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Astrophotography Setting for EOS RP

tstevens83
Apprentice

I have a modified EOS RP that I have been using for astrophotography.  I have reading a lot on what DSLR settings would make the best images including Craig Stark (http://www.stark-labs.com/craig/resources/Articles-&-Reviews/CanonLinearity.pdf).  Craig ran exposure experiments on his Rebel XSi with Digic III processor.  He knows that Digic III changes the RAW image and concludes "The camera’s internal gain (e-/ADU) for each ISO value points toward limiting the ISO to 400 and not using higher values. Both in theory and in practice, using higher values limits the dynamic range and does not let you pull out fainter details from the noise (even if they look brighter)."  I personally have been using 12800 ISO with no issues.  However, I have only been shooting deep space objects for about a year, so I'm still learning.  I'm concerned about introducing too much noise with the higher ISO.  I'm wondering how much the Digic 8 processor changes the results of Craig's experiment, i.e. 400 ISO limit.  Does anyone have experience with using the EOS RP in astrophotography and has optimized the settings?

2 REPLIES 2

Hammond69
Apprentice

@tstevens83 wrote: www.myindigocard.com

I have a modified EOS RP that I have been using for astrophotography.  I have reading a lot on what DSLR settings would make the best images including Craig Stark (http://www.stark-labs.com/craig/resources/Articles-&-Reviews/CanonLinearity.pdf).  Craig ran exposure experiments on his Rebel XSi with Digic III processor.  He knows that Digic III changes the RAW image and concludes "The camera’s internal gain (e-/ADU) for each ISO value points toward limiting the ISO to 400 and not using higher values. Both in theory and in practice, using higher values limits the dynamic range and does not let you pull out fainter details from the noise (even if they look brighter)."  I personally have been using 12800 ISO with no issues.  However, I have only been shooting deep space objects for about a year, so I'm still learning.  I'm concerned about introducing too much noise with the higher ISO.  I'm wondering how much the Digic 8 processor changes the results of Craig's experiment, i.e. 400 ISO limit.  Does anyone have experience with using the EOS RP in astrophotography and has optimized the settings?


Use this setting

  • Use a shutter speed of 30-seconds (30”).
  • Select your lens’s widest possible aperture (e.g. f/1.8 or f/2.8).
  • Use an ISO of 3200 or 6400 (higher if you have a slower lens)
  • Always shoot RAW for the capture the most detail possible.
  • Select Daylight White Balance.
  • Turn off noise reduction in the ‘Shooting Menu’.
  • For astrophotography it’s best to use Manual focussing to achieve the best results.

Isac789
Contributor

@VWCredit wrote:

I have a modified EOS RP that I have been using for astrophotography.  I have reading a lot on what DSLR settings would make the best images including Craig Stark (http://www.stark-labs.com/craig/resources/Articles-&-Reviews/CanonLinearity.pdf).  Craig ran exposure experiments on his Rebel XSi with Digic III processor.  He knows that Digic III changes the RAW image and concludes "The camera’s internal gain (e-/ADU) for each ISO value points toward limiting the ISO to 400 and not using higher values. Both in theory and in practice, using higher values limits the dynamic range and does not let you pull out fainter details from the noise (even if they look brighter)."  I personally have been using 12800 ISO with no issues.  However, I have only been shooting deep space objects for about a year, so I'm still learning.  I'm concerned about introducing too much noise with the higher ISO.  I'm wondering how much the Digic 8 processor changes the results of Craig's experiment, i.e. 400 ISO limit.  Does anyone have experience with using the EOS RP in astrophotography and has optimized the settings?


Use manual or bulb mode.
Use a “fast” aperture of F/2.8 – F/4.
Set your white balance setting to daylight or auto.
Set your exposure length to 15-30-seconds.
Shoot in RAW image format.
Use Manual Focus.
Use an ISO of 400-1600 (or more)
Use the 10-second delay drive mode.

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