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Canon EOS 90D freezes 5 seconds after startup

tedlin01
Apprentice

Hello. I broke my LCD-screen and decided to order a new one and replace it myself since I consider myself a bit handy and have replaced screens and batteries on smartphones previously. So, I setup a desktop with all necessary tools and disassembled the camera and replaced the screen. Problem is, the camera wont turn on if the screen is connected.. and when I disconnect the screen and start the camera without the LCD it works fine for about 5 seconds and then it just freezes up.. I had this issue for a couple of months and I have pretty much disassembled every piece of the camera in my search for the issue. I have tried to disconnect all components and try them one by one and tested all cables with a multimeter and they all work fine.. I'm kind of stuck here and I am afraid to send it away to service because it may get very expensive.. Any ideas on why the camera would freeze or why the new LCD wont allow the camera to turn on?

4 REPLIES 4

jrhoffman75
Legend

Is it possible the new LCD is defective?

Sending it to Canon might be expensive, but probably less expensive than having a non-functioning camera.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

kvbarkley
VIP

I doubt that Canon will touch it, since they can't guarantee it. Are you sure you got the OEM LCD screen?

rs-eos
Whiz

There could be a secondary problem with the camera itself (attached screen perhaps causes some short or other issue).

--
Ricky

EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L, 600EX-RT (x6), ST-E3-RT
EOS C70, RF 24-70 f/2.8L IS, EF-EOS R 0.71x

Tronhard
Authority

My first impression is that you have rather cooked your goose by trying to fix it yourself.  I would think that Canon are extremely unlikely to touch it, given you have disassembled it - generally they take a very dim view of amateur camera technicians.  Given the 90D is not a lightweight object (especially if you have a lens attached, it is quite possible that the impact or torque damaged other parts of the circuitry.  Before you attempted to do the repairs, were you able to start the camera up and use it via the viewfinder?   If you had investigated that it had worked then it would be less likely to be associated with the original impact. 
I think you are about to learn a fairly expensive lesson... 🙄

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me
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