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[Canon T6] Yellow tint?

TheEnforcer
New Contributor

When I take a picture on my camera it looks like it has a yellow tint on my camera but when I export it to my computer it may look normal (as I see it).

 

When I take a picture on my camera and it looks normal it may produce a yellow tint when I convert it from CR2 (RAW) to JPEG.

 

What are the solutions to these very annoying issues? Thank you.

9 REPLIES 9

ebiggs1
Forum Elite

Check your WB (white balance) settings.

"... when I convert it from CR2 (RAW) to JPEG."     Remember when you shoot RAW there is no WB, or most other camera settings for than matter.  Everything is set in post.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

TheEnforcer
New Contributor
So what is raw for then? Should I not shoot in raw as suggested?

RAW is exactly what it's name implies.  It is the the raw digital data the sensor captures.  In most cases it is the best format to shoot in.  However, it requires post editing.  This is because the camera settings are not saved in the RAW file.  The camera saves a small meta data tag file that tells your viewer how to display the image.  Whether it is the camera's LCD or your computer, etc.  If it did not, you could not view a raw file as it is just data, ones and zeros.

 

You got a decent post editor with the camera.  It is called DPP4.  There are better commercial ones but DPP4 can do a nice job of post editing.  But you must tell it what you want. There is no real reason not to use RAW as it is mostly seamless any more.  If you choose not to shoot RAW, you must get the settings right in the camera.

 

In your post you said there was a yellow tint.  This is possibly because the WB setting in the camera was wrong for the type light you shot the photo in.  Set the camera WB to 'daylight' and go outside on a bright day and try a shot.  If the color is now correct, it was most certainly the WB setting.

 

A sample of the photo in question would be helpful.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

ScottyP
Respected Contributor

The plus side to RAW is that RAW allows you to start with all the data the camera can capture and use your own judgment and effort. in post processing to make the picture look the way you want it to. 

 

The down side to RAW, if you view it as such, is that RAW allows you to start with all the data the camera can capture and use your own judgment and effort. in post processing to make the picture look the way you want it to.

 

The yellowing problem you describe is just an improper white balance setting.  You should actually be very happy you are shooting in RAW because you have all the data to work with and you can make radical adjustments to white balance.  Had you shot in JPEG the camera would have guessed at the right white balance and then thrown away half the data you would have been able to work with if you were capturing in RAW, and that kind of limits you in how much you can change the white balance (and the exposure and etc, etc,...).

 

If you don't already have it I suggest you get Lightroom for post processing. These corrections are really simple in Lightroom. 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?

RobertTheFat
Honored Contributor

@ScottyP wrote:

The plus side to RAW is that RAW allows you to start with all the data the camera can capture and use your own judgment and effort. in post processing to make the picture look the way you want it to. 

 

The down side to RAW, if you view it as such, is that RAW allows you to start with all the data the camera can capture and use your own judgment and effort. in post processing to make the picture look the way you want it to.

 

The yellowing problem you describe is just an improper white balance setting.  You should actually be very happy you are shooting in RAW because you have all the data to work with and you can make radical adjustments to white balance.  Had you shot in JPEG the camera would have guessed at the right white balance and then thrown away half the data you would have been able to work with if you were capturing in RAW, and that kind of limits you in how much you can change the white balance (and the exposure and etc, etc,...).

 

If you don't already have it I suggest you get Lightroom for post processing. These corrections are really simple in Lightroom. 


White balance corrections are just as simple in Digital Photo Professional V4 as they are in Lightroom. Both DPP and LR have advantages and drawbacks, but one advantage of DPP is that it's free with a Canon camera. So my advice is to use DPP unless and until you find that you really need some of the features of LR that DPP lacks, then switch.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

And using DPP makes this statement by ebiggs false:

"This is because the camera settings are not saved in the RAW file."

 

All the camera settings are saved in the raw file - though Canon might be the only one who can read them. DPP can make a JPEG from the RAW just like the camera would.

"And using DPP makes this statement by ebiggs false:

"This is because the camera settings are not saved in the RAW file."

 

For all practical purposes it is not false.  You may nit-pick the wording but the intent is correct.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@ScottyP wrote:

The plus side to RAW is that RAW allows you to start with all the data the camera can capture and use your own judgment and effort. in post processing to make the picture look the way you want it to. 

 

The down side to RAW, if you view it as such, is that RAW allows you to start with all the data the camera can capture and use your own judgment and effort. in post processing to make the picture look the way you want it to.

 

The yellowing problem you describe is just an improper white balance setting.  You should actually be very happy you are shooting in RAW because you have all the data to work with and you can make radical adjustments to white balance.  Had you shot in JPEG the camera would have guessed at the right white balance and then thrown away half the data you would have been able to work with if you were capturing in RAW, and that kind of limits you in how much you can change the white balance (and the exposure and etc, etc,...).

 

If you don't already have it I suggest you get Lightroom for post processing. These corrections are really simple in Lightroom. 


White balance corrections are just as simple in Digital Photo Professional V4 as they are in Lightroom. Both DPP and LR have advantages and drawbacks, but one advantage of DPP is that it's free with a Canon camera. So my advice is to use DPP unless and until you find that you really need some of the features of LR that DPP lacks, then switch.


One of the features that DPP lacks, and the main reason why I purchased LR, is lens compensation for third party lenses.  the ability to create collections was a bonus.  "Oh gee, look at how well it organizes photos!"  Plus, LR6 is fast.  LR6 can convert RAW to JPEGs about four times faster on my machine. 

One aspect of LR that noticed immediately, was the range of control of various settings, as well as the nuanced and sophisticated way in which you can make adjustments.  For example, DPP4 gives you +/-3 Ev of exposure control, while LR6 gives you +/-5 Ev of exposure control.  This extended range of adjustment can be found across the board.

 

Instead of one slider for Luminance or Chrominance noise reduction in DPP4, LR6 gives you three sliders for each type of noise reduction.  The overall differences between DPP4 and LR6 are like night and day.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."


@TheEnforcer wrote:
So what is raw for then? Should I not shoot in raw as suggested?

Yes, for most everyday shooting circumstances, I would advise to always shoot RAW.  One example of when you may prefer to shoot JPEG is when you switch the camera's Drive Mode to Continuous Shooting.  Your camera can capture more JPEG files in Continuous Mode, than it can collect RAW files, before the continuous shooting, storage buffer fills up.


Once upon a time, back in the days of film cameras before they went digital, there were two basic types of cameras.  You had instant cameras that could shoot instant pictures, and print a hard copy of the photo on the spot.  You had more advanced cameras that used film, which would create a film negative that was used to create prints of the photos.

 

Using your DSLR to shoot JPEG files is almost equivalent to the instant cameras of old.  Using your DSLR to shoot RAW files is almost equivalent to using film and creating a negative.  Shooting as RAW files, and creating a digital negative, allows you much more latitude in correcting and compensating the final image, which is saved as a JPEG.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."