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My EOS Kiss X7 Suddenly Stopped Working

Marky1
Contributor

Okay okay, soo on september 1 I used my camera to capture my classmates and soo other things it worked perfectly fine then I got home transfered my canon sdcard to my phone to post the pic then put it back again, then on september 2 after I charged my camera and start using it again to capture what I always do to our school it suddenly stopped working, I thought it might got overcharged soo i bought a new one but still doesn't work, I tried searching it on youtube and follow their step and still doesn't work, can someone help me please?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

@Marky1,

What kvbarkley was trying to establish was power activity.  Does the camera exhibit any signs of life when a freshly charged battery is inserted or if the SD Card activity light flickers when a card is inserted?  When a charged battery is installed, the red read/write LED will flicker when the card is inserted and the door is closed. 

Since you have purchased a new battery, if nothing happens when you try to turn the camera on or insert a memory card, either your battery charger has died and is not charging your batteries or the camera itself has suffered some kind of mechanical failure. 

If you want to test your battery, you can charge the battery and use a ohms meter to confirm correct voltage and amps.  if your battery is good, then its the camera.  About all you can do is look in the battery slot and confirm the contacts are not dirty or bent.  If the battery is good, and the slot looks ok, its probably time to replace your 10 yr old body.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10

~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8 ~CarePaks Are Worth It

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9 REPLIES 9

kvbarkley
VIP
VIP

Were these original canon batteries?

Does it do *anything* when you try to turn it on?

Still not, even when I'm using them or use a different batteries it still works before 

kvbarkley
VIP
VIP

Does the SD access light flash when you insert an SD card or turn on the camera?

What do you mean by "It still works before?"

I mean if you think the real reason why my camera doesn't turn on because of those fake batteries, well I've been using em for almost 2-3 years now and still no issue

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

@Marky1,

What kvbarkley was trying to establish was power activity.  Does the camera exhibit any signs of life when a freshly charged battery is inserted or if the SD Card activity light flickers when a card is inserted?  When a charged battery is installed, the red read/write LED will flicker when the card is inserted and the door is closed. 

Since you have purchased a new battery, if nothing happens when you try to turn the camera on or insert a memory card, either your battery charger has died and is not charging your batteries or the camera itself has suffered some kind of mechanical failure. 

If you want to test your battery, you can charge the battery and use a ohms meter to confirm correct voltage and amps.  if your battery is good, then its the camera.  About all you can do is look in the battery slot and confirm the contacts are not dirty or bent.  If the battery is good, and the slot looks ok, its probably time to replace your 10 yr old body.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10

~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8 ~CarePaks Are Worth It

We'll sir, I don't think the battery or the charget is the problem because it still turn orange when its not full and turns green if fully charged, if I put my fully charged battery on my dslr no flick or sign of light, I have to ask if its true that canon camera has a lifespan?

 

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

"... well I've been using em for almost 2-3 years now and still no issue"

 

Really not proof they are still good. They can charge to what seems proper and still not have the "power" to run the camera. Voltage is not the only determining factor. The new battery you bought is it an off brand also? Is the charger an off brand as well? If you contact Canon they will instruct you to use Canon brand batteries and a Canon brand charger as a test first. Not often but I have seen off brand batteries damage a camera or cause strange things to happen with the camera. I know Canon batteries cost more and everyone likes to save money but sometimes there is good reason the buy the correct Canon battery. And truth be known the off brand batteries seem to work most of the time.

I would suggest you get the correct Canon battery (and charger) and if the Rebel still is inoperative it is probably faulty and needs service.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

@marky1,

There is no set "lifespan".  Products are typically supported for about 10 yrs due to manufacturing and parts availability.  However, all hardware fails.  (Eventually)  Camera, laptop, printer or the blender in your kitchen.  Sooner or later.  If you have had 10 good years with your camera, that's great.  Look at this as an opportunity to upgrade.  I have an old SD 870 IS that still works.  It must be 17 yrs old now.  The shredder in my office is only 5 and although it was only lightly used, stopped working about a month ago.  All hardware fails.  😁          

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10

~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8 ~CarePaks Are Worth It

BurnUnit
Whiz

What you may be seeing, especially when dealing with an older used battery, is a condition called a "surface charge". At least that's what it was referred to as when dealing with auto and truck lead-acid batteries.

A battery can be put on a charger and eventually reach its rated operating voltage. When it reaches that point the charger senses that voltage and is shut off. But reading only the battery's voltage places no real load on the battery. To be truly usable the battery needs a "deep charge" to withstand the usage loads put upon it. The battery may have the specified voltage, but it also needs an amperage rating sufficient to handle the loads put upon it when in use.

A well used but worn out battery in your car may still show 12.8 volts on a meter. But putting a load on the battery, like trying to start it on a cold morning or even turning on the headlamps, will require more amperage than the battery can supply. And the battery voltage will drop considerably and you're going nowhere. When the load is removed the battery voltage may come back up to some degree but there's still not enough amperage in reserve to do any real work. It just doesn't have a "deep" enough charge.

I can see the same thing happening with camera batteries. Your charger and camera may detect the proper battery voltage under a no-load condition. But turning the camera on and adding the load required to power up a processor, a couple LCD panels, image stabilization, automatic sensor cleaning and maybe a few self-test functions will quickly deplete what little amperage a weak, worn out or defective battery may have had. And you're left, temporarily at least, with an expensive brick hooked to that strap around your neck.

 

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