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Entry level RX camera

pkbiswas
Contributor
Dear friends. Thks very much for your support and valuable information. This encouraged me to ask more questions.,
Which model is d entry level RX model in Canon. How much does it differ from Canon 70D in image quality and performance. Does it have an edge over Nikon's entry level RX camera.
12 REPLIES 12

jrhoffman75
Legend

Not sure what an RX camera is.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, LR Classic

I mean full frame camera. Whether Canon 70D is a full frame camera? Whether a full frame camera will have marked difference in image quality than a crop sensor camera except in low light photography??

Hi Pkbiswas. 

 

The entry level full frame camera is the 6d.  I have one and I love it.

 

The 70d is not a full frame camera. It has a smaller "cropped" sensor. 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?


@pkbiswas wrote:
I mean full frame camera. Whether Canon 70D is a full frame camera? Whether a full frame camera will have marked difference in image quality than a crop sensor camera except in low light photography??

Yes, the EOS 6D is currently Canon's entry level full-frame DSLR.

 

All things being equal, one of the biggest differences between full frame and crop sensor cameras has to be depth-of-field.  Give each type of camera the same angle-of-view at a subject, and the full-frame sensor will have a shallower depth-of-field.  In other words, an 80mm lens on a full-frame sensor can give you shallower DOF than a 50mm on a crop sensor.

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

ebiggs1
Legend

"Does it have an edge over Nikon's entry level RX camera."

 

Nikon has a DX and a FX model.  Is that what you are meaning?

In a Nikon, the DX is similar to the Canon 'crop' cameras like the Rebel series.  The FX is a full frame camera similar to the Canon 6D and 5D Mk III.

 

Sony has an RX camera.  It is a point and shoot.  The top of the line Canon is the G1x Mk II.

 

Model for model cameras, the Nikon and Canon are very similar.  Nobody but nobody has the lens line up that Canon has.  And the lens is where it's at.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

If you live in the US (I don't) and your hands aren't too big you may want to check your local WalMart for a Canon SL 1. One of the forums I follow says WalMart is clearing them out at $299 & that's with the 18-55 kit lens. Very good entry level camera well below the usual price. 

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

Dear Mr Cicopo,

 

 

Thank you for your patient hearing. I live in India. I mean which is the Canon's entry level full format camera. Whether Canon 70D is a full format camera. WIll there be marked difference between a full format camera and crop camera in image quality except for low light photography. Whether Canon 70D can perform better at low light??


@pkbiswas wrote:

Dear Mr Cicopo,

 

 

....WIll there be marked difference between a full format camera and crop camera in image quality except for low light photography. 


1.) "Low light" conditions are very common, so the low light advantage is not a small thing.  Keep in mind that "low light" to a camera is not really all that low.  Your eyes are way more sensitive to light than a camera is, and you can see fine in light that will make your camera struggle.  Indoor lighting at night time can often be low light to a camera even though you can see just fine with your eyes.  

2.)  Grain, noise and lack of detail are what you have to deal with in low light.  When the camera needs more light, and you have already opened up the lens to its largest aperture opening size, and you are already using the slowest shutter speed you can use without getting blurry pictures, then the only thing the camera can do is to raise the ISO, which is the light sensitivity of the lens sensor. Unfortunately this carries a cost, in that it lowers the image quality in two ways.  First, it creates "noise", which appears as grainy and/or colored little splotches.  Second, at high ISO the camera captures less and less detail.  Especially if you crop the image in post processing, or if you have a large monitor, you will notice the image is kind of blocky and things like facial features (eyes, lips, etc.) will have a weird low resolution quality, and you may not be able to see fine details like eyelashes as well as you could at lower ISO settings.  

 

(At this point someone on the board may find the urge is nearly irresistable to post one of their photos shot at high ISO's that looks OK, and may question my technique, or question the reliance on what you see in a big 30" computer monitor instead of what you would see if you made 8" x 10" prints of everything instead.) 🙂

 

The larger pixels in the typical full frame sensor give better image quality at higher ISO's.  Up to about two stops better, which means when you have to raise the ISO setting in low light, the full frame sensor will give equivalent image quality to a crop sensor when the full frame is shooting in 1/4th the light.  For example, an image shot with a full frame 6d set to ISO 3200 may look as good as an image from a crop camera set at just ISO 800.  

 

This is very approximate, and the exact numbers will vary depending on what cameras are used.  Some of the new mega high MP full frame cameras have to use pretty small pixels, so the advantage erodes a bit.

 

 

 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?

As I understand full frame camera has a bigger sensor hence works very good in low light condition. Does it mean that it will produce good image quality indoor with normal lighting without using a flash??
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