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Accidental Lens Release

michaelgirman
Contributor

 

  My 24-105L just fell off my 5D mkIII and rolled into the Seine.  The lens release button is way too sensitive and it is so easy to accidentally unlock without realizing it.  I went to twist the zoom ring and the lens rotated and dropped off.  Blogs are full of compaints of this occurance on mkii's.  

  This is definitely a design flaw.  It's not user error.  The button should be relocated or made to require more force to release  or have a detent position.  

  It's a shame that you have to gaffer tape a $2300 lens to a $2000 camera.  Be forewarned.  

 

 

184 REPLIES 184

I have had the 10-400mm detach from a 20D and a 7D. I have also had teleconverters detach. It just happened 4 times in 5 minutes on the 7D. I always give the lens a good tug to make sure its engaged. I notice on the lens the hole where the body pin engages is somewhat oval not sure if that is a contributing factor?

 

Never had an accidental release with a 20D over many years. Never with a 70D for over one year then 3 or 4 times within 6 months with a 100-400mm II lens. Kind of surprising when it happens and difficult to reconstruct the cause.

 

I am a long-time (since 1972) user of Canon SLRs and DSLRs.

 

This is a design flaw.

 

Anyone who thinks those who have this happen are somehow careless can be sure that is not so in my case.


@FoxTalbot wrote:

Never had an accidental release with a 20D over many years. Never with a 70D for over one year then 3 or 4 times within 6 months with a 100-400mm II lens. Kind of surprising when it happens and difficult to reconstruct the cause.

 

I am a long-time (since 1972) user of Canon SLRs and DSLRs.

 

This is a design flaw.

 

Anyone who thinks those who have this happen are somehow careless can be sure that is not so in my case.


The Canon manuals all seem to suggest that one grip the lens with the palm underneath and the thumb on the side. If you follow that recommendation, I can almost see how your hand might sometimes hit the release button. But I find that position awkward anyway, and I think I'd have difficulty holding the camera steady. (Maybe it's the shape of my hand; I don't know.) The way I do hold it, with my fingers above and my thumb underneath the lens, I can't conceive of accidentally hitting the release button. Maybe you should try it; it might help solve your problem.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Bob from Boston,

"The way I do hold it, with my fingers above and my thumb underneath the lens, I can't conceive of accidentally hitting the release button."

 

I must say, neither do I.  As many lenses that I have and the ones I have had, I haven't seen it either. I haven't owned or used every Canon camera but certainly most of them, never seen it personally.  I suppose operator error can accomplish anything, though.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

Bob from Boston,

"The way I do hold it, with my fingers above and my thumb underneath the lens, I can't conceive of accidentally hitting the release button."

 

I must say, neither do I.  As many lenses that I have and the ones I have had, I haven't seen it either. I haven't owned or used every Canon camera but certainly most of them, never seen it personally.  I suppose operator error can accomplish anything, though.


I suspect the side of the thumb is the likely cause, when the entire hand gripd the lens body from underneath.  But, I would think that a similar risk would exist if you gripped the lens the other way, with the palm facing downward.

 

I know this might anger someone who's experienced an accidental lens release and a ruined lens, but pay more attention to what you're doing.  It's operator error, pure and simple.  Either you didn't lock the lens down and didn't check it, or your thumb/hand is contacting the lens release button. 

 

Every time I pull a camera out of my bag with a lens already attached, I check that the lens mount is secure.  I have pressed the release button before [and other buttons] simply by removing the lens from a bag.  It's easy to do when you're repositioning a camera on a tripod, too.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

I think the problem is caused by a variety of situations that can be almost eliminated by recessing the release button. Canon could easily do this in their new cameras. You can also do it yourself by gluing a piece of plastic around the proruding release button. I tried the latter and it seems to work.


@FoxTalbot wrote:

Never had an accidental release with a 20D over many years. Never with a 70D for over one year then 3 or 4 times within 6 months with a 100-400mm II lens. Kind of surprising when it happens and difficult to reconstruct the cause.

 

I am a long-time (since 1972) user of Canon SLRs and DSLRs.

 

This is a design flaw.

 

Anyone who thinks those who have this happen are somehow careless can be sure that is not so in my case.


With the EF 100-400mm II lens, the tripod foot rests on the heel of my left palm.  Ditto for the EF 70-200mm II lens, which is nearly identical in size and weight.

 

With smaller lenses, which lack a tripod foot, the lower left corner of the camera sits on the heel of my left palm.  I've found that to be the best way to hold the camera, and still be able to reach the DOF button with my ring finger.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

With the EF 100-400mm II lens, the tripod foot rests on the heel of my left palm.  Ditto for the EF 70-200mm II lens, which is nearly identical in size and weight.

 

With smaller lenses, which lack a tripod foot, the lower left corner of the camera sits on the heel of my left palm.  I've found that to be the best way to hold the camera, and still be able to reach the DOF button with my ring finger.


I find that I can reach the DOF button easily with the ring finger of my right hand.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@Waddizzle wrote:

With the EF 100-400mm II lens, the tripod foot rests on the heel of my left palm.  Ditto for the EF 70-200mm II lens, which is nearly identical in size and weight.

 

With smaller lenses, which lack a tripod foot, the lower left corner of the camera sits on the heel of my left palm.  I've found that to be the best way to hold the camera, and still be able to reach the DOF button with my ring finger.


I find that I can reach the DOF button easily with the ring finger of my right hand.


I think some of that depends upon the camera body.  The DOF preview button moves in different directions on different bodies, not to mention a being placed in a different location..

 

EOS_5D_Mark_III_DOF_PreviewButton_2.JPG

 

Above is the 5D Mark III.  The 7D Mark II is similar.  The button action is parallel to the lens, and pushes into the body.

 

EOS_1D_Mark_IV_DOF_PreviewButton_2.JPG

 

Above is the 1D Mark IV.  The 6D is similar.  The button action is perpendicular to the lens, and parallel to the front of the camera body.  Your ring finger would be extending itself to actuate that button, assuming that you could reach it.  I cannot.  A finger on the left hand, reaching underneath the body is used to actuate that button.

 

I think you and I have had this conversation before.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

I guess if it has never happened to you, it is hard to see how it could.  But one thing for sure it didn't happen the way some are saying it did.  There has to be some input, wanted or unwanted, from the user.  Plus I don't want Canon to do anything that makes it more difficult to change lenses.  I think most/all working pros would feel the same way.  The difference between the pro needs and the hobbyist needs I guess.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!
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