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Your thoughts on the EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 L IS USM lens

March411
Rising Star

Does anyone have experience with this lens, owned or used one. I want a full frame in this zoom range and love the of versatility of the lens. I own one in this range but it is APS-C so I'm unable to use it on my 5d M4 and when I go MILC I would like it to crossover if possible. Anyone's experience with this on a MILC would be great.

 

 



Be a different person on the web, be kind, respectful and most of all be helpful!

90D ~ 5D Mark IV ~ R6 Mark II ~ R50 and way to many lenses
Photoshop and Topaz Suite for post processing
http://commonhangout.com/piwigo/
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

I got my EF 28-300L IS USM back in about 2011.  It was second-hand but in good condition.  The lens is the one of the super zooms that Canon brought out for their L series, if I recall correctly there was there was a 35-300 and one other.  It is built like a proverbial tank, all-metal, heavy and with great optics, especially considering the range across which it was designed to perform.  I am not a huge fan of push-pull lenses, but that was how that generation of lenses was designed: I had another lens from that era, the EF 100-400L IS USM that was also good for its time, but again push-pull.
I found the resolution to be excellent on my copy, and it focused very quickly, with good IS.  It had a beautiful colour tonal quality about the images, one that I found only on a select few of the L-series lenses.   It was with regret that I sold it last year to help fund my move across to RF optics, but I was downsizing my menagerie of DSLR bodies and lenses as I just had too many and having had a heart attack, I was suddenly aware of how much challenge a huge amount of legacy gear would put upon my family (who are not into photography) to deal with when I go.  So, it sold.
I can only relate my own experience, but it was very, very positive.

The following image may indicated what I mean about the tonal quality.  This was taken on an early morning walk, with the 400D (Rebel Xti), hand-held, available light.   It is a memorial very close to where I lived on Vancouver Island to celebrate the life of a very brave young man, Terry Fox: Learn about Terry Fox.  His life is commemorated in many statues and annual marathons across the county. Canon EOS 400D, EF 28-300L@97mm, f/8, 1/500sec, ISO-800Canon EOS 400D, EF 28-300L@97mm, f/8, 1/500sec, ISO-800

I hope this is of some assistance.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

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12 REPLIES 12

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

I got my EF 28-300L IS USM back in about 2011.  It was second-hand but in good condition.  The lens is the one of the super zooms that Canon brought out for their L series, if I recall correctly there was there was a 35-300 and one other.  It is built like a proverbial tank, all-metal, heavy and with great optics, especially considering the range across which it was designed to perform.  I am not a huge fan of push-pull lenses, but that was how that generation of lenses was designed: I had another lens from that era, the EF 100-400L IS USM that was also good for its time, but again push-pull.
I found the resolution to be excellent on my copy, and it focused very quickly, with good IS.  It had a beautiful colour tonal quality about the images, one that I found only on a select few of the L-series lenses.   It was with regret that I sold it last year to help fund my move across to RF optics, but I was downsizing my menagerie of DSLR bodies and lenses as I just had too many and having had a heart attack, I was suddenly aware of how much challenge a huge amount of legacy gear would put upon my family (who are not into photography) to deal with when I go.  So, it sold.
I can only relate my own experience, but it was very, very positive.

The following image may indicated what I mean about the tonal quality.  This was taken on an early morning walk, with the 400D (Rebel Xti), hand-held, available light.   It is a memorial very close to where I lived on Vancouver Island to celebrate the life of a very brave young man, Terry Fox: Learn about Terry Fox.  His life is commemorated in many statues and annual marathons across the county. Canon EOS 400D, EF 28-300L@97mm, f/8, 1/500sec, ISO-800Canon EOS 400D, EF 28-300L@97mm, f/8, 1/500sec, ISO-800

I hope this is of some assistance.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

March411
Rising Star

Trevor, sorry to hear about your heart attack and that it made you evaluate a part of your life that you hold with so much passion. Having to look at your possessions for the reason you mentioned is pretty impactful. Makes another person think about their own existence. I truly hope you are doing well.   

Thank you for the great information, it is indeed very helpful.The weight and the push/pull were thee two things that give me pause but I love the range of this lens. I own the Sigma and bought a second for my daughter who hasn't taken it off the body since she received it.

You have just pushed me closer to the lens and for what it's worth the the R5 or R6 Mark II. I'm just having a tough time deciding which one will be a better fit.

Most appreciated!



Be a different person on the web, be kind, respectful and most of all be helpful!

90D ~ 5D Mark IV ~ R6 Mark II ~ R50 and way to many lenses
Photoshop and Topaz Suite for post processing
http://commonhangout.com/piwigo/

Thank you for your kind words.  We all have to go some time, so I'm trying to make the most of each day.

Now, if you are considering an R-series camera, just to confuse your choice :-), I was amazed at the RF 24-240 IS USM lens.  I had originally ordered the 24-105 f/4 and then it went on back-order for about 6 months. Keen to get something to work with, I ordered as a stopgap: the 24-240, which is Canon's first journey into the super zoom range since those heavy L lenses. 

I was frankly amazed at the level of performance and even after getting my original 24-105, I use this optic far more.  Lens design has come a long way since those venerable, excellent but heavy and expensive optics. I had looked at several reviews from people I trust and had borrowed a lens and was really impressed.  When I got the RF 24-105L I tried it in a series of comparison shots and found no noticeable difference in the optical quality - obviously the 24-240 does not keep a constant aperture, but neither did the EF 28-300L.  I liked that it was very light, because of its modern composite materials, but it still felt solid to me.  It balances really well on the R5 and R6 model bodies that I have, which is nice, whereas the EF 28-300L was definitely nose heavy and more so as it seriously extended to zoom. The performance of this lens was instrumental in my decision to relinquish the EF 28-300L.
The 24-240 is one of the first of several Canon RF lenses to use computational photography to improve its wide-angle performance.  As I had it explained to me, the lens actually shoots at around 21mm, but uses the 3mm difference with in-camera correction (or for PS or LR auto import lens correction) to correct distortions and vignetting to produce excellent images at the widest angle.  This feature is not limited to non-L lenses: my RF 14-35L f/4 lens uses the same technology - I think this had to happen as camera makers finally started to use some of the processes that have long been in use for cell phones.
Here are some examples taken at the rather dimly lit Auckland museum.  Sadly, I forgot that on one of my R6 bodies I had auto ISO on, so some of the exposure values for ISO and SS are somewhat different.

RF 24-105L@105mm , f/8, 1/40sec, ISO-1600RF 24-105L@105mm , f/8, 1/40sec, ISO-1600RF 24-240@109mm, f/6.3, 1/10sec, ISO-250RF 24-240@109mm, f/6.3, 1/10sec, ISO-250RF 24-240@50mm, f/6.3, 1/2sec, ISO-250RF 24-240@50mm, f/6.3, 1/2sec, ISO-250RF 24-105@50mm, f/6.3, 1/15sec, ISO-1600RF 24-105@50mm, f/6.3, 1/15sec, ISO-1600RF 24-240@24mm, f/6.3, 1/4sec, ISO-250RF 24-240@24mm, f/6.3, 1/4sec, ISO-250Rf24-105@26mm, f/6.3, 1/15sec, ISO-1600Rf24-105@26mm, f/6.3, 1/15sec, ISO-1600RF 24-240@24mm, f/6.3, 1/80sec, ISO-250RF 24-240@24mm, f/6.3, 1/80sec, ISO-250  24-105 @ 24mm, f/6.3, 1/60sec, ISO-50024-105 @ 24mm, f/6.3, 1/60sec, ISO-500

Absolutely, it's not an L lens, so it does not come with significant weather sealing, or a lens hood (3rd party ones are very cheap) but the range is great and the IS and focusing work brilliantly with the advanced features of R5 and R6 bodies.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

March411
Rising Star

Some beautiful shots and really no discernible difference even as I looked at the larger images.

Ironic that you would mention this lens because right now I have the RF85mm F2 Macro IS STM, RF24-240mm F4 IS USM and the R6 Mark II in my cart (and a control ring). The RF24-240mm is about half the weight of the EF 28-300 and from the photo's you posted produces some beautiful images.

I'm struggling with the choice of a MILC body which is why I asked about the EF 28-300, it will match nicely with the 5D until I end my confusion on mirror-less. I'm not much into portrait work so I am leaning towards the R6 but the R5 is tough to resist.

If you don't mind me asking, do you live in New Zealand?

 



Be a different person on the web, be kind, respectful and most of all be helpful!

90D ~ 5D Mark IV ~ R6 Mark II ~ R50 and way to many lenses
Photoshop and Topaz Suite for post processing
http://commonhangout.com/piwigo/

Yes, I do now.  I have four nationalities, so have lived around the globe.
Well, I can understand your dilemma... I still retain the following bodies: D60, 400D (Xti), 5DsR and an 80D from my DSLR collection, along with the EF 17-40, EF 24-105L,  70-200L MkII f/4, 70-300L and 100-400L MkII, plus that awesome Sigma 60-600s - all of which function OK with my MILC bodies.

The each of the two MILC bodies offer different benefits.  The R5 @ 45mp allows me to crop, and even get decent images at 17MP on 1.6 crop, while the R6 variants offer about 1EV extra dynamic range and ISO performance.
I think a lot comes down to what you shoot and what you produce and that's a personal thing...


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

March411
Rising Star

I'm jealous, you are very lucky!

And thank you for not correcting me, I'm told you really live on, not in New Zealand. I have a friend from there and he corrects me all the time. He tells me that you live on an island. I explain to him we are all surrounded by water so technically.....

I can't repeat his response.



Be a different person on the web, be kind, respectful and most of all be helpful!

90D ~ 5D Mark IV ~ R6 Mark II ~ R50 and way to many lenses
Photoshop and Topaz Suite for post processing
http://commonhangout.com/piwigo/

Well, then he would have corrected me because NZ is made up of over 600 Islands, but is generally recognized for its three main islands.  Thus NZ, as far as I am concerned, is a country, not just an island so I live within the archipelago, if one wants to get pedantic!


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

March411
Rising Star

I hope you don't mind if I use that next time he gives me grief.



Be a different person on the web, be kind, respectful and most of all be helpful!

90D ~ 5D Mark IV ~ R6 Mark II ~ R50 and way to many lenses
Photoshop and Topaz Suite for post processing
http://commonhangout.com/piwigo/

Be my guest!  I guess I could say I live on the North Island, aka Te Ika a Maui (the Fish of Maui) in NZ Māori culture.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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