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Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,033
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: 750D delay on continuously long exposure shooting

I tried an experiment with my Canon 1D X. It has a 12 frame per second potential frame rate. If I set the time to 10 seconds there was a definite pause between shots. Yet, at 1/1000 of a second it fires like a machine gun.

Why would you shoot teo 10 second light painting shots rather than one 20 second shot?

When I’ve shot star trails I expose for twenty seconds, pause 1 second then shoot again, repeating for twenty shots and blend using a star stacking program. I use a remote controller.
John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic
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Posts: 10,584
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: 750D delay on continuously long exposure shooting

“I tried an experiment with my Canon 1D X. It has a 12 per second potential frame rate. If I set the time to 10 seconds there was a definite pause between shots. Yet, at 1/1000 of a second it fires like a machine gun.“

If you were shooting RAW, then maybe it is building the JPEG preview image during that pause.
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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,033
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: 750D delay on continuously long exposure shooting


@Waddizzle wrote:
“I tried an experiment with my Canon 1D X. It has a 12 per second potential frame rate. If I set the time to 10 seconds there was a definite pause between shots. Yet, at 1/1000 of a second it fires like a machine gun.“

If you were shooting RAW, then maybe it is building the JPEG preview image during that pause.

Possibly - since OP is shooting RAW same might be happening with his camera.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic
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Re: 750D delay on continuously long exposure shooting


@WimVanCraen wrote:

"There is nothing wrong with your camera. Every DSLR camera body does what you are experiencing. You need to revise your expectations downward. That is my advice."

 

I've seen Nikon cameras where this wasn't an issue. There was no delay there... Smiley Indifferent


Here is a recent thread with links that show you how a mirror works, and why your Nikon claim is demonstrably false.  There is a link in the first post to video that shows how a mirror and the shutter work together.

 

https://community.usa.canon.com/t5/General-Camera-Discussion/You-wanna-see-mirror-slap/td-p/289409 

 

This is how a DSLR works, and how it differs from a mirrorless camera.  If you watched the video, then you saw how the mirror would open, then shutter would expose the image sensor, and finally the mirror would drop back down.  When do you think the image data gets sampled?

 

The image data in DSLR gets sampled AFTER the mirror drops back in place.  

 

The data has been captured by the camera, and the camera can read the data line by line, row by row, or whatever.  The point is that the image sensor is no longer exposed to light when it is being read, which means the data is STATIC, and not changing.

 

A mirrorless camera has no mirror, to block off the light.from reaching the shutter and the image sensor.  Mirrorless cameras must read the image data VERY quickly when in continuous shooting mode, while the shutter is closed.  The image data is not static, and is constantly changing.  This can be a problem when subjects are moving within the frame.

 

Sampling dynamic image data can result in "rollling shutter" effects on moving subjects   This effect is readily apparent with video shot from a moving vehicle.  All of the light poles will look bent.

 

Back to the mirror in a DSLR.  What this means is that DSLRs, all DSLRs will always have a slight pause between frames.  This is a fact, without exception.  Why the pause is apparently longer with slower shutter speeds is a good question.  But, it is a normal behavior of all DSLRs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."
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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎11-22-2019

Re: 750D delay on continuously long exposure shooting

Feedback from the canon support desk:

"Thank you for contacting Canon.

Hereby we can inform you that how the EOS 750d works, where you describe that it is 1 to 2 sec. takes before a new recording is made is not a defect of the EOS 750D. This is because the sensor data is stored during this time. And so it is not possible to immediately start a new recording. We see this as normal for the moment. Once the sensor data (data) has been saved, a new recording can only be made.

If you have any further questions, you can contact us by replying to this message.

Kind regards,

Saraah

Canon Services & Support"

Case closed. Unfortunately
Thanks for the replies here
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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎11-22-2019

Re: 750D delay on continuously long exposure shooting

"Why would you shoot teo 10 second light painting shots rather than one 20 second shot?

When I’ve shot star trails I expose for twenty seconds, pause 1 second then shoot again, repeating for twenty shots and blend using a star stacking program. I use a remote controller."

 

For your information: I use the 10" to prevent the light pollution here in Belgium :-) If you go higher, more and more light coming from the light pollution is captered

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