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Canon 4000D Lens Options?

kriff7
Apprentice

Hello to all!

I just got my first DSLR camera as a gift for Christmas this year.. very exciting. I was gifted a Canon EOS 4000D with the 18-55mm lens that comes included. Off the bat, I am not a fan of the lens. I am aware of the crop factor and that the 4000D isn't a "high end" camera body, which is all good as I am a beginner. 

I am interested in dipping my feet into wildlife photography and landscapes. Definitely showing more interest in wildlife. I was looking into the EF 24-105mm f/4 is usm mk1. I'm unsure though if this lens is the right option. 

I am for sure not looking to spend thousands of dollars, but would really like to invest in a good versatile lens as I am unsure what my niche is.

Thank you!

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

In the following opinions, I have and use all of the lenses I recommend, except for the Tamron, but it has an equally good reputation compared to the Sigma. I have provided images and links to offer some extra information.

Given you have advised a budget of $700-800, you might be able to get a used Tamron, or Sigma 150-600 Contemporary lens on the second-hand market as some folks relinquish their EF glass in favour of RF lenses for the Canon R-series Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera Systems (MILCS). Either of these is a great optic, but will leave you with a 100mm gap in your focal range between that and the 18-55.

Alternatively, another unit to consider is the Canon EF 70-300 IS USM f/4.5-5.6.  As you apparently understand the principle of crop factor, this will render a Field of View (FoV) equivalent to 112-480mm on a Full-Frame camera.   The MkII version is an excellent optic: fast focus, good image stabilization and not too heavy for your 4000D camera body.   

There is one available from the Canon Refurbished site, where lenses have been serviced to essentially new condition, and come with a 3-month warranty.  Here is a link to one for sale on that site, and it is well within budget.  I have produced a review of 70-300mm Canon lenses and if you are helpful, you will find it Here .

If such a lens was acceptable, then you would have some budget left to replace the 18-55 that you are not keen on, in which case the EF-S 18-135 IS STM or IS USM would be great options, and they are reasonably cheap.  They have a much wider focal range and are a better optic all round than the 18-55 you likely have.Canon 80D, EF-S 18-135mm@135mm, f/8, 1/2000sec, ISO-200, hand-heldCanon 80D, EF-S 18-135mm@135mm, f/8, 1/2000sec, ISO-200, hand-held

If you are prepared to wait a while and find a few more dollars, another excellent lens is the Canon EF-S 15-85mm, which would combine nicely with the 70-300. The extra 3mm on the wide angle end makes a considerable difference when shooting indoors, for example.  It is an excellent optic, and has been called the secret L-lens for it's quality of images. 
EF-S 15-85@15mm, f/7.1, 1/30sec, ISO-200, hand-heldEF-S 15-85@15mm, f/7.1, 1/30sec, ISO-200, hand-held

In the sample image above, the street is on an incline.

I hope you will find this information of some value and encourage you to ask further questions as you need to.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

View solution in original post

13 REPLIES 13

rs-eos
Elite

The EF 24-105mm would be a good choice.  Nice that it has a constant aperture.  Though you'll lose a bit at the wide end (24mm vs 18mm which on your crop sensor body gives the equivalent field-of-view as 38mm and  29mm respectively).

To keep the 18mm and give you more reach, you could go for the EF-S 18-135mm.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Greetings,

Wildlife photography typically requires a lens with a decent amount of "reach".  Without it, you cannot get close enough to your subjects without spooking them.  A 24~105 isn't going to get you there either.  Maybe some snap shots, but little else (realistically).  You said you didn't want to spend thousands of dollars. 

What is your budget?

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10, 430EX III-RT ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8
~CarePaks Are Worth It

Hello, Thank you for your reply!

My budget is anywhere up to around $700 to $800. 

I would like to find a versatile lens option, if any, that could possible have that reach but also sharpness with closer objects / landscapes. I am just starting out so I am unsure what exactly my style is yet.

Thank you!

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

The best lens option for wildlife, in your case, is one of the 150-600mm super zooms. You have a lens that handles the "general" stuff so you need to add a lens that has the ability to reach out and touch wildlife. BTW, the ef 24-105mm is not that lens. For one thing you are buying the same FL, 24mm to 55mm that you already have, over again. Don't do that. 

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Hello, thank you for your help!

 Would a 70-200mm f/2.8 L be a viable option?

That would be a very versatile lens.  Though it wouldn't be wide at all, so not necessarily good for landscapes (assuming you want wide angle for that).  Also not too much reach as the other lenses pointed out for wildlife.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers

Excellent lens, but well outside your stated budget. The 70-300 USM discussed above would be a better choice if you want that focal length category. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend

As an additional lens for general use I would recommend you add the 55-250 STM zoom. For true wildlife the 150-600 from either Sigma or Tamron is the best addition.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

In the following opinions, I have and use all of the lenses I recommend, except for the Tamron, but it has an equally good reputation compared to the Sigma. I have provided images and links to offer some extra information.

Given you have advised a budget of $700-800, you might be able to get a used Tamron, or Sigma 150-600 Contemporary lens on the second-hand market as some folks relinquish their EF glass in favour of RF lenses for the Canon R-series Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera Systems (MILCS). Either of these is a great optic, but will leave you with a 100mm gap in your focal range between that and the 18-55.

Alternatively, another unit to consider is the Canon EF 70-300 IS USM f/4.5-5.6.  As you apparently understand the principle of crop factor, this will render a Field of View (FoV) equivalent to 112-480mm on a Full-Frame camera.   The MkII version is an excellent optic: fast focus, good image stabilization and not too heavy for your 4000D camera body.   

There is one available from the Canon Refurbished site, where lenses have been serviced to essentially new condition, and come with a 3-month warranty.  Here is a link to one for sale on that site, and it is well within budget.  I have produced a review of 70-300mm Canon lenses and if you are helpful, you will find it Here .

If such a lens was acceptable, then you would have some budget left to replace the 18-55 that you are not keen on, in which case the EF-S 18-135 IS STM or IS USM would be great options, and they are reasonably cheap.  They have a much wider focal range and are a better optic all round than the 18-55 you likely have.Canon 80D, EF-S 18-135mm@135mm, f/8, 1/2000sec, ISO-200, hand-heldCanon 80D, EF-S 18-135mm@135mm, f/8, 1/2000sec, ISO-200, hand-held

If you are prepared to wait a while and find a few more dollars, another excellent lens is the Canon EF-S 15-85mm, which would combine nicely with the 70-300. The extra 3mm on the wide angle end makes a considerable difference when shooting indoors, for example.  It is an excellent optic, and has been called the secret L-lens for it's quality of images. 
EF-S 15-85@15mm, f/7.1, 1/30sec, ISO-200, hand-heldEF-S 15-85@15mm, f/7.1, 1/30sec, ISO-200, hand-held

In the sample image above, the street is on an incline.

I hope you will find this information of some value and encourage you to ask further questions as you need to.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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