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Recommended settings for panoramic photos?

limvo05
Rising Star

Hello Experts,

 

I was wondering if there's such a thing as recommended settings for panoramic photos? By settings I am referring to focal distance, focal length, Tripod, L Bracket, Manual focus, manual settings, etc.?

 

Lastly, what would be the ideal number of photos needed for an optimal panoramic photo? 3, 5, 7, 9? How much overlapping would you be taking?

 

Thank you,

LV

15 REPLIES 15

"But the final panorama is a JPEG file, isn't it? Which limits the range of editing that you can do, doesn't it?"

 

It is better to have all the images similar to start with.  One other thing is to try and keep the horizon level beside to other tips I suggested.  In my humble experience anyways.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

All,

 

What do you think of this? The one thing I don't like about this photo is that, I used a 3 stop Soft ND Grad and placed the filter line a bit too high aboe the horizon, as a result, the upper portion of ther sky is a bit darker than the lower section. This is mostly because it was rather difficult to judge when looking through live view and bright daylight. Perhaps, the next time, I put a towel over my head to block direct sunlight from messing up with the LCD display?


Thanks,

LV

 


@limvo05 wrote:

All,

 

What do you think of this? The one thing I don't like about this photo is that, I used a 3 stop Soft ND Grad and placed the filter line a bit too high aboe the horizon, as a result, the upper portion of ther sky is a bit darker than the lower section. This is mostly because it was rather difficult to judge when looking through live view and bright daylight. Perhaps, the next time, I put a towel over my head to block direct sunlight from messing up with the LCD display?


Thanks,

LV

 


Your image does not appear.  Remember there is a 5MB. Maximum File size limit.

I do to recommend using a graduated filter to make a panorama shot.  

 

What I have done is take a series of HDR shots, and then stitch those together into panoramic shot.  This actually produced more noise than simply stitching the original 0 Ev shots, and then processing them in Lightroom with its’ digital filters.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

"I recommend you make any post-processing image adjustments ..."

 

No not really.  It is better to have all the images similar.  The closer the better. But some people try to make panos harder than to do then they are.  There is lots of software that will combine images but LR is just about the best.  Not surprising I guess.

While just about any lens can be used, one thing to remember is to turn your camera vertical and not horizontal.  It is surprising how many experienced folks forget the camera can shoot in the vertical position.

 

The one I offered of Ellis Island was seven shots with a 28mm lens and in vertical position.  They are just quick snapshots because the scene was bigger than I could show with one shot. Nut'in fancy!

 

LR has an option, Sync Settings. I always use that first. I also have a certain import preset that gets applied automatically.  DPP4 has a similar feature but I don't remember or if it has pano ability since I don't use it very often.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Mitsubishiman
Rising Star

Practice - Practice - Practice

 

 

Full Size Download =

 

 **Link Removed per Forum Guidelines***

 

 

Saylorville Gold Moon 3200.jpg


@Mitsubishiman wrote:

Practice - Practice - Practice

 

 

Full Size Download =

 

 **Link Removed per Forum Guidelines***

 

 

Saylorville Gold Moon 3200.jpg


That... and a bit of time in Photoshop faking in the moon.

 

 

You might want to learn a bit of astronomy before trying to fake a photo that includes the moon.

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
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