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Switching to Canon.. EF or RF lenses?

kyojim
Apprentice

I've been looking for a new camera for a while, switching over to Canon full frame from Panasonic M4/3 (I shoot mostly video, but like the capability of high quality stills if I need to).

I thought I was set on a 1DX Mark ii until Canon released the EOS R, and more specifically the new RF lenses. I currently don't own a single piece of Canon glass. The EOS R doesn't have all of the features that I'd like, and the 1DX seems like the better camera for me (minus the massive size).

My question is this: does it make more sense to invest in RF lenses, hoping that sometime Canon releases an RF camera with features that are better for me, and when they do I'll already have built up a nice RF lens collection? Or should I stick with the 1DX and start from scratch now with EF lenses?

7 REPLIES 7

jrhoffman75
Legend

You should look at the EOS R3.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

rs-eos
Whiz

As you are looking to start out with Canon, I would strongly recommend starting with RF glass.  It's the future.

For mostly video work, do look at the new EOS R5 C.   Though I can recommend the dedicated video unit EOS C70.

As John mentioned, also do look at the EOS R3.

--
Ricky

EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L, 600EX-RT (x6), ST-E3-RT
EOS C70, RF 24-70 f/2.8L IS, EF-EOS R 0.71x

ebiggs1
Legend

This is the correct answer, "You should look at the EOS R3."

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Tronhard
Authority

Obviously, a lot depends upon your budget, of which we have no knowledge.  If you favour the 1DX series then I agree with the advice you have been given that the R3 is the closest to that system, and that RF glass is the way to go, especially if you have no investment in legacy EF lenses.


cheers, TREVOR

Professional photographer, engineer and educator since 1980

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me


@Tronhard wrote:

Obviously, a lot depends upon your budget, of which we have no knowledge.  If you favour the 1DX series then I agree with the advice you have been given that the R3 is the closest to that system, and that RF glass is the way to go, especially if you have no investment in legacy EF lenses.


I re-read the OP's original post. If he/she was looking for a 1D X then I stand by my original recommendation to look at the R3. But, seeing that his/her primary interest seems to be video then I believe Trevor's recommendation for a video camera with still capture capability is a better recommendation. DSLRs and EOS R versions other than the R5C are still cameras with video capability. I can't speak to the R5C.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

I don't remember the comment about video when I first read the original post, but the R3 is still a good solution if a hybrid solution is desired.  However, if the intent is to lean heavily towards the R5c - really, it's a balance only the OP can decide...


cheers, TREVOR

Professional photographer, engineer and educator since 1980

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

AtticusLake
Enthusiast

The simple answer is: RF. Mirrorless is the future, and this is true across the industry. Sony have E-mount, replacing the old Minolta/A mount; Nikon are dumping F for their mirrorless Z mount; the Four Thirds system is a distant memory, having been replaced by Micro Four Thirds; etc.

The problem is that RF is relatively new: there are quite a few RF lenses available, but they tend to be expensive. Third-party lenses are manual focus only; there are no Sigma lenses for RF. Give it a few years and I think it's pretty clear that all this will change; Canon have made it clear that RF is the future, so anyone (Sigma e.g.) who want to play in the Canon market, needs to get with RF.

In terms of cameras, I think definitely RF. An RF camera can take both RF and EF lenses, with an appropriate adapter, so it's the way to go. It would also be adaptable to PL mount, Nikon F, etc.

As for which camera, you say you "like the capability of high quality stills if I need to". Honestly, I think you're spoilt for choice there; I don't know of any decent modern mirrorless camera that doesn't take really good stills. I you want really high-end, then the R3, of course, but really, I think most RF cameras will fit most peoples's stills needs. If there's a specific feature you want, like maybe intervalometer, then obviously check whether the camera you're looking at has it; but otherwise, you can't go far wrong.

But you also say "I shoot mostly video". I don't know if you're looking at fairly casual video -- in which case, again, spoilt for choice -- or if you want to go very HQ. But if the latter, then I think the R5 and R5C are both worth a look. The R5 (I have one) is a fantastic video camera; it shoots 10-bit, log, and has true 4k pixel resolution. ("4K" cameras have 4k photosites, not pixels, and use interpolation to get to 4k resolution. The R5 has 8k photosites, so delivers a genuine 4k pixels. The difference is clearly visible.)

I've been using the R5 for 9 months, and I've been shooting half-hour landscape segments with it, in 4k HQ mode, with no problems. However, half an hour is the limit for any clip on the R5, and if you keep hitting record when it stops, you may run into overheating issues. The R5C fixes both these problems, so it's certainly an option, though it is bigger, due to active cooling. I also have a C70, which is a whole other league of cinema camera, but it's superb, though its stills capability is basic.

The main thing I would say is figure out what you want, and price out the ENTIRE SYSTEM -- camera, batteries, adapters, lenses, memory cards. Then choose what best fits your needs.

Do bear in mind that while EF lenses can be adapted to RF cameras, RF lenses can NOT be adapted to EF cameras. (You might be able to use a diopter adapter, but all the reviews I've seen say those are junk, so don't go there.)

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