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7D Mark ii

LesWurse
Frequent Contributor

I have a 7D Mark ii on the way (with some sort of manual) and am wondering if there is a good "how to" source for learning how to print out 10 fps shots on my Windows PC laserjet printer.

Thanks in advance,

leswurse

3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

"Explore the "proof sheet" features of some post editing software."

 

The proof sheet feature will do what you want.  It is the same exact thing as a contact sheet.  Lightroom can do this easily.  Just a few mouse clicks and it is done for you.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

View solution in original post

LesWurse
Frequent Contributor

Yes - I just finished reading an article about burst rate vs fps and "throughput" speeds. Sounds like I'll have to invest in some serious heavy duty memory cards.

Thank you all for your help!

leswurse

View solution in original post

PajamaGuy
Frequent Contributor

I have a 7D2 - unless the football play ends within 2 seconds, your buffer will stall if you're shooting RAW.  Plus, at roughly 25MB per frame, you'll fill your cards pretty fast.  Use JPG. 

 

Most venues (football, baseball, soccer, etc) I shoot 700-1,500 frames - most at 10fps. Most bursts are less than 10 frames.

 

For the single shots or 3-5 frame clips that you know you want to really sweat over, shoot both RAW and JPG.  Do some experimentation for yourself - shoot both.  Then in post, process both and see if the time spent, disk space taken, and buffer limits reached justify - for you - shooting RAW over JPG.

 

If you're doing portraits or landscapes, or just about anything but action, use RAW if you're into post processing.

 

Get & READ - 7D-Mark-II-AF-Guide.

 

Read and study the Cases.  Mr Biggs is correct - if you're steady enough and you can use the single center focus point, do so.  If not, use the expanded center (4-8 surrounding the center). The zones are OK, but you'll get focus on the wrong subjects enough to make you frustrated - especially if you are zoomed in.

 

Above all - read these boards and ask questions.

 

 

PJ
(Grampy)



"Photography is a money-sucking black hole, and I'm approaching the event horizon"

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12 REPLIES 12

TTMartin
Respected Contributor

@LesWurse wrote:

I have a 7D Mark ii on the way (with some sort of manual) and am wondering if there is a good "how to" source for learning how to print out 10 fps shots on my Windows PC laserjet printer.

 


Well, generally laserjet printers are not the best choice for photos. And good photo printers are expensive, and places like Walmart and Costco prints are cheap using top of the line laser photo printers (the lasers expose photo film). So my advice would be to use your home printer for proofs, and get your final prints done at a big box. 

LesWurse
Frequent Contributor

Thanks - good info.  I have a couple small town local newspapers and some highschool sport coaches interested in my 10 fps shots. The newspapers want copy and the coaches want to critique/improve team and individual performances.

 

So what I need to learn pretty quickly is how to print out say, a football play from start to finish.  My clients (so to speak) could pick and choose frames of their liking.  Maybe Canon's DLC will have some help. BTW, I'm retired so this is not a commercial activity,  it is a hobby and community service offering.  But first I have to learn how to do it!

leswurse

Explore the "proof sheet" features of some post editing software.  It prints multiple images on a single sheet of paper.  You could and easily print a sequence.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

ebiggs1
Forum Elite

"...  a good "how to" source for learning how to print out 10 fps shots on my Windows PC laserjet printer."

 

What do you mean "10 fps"?  You don't print at 10 fps.

But any way the Pro-100 photo printer from Canon will print photos as well as any big box store.  Plus they are a real good buy cost wise.  Usually a large rebate is offered.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

LesWurse
Frequent Contributor

I used poor language being a newbie at this. I meant - when I have some 10 fps shots on my card(s), I need to learn how to print them out say on one or two sheets of paper.  In the old days of film cameras we used to call them "contact sheets", so people could pick and choose the final ones for finished printing.

 

Thanks for your clarifying question.

leswurse

cicopo
Esteemed Contributor

It sounds like you may need to have a very fast memory card for your intended use & I'd recommend just shooting jpg's so you don't run up against the buffer. It fast but a full play at 10 FPS will be a lot of files that need writing. 

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

LesWurse
Frequent Contributor

Yes - I just finished reading an article about burst rate vs fps and "throughput" speeds. Sounds like I'll have to invest in some serious heavy duty memory cards.

Thank you all for your help!

leswurse

PajamaGuy
Frequent Contributor

I have a 7D2 - unless the football play ends within 2 seconds, your buffer will stall if you're shooting RAW.  Plus, at roughly 25MB per frame, you'll fill your cards pretty fast.  Use JPG. 

 

Most venues (football, baseball, soccer, etc) I shoot 700-1,500 frames - most at 10fps. Most bursts are less than 10 frames.

 

For the single shots or 3-5 frame clips that you know you want to really sweat over, shoot both RAW and JPG.  Do some experimentation for yourself - shoot both.  Then in post, process both and see if the time spent, disk space taken, and buffer limits reached justify - for you - shooting RAW over JPG.

 

If you're doing portraits or landscapes, or just about anything but action, use RAW if you're into post processing.

 

Get & READ - 7D-Mark-II-AF-Guide.

 

Read and study the Cases.  Mr Biggs is correct - if you're steady enough and you can use the single center focus point, do so.  If not, use the expanded center (4-8 surrounding the center). The zones are OK, but you'll get focus on the wrong subjects enough to make you frustrated - especially if you are zoomed in.

 

Above all - read these boards and ask questions.

 

 

PJ
(Grampy)



"Photography is a money-sucking black hole, and I'm approaching the event horizon"

LesWurse
Frequent Contributor

Thanks - these are the techniques I'm after. I'll  print this out and refer to it often.

 

Regards,

leswurse