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EOS T6i

kohsuethao
Apprentice

What are some affordable lens that can achieve the blurr effect??? I'm pretty noob to photography, and never really did anything fancy with my T6I. 

 

Thanks!!

6 REPLIES 6

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

@kohsuethao wrote:

What are some affordable lens that can achieve the blurr effect??? I'm pretty noob to photography, and never really did anything fancy with my T6I. 

 

Thanks!!


What lenses do you currently own.  

 

You can probably do it with your current lenses, any one of them, depending upon what result you want.  What I am saying is that creating background blur is less about lens selection, and more about exposure settings and distance to the subject.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

@kohsuethao wrote:

What are some affordable lens that can achieve the blurr effect??? I'm pretty noob to photography, and never really did anything fancy with my T6I. 

 

Thanks!!


What lenses do you currently own.  

 

You can probably do it with your current lenses, any one of them, depending upon what result you want.  What I am saying is that creating background blur is less about lens selection, and more about exposure settings and distance to the subject.


94E14931-5EE6-440B-9D51-9C7CA7F90C10.jpeg

 

 

The above photo was shot using a setting that is probably already in your camera bag.  100mm, f/5.6, at a SHORT distance.

 

Do a web search for articles about “ Depth of Field “ and “ Exposure Triangle “..

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@kohsuethao wrote:

What are some affordable lens that can achieve the blurr effect??? I'm pretty noob to photography, and never really did anything fancy with my T6I. 

 

Thanks!!


It depends on how much blur you want and how close you need to be to the subject. You probably want a lens with a maximum aperture of at least f/2.8 at whatever focal length you're using. And of course it depends on your definition of "affordable".

 

Set your current lens to its maximum aperture and do some experimenting. And since you're relatively new to all this, take Waddizzle's point and start reading up on the effects of focal length, camera-to-subject distance, etc.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

kvbarkley
VIP
VIP

If you don't want macro, the EF50mm/f1.8. If you do want Macro, the EF-S 60mm/f2.8

True you can force it to happen with nearly any lens, the 50mm f/1.8 STM is only about $110.00 and it will give you a chance to play with big apertures for effortless blur and it will also be a very valuable tool for working in dim light. 

 

To make a blur:

 

1.). Set the lowest f/number your lens will let you do. Use Av mode to do this. 

2.). If it is a kit zoom, zoom in as far as you can make work (55mm, not 18mm). 

3.). Get close to the subject.

4.). Make the background as far behind your subject as you can manage. 

 

 

 

 

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?

Mr_Fusion
Enthusiast

Any lens will give you out of focus backgrounds. However, some lenses will work better than others. 

 

I suggest a EF-50mm -f1.8. You can find a used one for around $50 or less. You can use any lens but that will give you some satisfactory shots  with less effort on your part. Plus, it makes for a decent low light lens.

 

Keep in mind that what is out of focus doesn't always need to be totally recognizable in order to work. Sometimes a slight blur that is recognizable adds context. Other times totally out of focus can frame the subject. 

 

Generally, the further from the focal point, the more out of focus. That applies more to what is behind the subject more than what is in front. So, the closer you are to your subject, the further away the background becomes. (Yes, there are ratios and formulas where you can calculate everything based upon all the variables. Or, you can just generalize and leave the calculator at home.) This can be a problem, especially in macro photography and with extension tubes. 

 

The second major attribute is the aperture. The larger the aperture (the smaller the number as this too is a ratio) the shorter the depth of field (DOF). This will increase the out of focus (OOF) behind the subject. It also shortens the amount of your subject in focus. The smaller the aperture (larger f number) the larger the DOF. 

 

Applying those two principles can give you some nice controlled DOF and bokeh (the quality of the OOF). Experimenting and trying different things is the best way to learn. Keep in mind, there have been books written on DOF and bokeh so you'll never get a full answer in a comment section. Do a search for "bokeh" for many articles that may help your practical understanding.

 

Good luck..

 

 

 

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