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EOS R6 Mark II Buffer capacity and ISO relationship

schuey8413
Contributor

I tried searching the forum to see if this has been discussed before but was not able to find anything.

I was messing around with my R6 MKII and noticed that the number of shots stored in the buffer (shooting in continuous) was dependent on the ISO setting, which make sense as higher ISO files are usually larger, and I believe I read somewhere that the ISO setting has a direct effect on the number of shots that can be stored in the buffer.  What I found interesting is when ISO is set to Auto the camera uses the highest ISO set in the ISO speed settings auto range to determine the number of shots stored in the buffer.  I was able to verify this by trying multiple upper limits on the auto range and the buffer size correlated to the ISO that was set manually.  I usually shoot in manual but will use auto ISO to give me an idea of where to set my ISO for a particular environment but have to say I had never paid attention to the buffer storage changing.

Expample: If the auto range is set from 100-200 the buffer size displays 74 (shooting in RAW), but if the auto range is set from 100-51200 the buffer size displays 51.

I am curious if this is common on all R series cameras as dropping from 74 to 51 is a good number of shots.

Have a wonderful day!

Greg

5 REPLIES 5

shadowsports
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Greetings,

I think the specs are based off ISO 100.  I don't know what the buffer is rated at, but I'm sure it fluctuates as you noticed as ISO increases.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


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Waddizzle
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The buffer capacity is only a best guess estimate.  The estimate is based upon a given set of assumptions about FUTURE shooting conditions and exposure settings.  I would regard the estimate as a ceiling, or the maximum number of shots you could expect, not a minimum.

It is a best practice is to never fill the buffer.  Once you do, then the camera will stop capturing photos until the buffer empties.  This pause may take a few seconds and cause you to lose shots.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

schuey8413
Contributor

Thank you for the replies but I don't think the main gist of my post was clearly stated, my apologies.  What I was really trying to address with my post was the fact that when using the auto ISO, the buffer limit is set by the high limit of the ISO auto range.  And I was curious to see if that is the default for the R series cameras and if others are using the auto ISO make them aware of what I am seeing.

Thank you again.


@schuey8413 wrote:

Thank you for the replies but I don't think the main gist of my post was clearly stated, my apologies.  What I was really trying to address with my post was the fact that when using the auto ISO, the buffer limit is set by the high limit of the ISO auto range.  And I was curious to see if that is the default for the R series cameras and if others are using the auto ISO make them aware of what I am seeing.

Thank you again.


It is a behavior common to all cameras, not just the EOS R or any one particular model.

When I am shooting sports or wildlife, I do not think about buffer depth, ISO, or anything of the sort.  I capture short bursts of images, so that I never come close to filling the buffer.  I do not need to check the current buffer display, either.  I never capture a burst that lasts more than a full second or so.

Again, the number one rule is do not full the buffer.  

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

These are very good points and advice.  I appreciate you taking the time to respond.

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