cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Historgram for multiple photos?

Tintype_18
Mentor

I was taking some photos with my T7 a while back. The histogram was on the screen and bfrought a questionto mind. I have played with the histogram on DPP4. Could one use the "graph" on the histogram to adjust settings for f-stop, ISO, shutter speed, etc.? Thanks.

 

15 REPLIES 15

rs-eos
Whiz

I'm not sure what you're asking.  I haven't used DPP, but are you speaking to the ability to drag on various zones in the Histogram (what you can do in Lightroom) to adjust exposure, shadows, whites, etc.?

 

If so, the histogram is just a visual representation of the quantity of pixels at each level.  Camera histograms are non-adjustable in the sense they just show a read-only view of the photo's data.

 

Also, while dragging zones in a photo editor's histogram would change exposure, shadows, etc, it would not in any way affect the f-stop or shutter speed.

--
Ricky

EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L, 600EX-RT (x6), ST-E3-RT
EOS C70, RF 24-70 f/2.8L IS, EF-EOS R 0.71x

jrhoffman75
Legend

@Tintype_18 wrote:

I was taking some photos with my T7 a while back. The histogram was on the screen and bfrought a questionto mind. I have played with the histogram on DPP4. Could one use the "graph" on the histogram to adjust settings for f-stop, ISO, shutter speed, etc.? Thanks.

 


Expanding on Ricky's response:

 

1. if you are looking at the histogram when you are playing back an image already taken the histogram is history - it shows the image as you captured it.\

 

2. if you are using LiveView you can't adjust anything by using the histogram, but you can adjust camera settings and see how the histogram changes.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

Need to be a bit more precise here. The camera shows the histogram on the LCD screen. I'm thinking  I can take additional photos to "shift" the peaks and alleys of the histogram to affect the photo. Sort of "editing" with the settings.

John Hoffman's item #2 is what I'm looking at.

Thanks to all.

"... I can take additional photos to "shift" the peaks and alleys of the histogram to affect the photo."

 

The best place to use the histogram is in post editing. However, the most important parts are not the peaks and valleys but either end.  The histogram should go completely to each end. If you take a shot and notice that is doesn't you can try a different exposure setting to make sure that is does extend to both ends. The bottom line of the histogram that goes from left to right shows 0% brightness, or black, to 100% brightness, or white. Oh, BTW, your histogram should not spill over the ends either.

 

Always shoot Raw so you get the very most editing ability.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

You can only move the whole histogram to the left or the right. You cannot change the dynamic range (except with digital lighting optimiser). Besides, how will you tell the camera which to adjust: aperture, shutter or ISO?


@kvbarkley wrote:

You can only move the whole histogram to the left or the right. You cannot change the dynamic range (except with digital lighting optimiser). Besides, how will you tell the camera which to adjust: aperture, shutter or ISO?


Actually, you can "stretch" the dynamic range to a fairly significant degree.  I have watched a couple of astrophotography videos on YouTube that show you how to do it.  You will never go completely side to side.  But, you can take an image that is butting up against one side and stretch it out towards the center quite a bit.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

@kvbarkley wrote:

You can only move the whole histogram to the left or the right. You cannot change the dynamic range (except with digital lighting optimiser). Besides, how will you tell the camera which to adjust: aperture, shutter or ISO?


Actually, you can "stretch" the dynamic range to a fairly significant degree.  I have watched a couple of astrophotography videos on YouTube that show you how to do it.  You will never go completely side to side.  But, you can take an image that is butting up against one side and stretch it out towards the center quite a bit.


Please post a link to this. And remeber, we are talking in-camera, not in post.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic


@jrhoffman75 wrote:

@Waddizzle wrote:

@kvbarkley wrote:

You can only move the whole histogram to the left or the right. You cannot change the dynamic range (except with digital lighting optimiser). Besides, how will you tell the camera which to adjust: aperture, shutter or ISO?


Actually, you can "stretch" the dynamic range to a fairly significant degree.  I have watched a couple of astrophotography videos on YouTube that show you how to do it.  You will never go completely side to side.  But, you can take an image that is butting up against one side and stretch it out towards the center quite a bit.


Please post a link to this. And remeber, we are talking in-camera, not in post.


Ah, no.  My mistake.  I was speaking about post processing.  No in the camera.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

"My mistake.  I was speaking about post processing."

 

Yet you can increase the shadow or highlight area in camera with exposure.  Perhaps not the total DR but the apparent DR increase in these ares might help the shot.

 

But Raw files and post editing is the best use for sure.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
Announcements
07/01/2022: New firmware version 1.3.0 is available for PowerShot PICK
06/30/2022: Service Notice: EOS 70D: Error 70 or Error 80
06/10/2022: Service Notice:UPDATE: Canon Inkjet Printer continuous reboot loop or powering down
06/07/2022: New firmware version 1.3.2 is available for PowerShot G7 X Mark III
06/07/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3 is available for EOS M50 Mark II
05/31/2022: Did someone SAY Badges?
05/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.5.1 is available for EOS-C500 Mark II
05/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3.1 is available for EOS-C300 Mark III
05/10/2022: Keep your Canon gear in optimal condition with a Canon Maintenance Service
05/05/2022: We are excited to announce that we have refreshed the ranking scale within the community!
04/26/2022: New firmware version 1.0.1.1 is available for EOS R5 C
03/23/2022: New firmware version 1.0.3.1 is available for EOS-C70
03/16/2022: New firmware version 1.5.2 is available for EOS-R5
03/16/2022: New firmware version 1.5.2 is available for EOS-R6
02/09/2022: Share Your Photos is back!
02/07/2022: New firmware version 1.1.1 is available for EOS-R3
02/07/2022: New firmware version 1.6.1 is available for EOS-1DX Mark III
01/19/2022: READY FOR ANYTHING EOS-R5 C
01/13/2022: Community Update. We will be retiring the legacy profile avatars on 01/20/2022. Click this link to read more.
01/05/2022: Welcome to CES 2022!
12/7/2021: New firmware version 1.3.0 is available for Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x
12/7/2021: New firmware version 1.1.1 is available for CR-N 300
12/7/2021: New firmware version 1.1.1 is available for CR-N 500
12/2/2021: New firmware version 1.1.0 is available for RF 70-200 F4 L IS USM