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I've just purchased the Rebel T3 EOS 1100D. Are any of the Tamron all in one zoom lenses compatible?

slowshot
Apprentice

Are any of the Tamron all in zoom lenses compatible with the Rebel T3 EOS 1100D? I am looking for a lens like the 18/200, 18/270 or the28/300. I've just purchased the Rebel T3. I had an older Rebel,  the 350D EOS, which I used for several years with the Tamron 18/200. However the reason I got the new camera is that the old one quit working. I kept coming up with "Error message # 990". This error message is " lens is not compatible". Well it was for several years. So before I purchase the Tamron lens, I'm lookong for feed back.

4 REPLIES 4

cicopo
Elite

You're old camera & lens likely ran into one of many possible electrical problems, which happens to most things eventually. IF the Tamron is designed to fit the EF-S mount & isn't really old it should work perfectly & if you buy new from a store it's going to be compatible. I can say I owned & used the first version of the 18-270 & although it wasn't razor sharp I was happy with it for the range it covered.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."


@cicopo wrote:

You're old camera & lens likely ran into one of many possible electrical problems, which happens to most things eventually. IF the Tamron is designed to fit the EF-S mount & isn't really old it should work perfectly & if you buy new from a store it's going to be compatible. I can say I owned & used the first version of the 18-270 & although it wasn't razor sharp I was happy with it for the range it covered.


To me, what stands out about the 18-270 is that it's the only DSLR lens I ever saw advertised in the Boston subway.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

amfoto1
Authority

Have you tried the old 18-200mm Tamron lens on your new camera (if you still have the lens)?

 

I suspect you mean Error 99 (not Error 990). If that's what you were getting with your older Rebel, it's not necessarily a lens problem. Error 99 is sort of a "catch all" code that means little more than "something isn't working right so the camera and lens are unable to function". It doesn't really tell you what's wrong. Might have been the lens. Or it might have been something else.

 

There is a possible problem using any third party lens such as the Tamron, that it won't be compatible with future camera models. Third party lens manufacturers reverse engineer their lenses to work on current and previous camera models. As a result, if something changes in future camera models, the lens may no longer be compatible.

 

There's far less chance of this occuring if you use OEM lenses.... i.e. Canon lenses on Canon cameras. In fact, I don't know of any significant incompatibility issues among all the EF lenses made for all the EOS cameras for the past 25 or so years. Canon designs their cameras with both forward and backward compatibility in mind. In fact, it's one of the defining characteristics of Canon's premium "L" series lenses, that they are fully compatible with all EOS cameras past, present and future. The same has been true, though, of Canon's non-L EF lenses. The only exception is EF-S lenses, which are designed especially for use only on APS-C crop sensor cameras such as your 350D and T3/1100D. All EF lenses also work fine on those cameras. But, by design, EF-S lenses cannot be used on full frame (6D, 5D-series, 1Ds-series) or fitted to some of the older APS-C crop sensor cameras (10D, D60, D30) that existed before any EF-S lenses were offered.  

While not guaranteed to be compatible with all future models the same as an "L", it's a pretty safe bet that Canon's non-L-series lenses will work fine on them too. So far Canon has been batting pretty close to 100%. .

 

There are some quite good third party lenses from Sigma, Tokina and Tamron (I use Tamron's 90mm f2.5 and 60mm f2.0 Macro lenses, for example). Some offer features not found on Canon lenses. And third partly lens prices can be attractive. Just be aware of this possible pitfall: If you choose to upgrade to another Canon camera model sometime in the future, the third party lens may not work properly. There's no guarantee it will.

 

If you buy a new Tamron lens now... a currently made model designed for Canon... It almost certainly is going to be compatible with a Canon camera model such as T3/1100D that's been available for a few years. Where I've noticed the most third party lens compatibility issues is with the newest Canon models that have different and more sophisticated autofocus systems (70D, 7D Mark II, for example). Canon has changed the design of their cameras to offer new features, and in some cases the third party lens manufacturers are still catching up.

 

***********
Alan Myers

San Jose, Calif., USA
"Walk softly and carry a big lens."
GEAR: 5DII, 7D(x2), 50D(x3), some other cameras, various lenses & accessories
FLICKR & PRINTROOM 

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

IMHO, the lowest line of third party lenses should be avoided.  You can tell this by the price.  If the lens is cheap, it is cheap!

Even when they work, they are not good or don't have good IQ.

That said Tamron and Sigma have lenses that are not just good, they are very good.  However, they are not "cheap".

For instance the Tamron 70-200mm f2.8 A009 model is not just good, it is fantastic.  Anything in the Sigma "Art" line is as good as it gets.  Most of Sigma's "EX" line is also very good.  Along with Tamron's 70-200mm f2.8 is their 24-70mm f2.8 also a very good lens.

 

"I am looking for a lens like the 18/200, 18/270 or the28/300."

 

Personally, I would avoid any of these out of the Canon line.  But in the end it is all in what you want.  What you can afford and can settle for.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!
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