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EOS R5/R6 launch

John_SD
Whiz

Looking forward Canon's offical online product launch tomorrow. Photos have leaked, and it seems that the EOS R5 and R6 will both have joysticks. I am encouraged that Canon has abandoned the awful and universally panned touchbar. The R5 tech seems more geared to videographers, but that is not surprising given that so many now buy cameras to use as camcorders. Why, I don't know, but that is the trend. The R6 seems more appealing to me as someone who is more interested in photography rather than creating YouTube videos. I think there is still time to sign up for the online launch. 

45 REPLIES 45

ScottS
Enthusiast

Considering upgrading to mirrorless, but cannot at this time afford the R5 (though I would love to eventually!)

 

But I am disappointed by the R6 20.1 megapixel rating. I know it is feature rich like the R5 in many ways, with IBIS, Dual Card Slots, video capacities, and more. And I understand that 20.1 is no "slouch."

 

As a Senior Portrait Photographer, Travel Photographer, and Family Session Photographer part-time, my biggest concern is image quality for stills. I am not needing video at this time.

 

It is past time for me to upgrade, as a 6D user. It is a decent, solid camera, but those RF lenses honestly have me drooling. Currently I shoot my portraits mostly with the Canon 85mm 1.8, the Nifty-Fifty, and the Canon 135mm 2.0. The images are good. 

 

So here is my question:

 

Canon EOS R with 30.3MP

OR

Canon R6 with 20.1MP

as a shooter not concerned with IBIS, Dual Card Slots, or Video.


Thanks for your input :)!

Scott S


@ScottS wrote:

 

So here is my question:

 

Canon EOS R with 30.3MP

OR

Canon R6 with 20.1MP

as a shooter not concerned with IBIS, Dual Card Slots, or Video.


Thanks for your input :)!

Scott S


Your statement says you are a 'Senior Portrait Photographer, Travel Photographer, and Family Session Photographer part-time' I am not sure what the designation Senior represents, but I take you that you do photography part-time and have another career. I can find no bio information in your profile, so please bear with me if I ask a couple of questions...

 

What is your output?   How BIG an image do you need to print?  What is your budget?

 

See the comments of two expert professional photographers starting at time 28:20 in THIS VIDEO.

In particular, according to a highly-regarded professional fashion and portrait photographer in the video in my link, he can print 30"x46" image (life-size) image with excellent resolution. (time 31:02).

 

I am suprised that you would be down on a sensor of 20 MP resolution: professionals have been shooting with that resolution for years and getting great results.  You describe the EOS 6D as a 'decent, solid camera', and that has a similar sized sensor, so if you are getting acceptable results with that then you should have no issues.  The R6 should easily surpass the EOS 6D in terms of dynamic range, low light performance, focusing and image quality overall - it IS based on the sensor of the EOS 1DXIII, after all.  Much of the rest comes down to lenses and how you use the camera.

 

As a professional, I would be surprised that you would not value having dual SD cards, something that has been called for by pro's for some time to reduce the risk of card failure, and that clients will not tolerate if it impacts on their product delivery. This is particularly signficant for events you cannot repeat, like travel, family reunions and weddings.  This is one advantage of the R6 has over the R5, which has the second card set up for high resolution video recording, and would be less useful to you.  Furthermore the R5 has more investment in Hi-Res video work, something you are not paying for in the R6, yet you get virtually all of the other photographic features.

 

Unless you shoot with a tripod - somewhat challenging to do at social events and for travel, then IBIS, combined with in lens stabilization (unique to Canon) will offer you much better performance in terms of hit rate, especially with the EF 135L 2.0 you say you shoot with that has no stabilization.

 

Again, because we have no budget, it is hard to look at the economics of your decision.  You seem to want high resolution, yet you have kept the 6D at 20MP when the 6DII with 24MP became available, along with other cameras with MUCH higher resolution like the 5DsR at 51MP, so I assume cost is significant to you.  

 

Furthermore, your lenses appear to be 2x EF (but not L) lenses and one EF-L older lens.  While these may render acceptable results with a 20MP sensor, you may find them seriously challenged with a 45MP unit.  You probably want to investigate that, as you may need to upgrade your lenses to use the R5 more than the R6 go get the best out of the much higher resolution unit. That will signifcantly add to the cost of the R5 option, whereas you may get away with what you have using the R6.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

I saw on one of the Canon videos that if you are using an adapter and EF lense, you will get both IBIS and Lense IS, but that they will not "work together" as they will with RF lenses.

 

Just want to make sure I'm hearing this right: if you're using an EF lense with IS, you could (should?) keep it on even if also using IBIS. Does that sound correct from others' understanding?

 

Billy


@coachboz68 wrote:

I saw on one of the Canon videos that if you are using an adapter and EF lense, you will get both IBIS and Lense IS, but that they will not "work together" as they will with RF lenses.

 

Just want to make sure I'm hearing this right: if you're using an EF lense with IS, you could (should?) keep it on even if also using IBIS. Does that sound correct from others' understanding?

 

Billy


Hi Billy


My understanding is that lens IS works with IBIS on the Canon.  I am not sure why one would want to turn it off in that situation as you get an advantage from both, according to what I have seen - you may not get the full sum of the two IS values though.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris


@Tronhard wrote:

@coachboz68 wrote:

I saw on one of the Canon videos that if you are using an adapter and EF lense, you will get both IBIS and Lense IS, but that they will not "work together" as they will with RF lenses.

 

Just want to make sure I'm hearing this right: if you're using an EF lense with IS, you could (should?) keep it on even if also using IBIS. Does that sound correct from others' understanding?

 

Billy


Hi Billy


My understanding is that lens IS works with IBIS on the Canon.  I am not sure why one would want to turn it off in that situation as you get an advantage from both, according to what I have seen - you may not get the full sum of the two IS values though.


According to Rudy Winston's video clip, the IBIS apparently has two operating modes, depending upon whether or not you are using an RF lens or EF lens with the adapter

 

With an RF lens, the IBIS will work in conjunction with the IS in the lens, which will give 5-axis stabilization.  With a couple of the fast primes, you are supposed to be able to get an extra half stop of stabilization, despite the fact that the primes do not have IS.

 

With an EF lens, you must use the mount adapter, you will not get the same level of integration with the IS in the lens.  Instead of 5-axis stabilization, you will get horizontal or vertical panning stabilization, which will be similar to what you may get from IS Mode switches on L Series telephoto zooms

 

BTW, when comes to image stabilization IBS works better with wide angle lenses, while IS in the lens works better with telephoto lenses.  .

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

"BTW, when comes to image stabilization IBS works better with wide angle lenses, while IS in the lens works better with telephoto lenses. "

Indeed, in any case, the IS can be tuned for that lens, which is what you really want, anyway.

Thanks, Kevin and @Tronhard.  

Hi Bill

 

I hope you are keep safe and well where you are!

 

Given some EF lenses have no IS, that is still quite a bonus! Obviously the serious will go and re-invest in RF glass, but for those less committed, or while they make the transition, having that IBIS can't hurt.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris


@Waddizzle wrote:

 

According to Rudy Winston's video clip, the IBIS apparently has two operating modes, depending upon whether or not you are using an RF lens or EF lens with the adapter (snip)



Thanks, Wadizzle, for the explanation of what the true "cooperation" will entail. 


@Tronhard wrote:

@ScottS wrote:

 

So here is my question:

 

Canon EOS R with 30.3MP

OR

Canon R6 with 20.1MP

as a shooter not concerned with IBIS, Dual Card Slots, or Video.


Thanks for your input :)!

Scott S


Your statement says you are a 'Senior Portrait Photographer, Travel Photographer, and Family Session Photographer part-time' I am not sure what the designation Senior represents, but I take you that you do photography part-time and have another career. I can find no bio information in your profile, so please bear with me if I ask a couple of questions...

 

What is your output?   How BIG an image do you need to print?  What is your budget?

 

See the comments of two expert professional photographers starting at time 28:20 in THIS VIDEO.

In particular, according to a highly-regarded professional fashion and portrait photographer in the video in my link, he can print 30"x46" image (life-size) image with excellent resolution. (time 31:02).

 

I am suprised that you would be down on a sensor of 20 MP resolution: professionals have been shooting with that resolution for years and getting great results.  You describe the EOS 6D as a 'decent, solid camera', and that has a similar sized sensor, so if you are getting acceptable results with that then you should have no issues.  The R6 should easily surpass the EOS 6D in terms of dynamic range, low light performance, focusing and image quality overall - it IS based on the sensor of the EOS 1DXIII, after all.  Much of the rest comes down to lenses and how you use the camera.

 

As a professional, I would be surprised that you would not value having dual SD cards, something that has been called for by pro's for some time to reduce the risk of card failure, and that clients will not tolerate if it impacts on their product delivery. This is particularly signficant for events you cannot repeat, like travel, family reunions and weddings.  This is one advantage of the R6 has over the R5, which has the second card set up for high resolution video recording, and would be less useful to you.  Furthermore the R5 has more investment in Hi-Res video work, something you are not paying for in the R6, yet you get virtually all of the other photographic features.

 

Unless you shoot with a tripod - somewhat challenging to do at social events and for travel, then IBIS, combined with in lens stabilization (unique to Canon) will offer you much better performance in terms of hit rate, especially with the EF 135L 2.0 you say you shoot with that has no stabilization.

 

Again, because we have no budget, it is hard to look at the economics of your decision.  You seem to want high resolution, yet you have kept the 6D at 20MP when the 6DII with 24MP became available, along with other cameras with MUCH higher resolution like the 5DsR at 51MP, so I assume cost is significant to you.  

 

Furthermore, your lenses appear to be 2x EF (but not L) lenses and one EF-L older lens.  While these may render acceptable results with a 20MP sensor, you may find them seriously challenged with a 45MP unit.  You probably want to investigate that, as you may need to upgrade your lenses to use the R5 more than the R6 go get the best out of the much higher resolution unit. That will signifcantly add to the cost of the R5 option, whereas you may get away with what you have using the R6.


Thanks very much for your thorough response, Tronhard. I have been out of town and am just now getting back to you. By Senior Portrait Photographer, I mean specifically portraits of students who will be seniors. I've done 10 of those sessions, being new to professional photography. I am not a wedding shooter, and have no plans to move to that realm. I have been a professional music educator for 38 years, and now am in "Re-Creation" mode, both doing portrait photography, guiding groups to India (travel photography) and giving music lessons. 


My output is mostly senior portrait photography. Yet when we are in India, that photography includes Himalayan Mountain Landscapes. I do not print very often, but in the future may. My budget is that the R5 is out right now, but the R6 and R are "in" the realm. 

 

I will DEFINITELY watch the video that you included. Thank-you for that!


I am not specifically "down" on 20MP per se. But the only reason I have not yet upgraded to mirrorless was financial. My 6D has had to work for me up to this point. I know that the 6DII, 5D Mark IV and the EOS R are ALL "better" in terms of MP IQ. But again, I've not been able to upgrade. I am happy with most images, but certainly not the focal points of the 6D. That is an area where the EOS R thrilled me as I read more about it online. 

 

My feeling is that in 2020, I thought the R6 would just come out at least equal to the EOS R in MP. I can't argue that 20MP CAN be "enough," as it has had to be for me up until now. But I reserve the right for my disappointment in what seems lacking. I know the R5 is "the bomb," but again, if I can't afford that, I was hoping the R6 would at least be an improvement in this area. 

 

I've got more lenses than the two I named, but indeed have all along been planning on upgrading to RF lenses as money permits. In particular, I am eyeing the Canon 85mm1.2 RF for portraiture. Pricey, but stunning. So that IS on my radar of needs no matter which mirrorless direction I go.


Current Lenses (All Canon)

50mm 1.8 STM

135mm 2.0 L

16-35mm 4.0 L

70-200mm 4.0 L

24-105mm 4.0 L

85mm 1.8


Thanks again for your input and share, Tronhard. Can't wait to watch that video.

All My Best!

Scott S

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