLR gear, and disposed about 90% of it when I went to mirrorless.   However, I kept one of my 80D cameras and a kit (18-135 USM) lens just because I like to use it - it's more tactile than technical.   I shoot exclusively R-series FF cameras: R5, 2xR6 and R6II and use them the vast majority of the time.   Do I still go back to that DSLR - yes, I do, but not frequently.   One other factor is that I still have a FF DSLR (5DsR) and several L-series lenses that will work on both DSLRs and MILC bodies, so I have a lot of options for the 80D.  BTW, I did have a 90D but sold that as I personally preferred the 80D, but the principle is still the same.   

Certainly, if the 90D gave you acceptable photos before, it's performance will not have changed, it is still as good as it ever was, but it is possible that after using the R-series bodies your expectations may.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
Avatar
click here to view the gallery
Announcements