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Update of Camera Window DC8 software for Mac OS Mojave

CanalogSE
Enthusiast

When will this Canon software Camera Window DC8 be updated? Presently is the Mac OS 10.14 2 Mojave 64 bit installed on my Mac Book Pro,  and the next OS update from Apple (mid-year 2019?) will probably disable USB cable download from my PowerShot (G1x MK III) to my laptop. Any Canon software in sight?

 

CanalogSE

 

3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS


@CanalogSE wrote:

 

On one hand it is good that we are at least two Canon users that have this problem...on the other hand, we may have to wait until we have been assured that our requirement for an program update has reached the right descision level within the Canon corporation, and if an update is not intended we have to re-tthink what to do....

 


I would be beg to differ.  You are two Apple users with “this problem.”  In fact, every Apple user suffers from the problem of Apple’s bad habit of periodically releasing updates to their OS that break the codebase of existing applications.  In other words, Apple likes to keep moving the goal posts by altering the design rules of how their OS works.

 

Consider this analogy of how software works, and interacts with the OS.  Look at the OS as being a grocery store, and software developers are chefs.  You, the user, would be the customer in the chef’s restaurant.  The chef obtains the ingredients for his dishes from grocery store, which is the Apple OS.  The chef obtains the gas for his stoves and ovens from the Apple OS.

To obtain the items that chef needs from the Apple OS, he goes to a ticket window.  In fact, there are hundreds of ticket windows for software developers to use.  There are established rules for how the transactions work at each ticket window.  The chef fills out a ticket request, and the Apple OS returns goods and services to the chef to use in his restaurant.  

 

Of course, some chefs obtain goods on the black market, which the Apple OS considers as rouges and dangerous.  Some chefs create their own paths and back channels into the supply chain, which ultimately originates from the core of the Apple OS.  Unfortunately, the only access to the actual physical hardware of the Apple devices is through such means.  This is also true of the Microsoft Windows, too, but apparently to a much lesser degree.

 

Now, this is where the ‘fun” begins.  When Apple updates their OS, their goal is to get rid of the black market, which I hope you have surmised is my analogy for malware.  Their goal is close up the back channels into the OS, although they may choose to allow some back channels to continue to exist, or even promote it into a full service ticket window.  

 

Ultimately,  Apple’s goal is close off as many of these back channels and black markets as they can.  Chefs whose restaurants are critically dependent on these avenues of access to the OS operate at their own peril.  Frequently, the process of closing off these back channels means altering the rules of a valid ticketed service window, or even completely eliminating it.  

 

Changes of this sort are most common for the service windows that control access the hardware [like USB ports].  


--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

View solution in original post


@Waddizzle wrote:

 

 


I would be beg to differ.  You are two Apple users with “this problem.”  In fact, every Apple user suffers from the problem of Apple’s bad habit of periodically releasing updates to their OS that break the codebase of existing applications.  In other words, Apple likes to keep moving the goal posts by altering the design rules of how their OS works.

 

Consider this analogy of how software works, and interacts with the OS.  Look at the OS as being a grocery store, and software developers are chefs.  You, the user, would be the customer in the chef’s restaurant.  The chef obtains the ingredients for his dishes from grocery store, which is the Apple OS.  The chef obtains the gas for his stoves and ovens from the Apple OS.

To obtain the items that chef needs from the Apple OS, he goes to a ticket window.  In fact, there are hundreds of ticket windows for software developers to use.  There are established rules for how the transactions work at each ticket window.  The chef fills out a ticket request, and the Apple OS returns goods and services to the chef to use in his restaurant.  

 

Of course, some chefs obtain goods on the black market, which the Apple OS considers as rouges and dangerous.  Some chefs create their own paths and back channels into the supply chain, which ultimately originates from the core of the Apple OS.  Unfortunately, the only access to the actual physical hardware of the Apple devices is through such means.  This is also true of the Microsoft Windows, too, but apparently to a much lesser degree.

 

Now, this is where the ‘fun” begins.  When Apple updates their OS, their goal is to get rid of the black market, which I hope you have surmised is my analogy for malware.  Their goal is close up the back channels into the OS, although they may choose to allow some back channels to continue to exist, or even promote it into a full service ticket window.  

 

Ultimately,  Apple’s goal is close off as many of these back channels and black markets as they can.  Chefs whose restaurants are critically dependent on these avenues of access to the OS operate at their own peril.  Frequently, the process of closing off these back channels means altering the rules of a valid ticketed service window, or even completely eliminating it.  

Changes of this sort are most common for the service windows that control access the hardware [like USB ports].  




No no...! I don’t know who accepted the above as a solution, but I strongly disagree. What ”Waddizzle” writes is to me irrellevant mumbo-jumbo. If the short answer to my initial problem is that the software Canon Camera Window DC8 will not be updated to be compatible with future Mac versions of OS Mojave, then I would like to hear that from  the Canon corporation directly. Then I will decide whether I will get me a camera of another brand that allows me to cable download my images to my Mac laptop, or to take out the memory card from the camera for image transfer to my computer. However awkward, this is likely to be the case in the future. And in any case of the two, Canon earns a lot of badwill in my opinion anyway. Finaly, I do not think that we are only twp persons worldwide that would prefer downloading images by cable from their compact Canon camera.

View solution in original post

Since Canon apparently is uninterested to solve this problem or to even reply, I have found a way around the problem and use another way to be able to download images taken with my Canon PowerShot G1X Mk III to my MacBookPro through the USB Cable...

 

Through the Mac OS Mojave to the present OS Catalina, the problem with the Canon 32 bit image download software still remains.

 

The Solution is Adobe Bridge software...which has the download images function which works just fine in this respect. Great! For others who might have the same problem...try this solution! 

 

I have been a faithful customer to Canon during 50 years now...constantly since 1971 with my first SLR camera Canon FTb and I have spent a lot of hard earned money on lots of new Canon photo equipment over the years, but haven't even received any tip or sort of reply to this. Sorry to say, their total uninterest has surprised me greatly.

/B

View solution in original post

16 REPLIES 16

I am still waiting...no news yet? Not even a reply from Canon Inc. ?

Canalog SE


@CanalogSE wrote:

I am still waiting...no news yet? Not even a reply from Canon Inc. ?

Canalog SE


It is not in Apple’s best self interests for software from camera manufacturers to work.  Apple would much rather see you upgrade your camera by purchasing the latest Apple product, instead of seeing you purchase a 3rd party camera and install “free” software.

Like I said earlier, the camera manufacturer apps break because Apple breaks them.  That is how software development works on the Apple platform.  Software developers pay a fee to Apple to use their application development software.  Then they pay a fee to Apple to release the application through the Apple Store.  When Apple releases a OS update, that involves more licensing fees so that developers can code against the updated OS libraries.

 

The Microsoft software development model is compeletely different.  It is open and free for anyone to use.  Software updates are just that updates.  Microsoft does not disguise OS upgrades as a software update.  Unlike Apple, OS upgrades are not forced upon users, either.

 

Both approaches have their pros and cons for end users, software developers, and Apple or Microsoft.  

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Listen Mr. Waddizzle:

You wrote:

It is not in Apple’s best self interests for software from camera manufacturers to work.  Apple would much rather see you upgrade your camera by purchasing the latest Apple product, instead of seeing you purchase a 3rd party camera and install “free” software.

Like I said earlier, the camera manufacturer apps break because Apple breaks them.  That is how software development works on the Apple platform.  Software developers pay a fee to Apple to use their application development software.  Then they pay a fee to Apple to release the application through the Apple Store.  When Apple releases a OS update, that involves more licensing fees so that developers can code against the updated OS libraries.

 

The Microsoft software development model is compeletely different.  It is open and free for anyone to use.  Software updates are just that updates.  Microsoft does not disguise OS upgrades as a software update.  Unlike Apple, OS upgrades are not forced upon users, either.

 

Both approaches have their pros and cons for end users, software developers, and Apple or Microsoft.  

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
 
I know your position, i.e. Canon is junk, Apple is junk, Microsoft is heavenlike...
 
Since we totally disagree with each other, and you have stated your postition re. the above before, PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO MY POSTS IN THIS MATTER ANY MORE. I am not interested!
Canalog SE

 

Sometimes the truth is ugly, and something that we do not want to hear.  Solutions do not always fit into the niches that we want.  Good Luck resolving your problems.  

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Since Canon apparently is uninterested to solve this problem or to even reply, I have found a way around the problem and use another way to be able to download images taken with my Canon PowerShot G1X Mk III to my MacBookPro through the USB Cable...

 

Through the Mac OS Mojave to the present OS Catalina, the problem with the Canon 32 bit image download software still remains.

 

The Solution is Adobe Bridge software...which has the download images function which works just fine in this respect. Great! For others who might have the same problem...try this solution! 

 

I have been a faithful customer to Canon during 50 years now...constantly since 1971 with my first SLR camera Canon FTb and I have spent a lot of hard earned money on lots of new Canon photo equipment over the years, but haven't even received any tip or sort of reply to this. Sorry to say, their total uninterest has surprised me greatly.

/B

elia
Apprentice

If you just need to transfer your pictures from your Canon to your Mac (> mojave), just use Image Capture (it's a software built in your mac).


@elia wrote:

If you just need to transfer your pictures from your Canon to your Mac (> mojave), just use Image Capture (it's a software built in your mac).


I appreciate your intention to help me, and I do know about Image Capture etc. in Mac already, but that is no solution for me since I work only with raw files, and use Adobe Bridge, CameraRaw and Photshop (all 2020 software versions). There are other ways to download images while I wait for EOS Utility 3 and/or Mac OS Catalina to be updated.

 

Regards

/B 

 

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