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Canon R5 with RF 600 F4 - Battery Issues

PauloArielP
Apprentice

Hello, I have a Canon RF 600 F4 and use it on an R5 body, from what I understand the battery power on the R5 is not enough to drive both focus motors on the lens.

My question is, would having a battery grip with access to 2 batteries simultaneously help this deliver more power to drive AF faster? Or the only alternative is another camera body with bigger battery? 

4 REPLIES 4

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Greetings,

A battery grip would not increase the amount of "power" available to the camera or lens.  It would increase the length of time or duration it could be used. 

You are the first person I have heard from making any reference to power related issues on the R5 in relation to focus motor(s) on a lens.  

I made a similar reference on Canon Rumors regarding the RP and got flamed for it. It however does have a smaller battery.  

A good V mount, USB-C PD or grip would help with longevity.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10, 430EX III-RT ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8
~CarePaks Are Worth It

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

I would doubt that in general that is the case.  What you may be referring to is a limitation by which as the battery drains one may not be able to get the highest frame rate.  For a detailed report on this see:
Powering the EOS R5: Review of the LP-e6NH & Other Options - Camnostic

I believe Canon themselves make reference to this in some of their documentations, certainly I have seen comments in technical reviews.  The RF 100-500 I use also uses dual nano-USM motors and I have never had an issue, but I don't push it to H+ speed for extended periods, and I always use a battery grip in any case for balance with a heavier lens and to gain the ergonomic benefits of the portrait-mode controls.

This phenomenon is not limited to Canon, in fact the inclusion of the LP-E6NH batteries is apparently an effort to increase the level of battery drain that is tolerated at higher shutter speeds, particularly in mechanical mode.
The development of much higher frame rates is a relatively new phenomenon, and one can see the reaction by camera makers to include higher-capacity batteries in models that have seriously upped that value.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

A battery [grip] does not use both batteries simultaneously.  Instead, the camera alternates between one battery and the other.  This causes the charge in each battery to be used at roughly the same rate.  At least that is how they worked with DSLRs. 

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Agreed.  However the  benefit is that with a larger reservoir that capacity is able to sustain the higher frame rate for longer without actually shutting down and switching batteries, then turning back on again.  I have not personally tested this because I don't shoot in H+ for extended periods.  It might impact videographers much more, for example.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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