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250D vs 2000D for a beginner photographer

HuffingtonClove
Apprentice

Greetings, I'm yet to buy my first camera and I want to go into photography as a hobby (& to make money if there's a chance) I've been looking at the 2000D and the 250D, both touted as beginner cameras. Please help me choose between the two. Budget is not a big problem.

 
7 REPLIES 7

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

Before I could answer your question, I have a few of my own.  

 

How big of a hobby do you think photography will become?  Where do you plan to store the digital images?  What do you plan to do with the images, at least for now as you learn photography?

 

Those two models are the very entry level cameras, ones which photo enthusiasts outgrow well within a year's time.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend

@HuffingtonClove wrote:

Greetings, I'm yet to buy my first camera and I want to go into photography as a hobby (& to make money if there's a chance) I've been looking at the 2000D and the 250D, both touted as beginner cameras. Please help me choose between the two. Budget is not a big problem.

 

Welcome to the forum. 

Since you seem to have significant aspirations relative your photography hobby and since you state budget is not a problem I suggest you consider a 850D or even a 90D if you want a DSLR. Starting out you can use those cameras as a beginner device and graduate up. You cannot add capability to a 250D that it doesn't come with. 

Depending on how far your budget can stretch consider the R series mirrorless cameras. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

Agree with the previous person. If you can afford buying a better solution then it will give you much more value. Every hobby starts with high-quality equipment.

On the flip side.... even though budget doesn't seem to be an issue, do consider a cheaper DSLR with kit lens as your starting camera.   You can still learn all the fundamentals with it.  Then decide if photography is something you really want to pursue.

 

And then once you have a better handle of what features you'd ultimately want, move to the camera that most matches.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers

"And then once you have a better handle of what features you'd ultimately want, move to the camera that most matches."

 

 

And you have a decent back-up body.


@kvbarkley wrote:

"And then once you have a better handle of what features you'd ultimately want, move to the camera that most matches."

 

 

And you have a decent back-up body.


I still think a "full size" Rebel is better than that series of cameras.  

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

"I still think a "full size" Rebel is better than that series of cameras."

 

I second this but I don't recommend anyone buy a DSLR, Rebel or otherwise, any longer. However, if you must, a full on Rebel like the T8i is the best choice.  If your "hobby" takes off for you, you will be buying a mirrorless camera.  Just a fact!  It is cheaper and makes far better economic sense to start with what will eventually be the norm.  And, if you find you don't have the photo guts, a mirrorless will be saleable whereas a Rebel may not be.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!
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