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T5i - Need Lens recommendation for Sports - upgrade help!

camar0rs
Contributor

I currently have a Canon EOS Rebel T5i from some time back as base camera

Also have the 75-300mm lens

It was budge purchase some time back so I am not opposed to upgrading camera either...

Just not getting pictures I would like super clear etc.   I mainly shoot volleyball and baseball

Should i be looking at getting the " EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS III USM " ?

Any problems with this lens and current camera?

I potentially could get a good deal in the future for a Canon EOS R5 (4147C002), I would think this is a big upgrade in camera?

9 REPLIES 9

deebatman316
Elite
Elite

What is your budget to spend on a new camera and lens. The EF 75-300mm lens lineup all have terrible optics and use very old and slow AF motors. The EF 70-200mm F/2.8L IS USM lens lineup is a huge upgrade over the EF 75-300mm lens lineup. How far will you be away from the action. Since pictures aren't clear can you post a picture for us. It sounds like your settings aren't right. What mode are you shooting in on the top mode dial.


-Demetrius

Current Gear: EOS 5D Mark IV, EF F/2.8 Trinity, EF 50mm F/1.8 STM, EF 85mm F/1.8 USM, 470EX-AI & 600EX II-RT

Retired Gear: EOS 40D

right now my budget is open for the most part... i know the lens is like $2,000 so all reviews i have seen appear to be good..  for the sports I can be anywhere from 10ft to 200ft away 

Im pretty sure my settings also are bad for taking pictures and i do not have a current example to show.  What settings should I be doing for sports?

As for the lens, I guess i would have to go with the EF one to use on this camera model right?  as the RF one i saw is a different tech?   

I just want to make sure the lens I get can be used on a newer camera when i finally upgrade that, prob within couple months

stevet1
Whiz
Whiz

camar0rs,

You say you like to photograph baseball and volleyball. Both of these sports involve a lot of movement, so if you want to freeze that movement, you are going to need fast shutter speeds - I would say anywhere between 1/400 to 1/2000 depending on how much action is taking place at any one moment.

The thing is, when you increase your shutter speed, you are limiting, or shortening the amount of time that your camera sensor is exposed to light. so, you have to compensate for that by either widening your aperture, or increasing your ISO.

I think what I would do, is put my camera in Tv (or shutter priority) mode and use Auto ISO. Pick a shutter speed around 600-800 and let the camera set ypur aperture and ISO. Take a few test shots and see if you are happy with the results. You can decide if you want to go a little faster or a little slower to keep things sharp.

I have never used a 75-300 lens, but, from what I've read, it doesn't have a very good reputation. The 70-200 has a better reputation and being able to drop down to an f/2.8 aperture will be a plus in your situation.

If you do decide to upgrade to an R series camera, like the R5, you can use your EF mount lenses, if you get an EF-R adapter. Those run around $130.

You cannot, however, use RF lenses on an EF mount camera, like your T5i

The lens you were talking about runs about $1,900 new, or $1,000 used.

The R10 camera with an RF18-150mm lens kit runs about $1,400.

The R7 with an RF18-150mm lens runs around $1,800.

Steve Thomas.

 

 

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Greetings,

Steve and Demetrius have provided good feedback and excellent advice.  I'd just like to add one thing.  I would not make a hasty upgrade decision when you are looking at one or more upgrades (body and lens) in the very near future. 

The 9point AF of the T5i is not the best for action photography.  Can it work, absolutely.  Putting a faster lens on the front of it will also help

While the EF 70-200 f2.8 will work on the camera you have now and any R series adapted, It might be best to hold off and buy the RF version if a new body is only one or two months away.  This is taking into consideration warranty and longevity of the overall investment.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.7.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10, 430EX III-RT ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8
~CarePaks Are Worth It

yea this is what I am struggling with, i really wanted to take some good pictures for tournaments in the next 6 weeks but all i have is the T5i currently ...  I could get the EF 70-200 to work on this camera and adapt it to an RF body later buttttttttt should i just go to directly to RF for both and be done with it... ugh... the decisions...  

wq9nsc
Authority
Authority

The EF 70-200 f2.8 is an excellent sports lens and is my most frequently used lens for sports (I shoot football, soccer, baseball, basketball, etc.)  At a typical event, I use a pair of 1DX III bodies with a 70-200 f2.8 on one and generally a 400 f2.8 or 200-400 f4 "integrated extender" lens on the other body depending upon the sport and lighting conditions.

Probably 90% of the time I have the aperture wide open, for a bright daylight event I will drop down as far as f4.  Except where you are doing group celebration shots, classic sports images are shot wide open for minimal depth of field so that the player(s) of interest "pop" from the background.

I shoot in manual mode, typical wide open with shutter speed set based upon sport and conditions.  I don't like dropping below 1/800 which is still fast enough to fully freeze motion for football, soccer, etc. while allowing reasonable light under unreasonable lighting conditions.  I will go up to 1/2000 for very bright light but that is infrequent.  I keep ISO set for auto and let it adjust for changing light conditions because in outdoor daylight games, the light level will be constantly changing and only a tiny percent of sports venues are evenly illuminated with artificial light.

Always shoot in RAW, it provides more degrees of freedom in post when things don't go perfectly in capture.

I set AF to either single point or single with four point expansion depending upon the sport.  You can drool over spec sheets for AF points (my 1DX III bodies have 191 point AF arrays but for sports I will be using 1 or sometimes up to 5 points and close to center) and eye tracking AF which is of limited use and often a detriment in shooting fast action sports.  For sports, if you want great images you are still going to be doing a lot of the thinking and work regardless of body because you have to know the sport and anticipate the action.  You will have to put the focus point on the proper player which often changes multiple times between different players in a few seconds. 

My biggest concern with gear is high performance and solid reliability which is why I continue to be fully satisfied with my 1DX III bodies which aren't finicky, have extremely long battery life, and are dead reliable under lousy temperature and rain conditions.  Don't fall prey to "pixel peeping" and "spec sheet drooling" because that will just be a distraction on your way to developing your expertise in shooting fast action sports.

Upgrade from your current lens now, get a better camera body when you can, and enjoy shooting and learning in the meantime.  Back in the late 1980s, I had just finished my PhD and was interviewing at universities for my first professional position and one of the universities was doing marketing work for an up and coming car race driver.  Attending an event was part of my interview weekend and I will never forget what the driver said post-race to a "newbie" driver complaining he could have done better with a better car.  The advice was, "You run what you brung son" 🙂  That is solid advice no matter what your task or profession, figure out how to get the best out of your current gear while learning the ropes and upgrade in a logical and smart fashion.

Rodger

EOS 1DX M3, 1DX M2, 1DX, 5DS R, M6 Mark II, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video

Thanks for all the insight..

Do you think the Canon EOS R5 is a good fit?  I believe this might be my best canon upgrade option as I can get a great deal on it...  I really do not want to by old tech when i am getting in the game so late.  i also realize though a lot of this tech as been around a very long time.   so i guess this choice would be for more future lasting..

My options currently i think are:

1) Get the EF 70-200 f2.8  and adapter  and use on the T5i for the time being

or

2) Get the RF 70-200 f2.8 and R5,  sell the T5i with 18-55 and 75-300 lens

So it looks like I will be able to do the upgrade here next week

What is your opinion on the R5 with RF24-105mm F4 L IS USM ?  it is kit 4147C013

based on cost, looks like the camera+lens kit is about $880 more that just the body, so is it worth it?

I still plan on getting the 70-200 lens but for an everyday lens, will the 24-105 be good for that?

My main use likely will be at sporting events as noted but still with this cost investment, i will be using it more often

I think i was reading the 100-400 lens is another consideration for sporting and wildlife?  

keep in mind i think i probably will only be a max of 220ft away from subject at baseball, volleyball is way shorter

 

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

"Just not getting pictures I would like super clear etc."

Your lens is probably reason number one why. The Rebel T5i is a capable camera given good optics. Of course if you have the means a newer model is a good thing to do. However even a new camera and a great lens is no guarantee you will get great photos. A lot of the responders here always seem to think new gear is mandatory and the answer.

In sports the main most important thing is not your gear but where you shoot from. Secondly knowing the sport because if you don't know what happening or going to happen the best gear in the world will do you no good. These two things are free to do. Next post editing is mandatory and Canon offers you a very good on also it is free. You can d/l DPP4 from the web site.

An R5 and the rf 70-200mm f2.8l would be a killer combo for volleyball but not so good for baseball depending on number 1 above, where you shoot from. I would prefer something like one of the 150-600mm super zooms for baseball and/or football.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!
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