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Do you shoot with your glasses on or off?

John_SD
Whiz

My viewfinder diopter can't compensate adaquately for my near-sighted vision, so I can't get a good adjustment. I finally said the h#@l with it and made the viewfinder adjustment with my glasses on.It's nice and sharp and so I shoot with my glasses on. 

 

You guys who wear glasses, do you take them on and off when you shoot, or just keep them on?

14 REPLIES 14

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

Glasses on.  I would need 11 on the diopter.  My vision is terrible, and getting worse.  I have to use my left eye in the viewfinder.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

I just wear reading glasses but can get by with the diopter at one end of it's adjustment. You can buy corrective Diopters for some of Canon's line up.

 

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Diopters/ci/4661/N/4232860696

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

I do both ways.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@John_SD wrote:

My viewfinder diopter can't compensate adaquately for my near-sighted vision, so I can't get a good adjustment. I finally said the h#@l with it and made the viewfinder adjustment with my glasses on.It's nice and sharp and so I shoot with my glasses on. 

 

You guys who wear glasses, do you take them on and off when you shoot, or just keep them on?


On, because I can't read the LCD screens otherwise. The tricky thing is to make sure that you scan the whole viewfinder, because the glasses may keep your eye so far back that it's difficult to see all of it at once. If I don't remember to look to the right, I sometimes effectively waste the right-hand third of the frame.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

TCampbell
Elite
Elite

You can get dioptric lenses that fit onto the viewfinder to increase the correction for your vision.  These correct for standard near-sighted or far-sighted correction, but don't do cylindrical correction (they don't correct for astigmatism so if you have strong astigmatism you're better off using your prescription glasses.)

 

See:  https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/eos-dioptric-lenses

 

Glasses are pretty much a necessity for me at all times (my eyeglasses aren't just for reading) so if I don't wear glasses, then things are well out of focus when I'm not looking through the camera.  This would put me in a situation where I'm constantly taking the glasses off to shoot, then having to put them on again when I'm not looking through the camera.  That constant take-them-off / put-them-on / take-them-off / put-them-on drives me nuts... so I just leave my glasses on at all times.

 

Once upon a time (when I wasn't buying new glasses) I ran across a product where each lens in the glasses was hinged on the frame.  This allowed you to flip up one lens but leave the other in place.  I'd love a set of glasses to do this for astronomy (when I do visual astronomy, I prefer to remove my glasses -- but again... now I'm constantly having to take the glasses on & off.)  Unfortunately, I don't remember where I saw those frames and I haven't had much luck searching for such a product online.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

Thanks, guys. I was aware there was a stronger dioptic lens that could replace the one the camera comes with, but I rejected that idea for the reason TCampbell and others state: I'd still be putting my glasses on and off all day as I walk around and shoot. Too much hassle and I like to see clearly when I walk around. It's too easy to miss things when your vision is blurry. Thus, I am adapting quickly to shooting with my glasses on. It's not that difficult actually. I guess that everyone who shoots with glasses on has a different "sweet spot" in terms of comfort and visibility due to the shape of their face and glasses. But still not difficult to adapt to. Another problem solved! 🙂


@John_SD wrote:

Thanks, guys. I was aware there was a stronger dioptic lens that could replace the one the camera comes with, but I rejected that idea for the reason TCampbell and others state: I'd still be putting my glasses on and off all day as I walk around and shoot. Too much hassle and I like to see clearly when I walk around. It's too easy to miss things when your vision is blurry. Thus, I am adapting quickly to shooting with my glasses on. It's not that difficult actually. I guess that everyone who shoots with glasses on has a different "sweet spot" in terms of comfort and visibility due to the shape of their face and glasses. But still not difficult to adapt to. Another problem solved! 🙂


I can adjust the diopter to the point where I can see clearly through the viewfinder when I am wearing my glasses.  What drives me nuts is that I have reading glasses, and driving glasses for seeing beyond the end of my arm.

 

Neither pair of eyeglasses is ideally suited for using the camera.  If I wear the driving glasses, then it is hard to read the LCD menus, but I can see very clearly through the viewfinder, except I cannot read the info display very well.  If I wear the reading glasses, then I can read the menus, but I cannot see through the viewfinder as well, except I can read the info display quite easily.

 

AARRGH  [Charlie Brown Yell]

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

I can adjust the diopter to the point where I can see clearly through the viewfinder when I am wearing my glasses.  What drives me nuts is that I have reading glasses, and driving glasses for seeing beyond the end of my arm.

 

Neither pair of eyeglasses is ideally suited for using the camera.  If I wear the driving glasses, then it is hard to read the LCD menus, but I can see very clearly through the viewfinder, except I cannot read the info display very well.  If I wear the reading glasses, then I can read the menus, but I cannot see through the viewfinder as well, except I can read the info display quite easily.

 

AARRGH  [Charlie Brown Yell]


Holy cow. That must be a pain, having to switch between those glasses. But at least you get some measure of visual correction from one pair or another. 

 

The upside of all this is that you must have more glasses in your drawer to choose from than Fred Sanford. 🙂


@John_SD wrote:

@Waddizzle wrote:

I can adjust the diopter to the point where I can see clearly through the viewfinder when I am wearing my glasses.  What drives me nuts is that I have reading glasses, and driving glasses for seeing beyond the end of my arm.

 

Neither pair of eyeglasses is ideally suited for using the camera.  If I wear the driving glasses, then it is hard to read the LCD menus, but I can see very clearly through the viewfinder, except I cannot read the info display very well.  If I wear the reading glasses, then I can read the menus, but I cannot see through the viewfinder as well, except I can read the info display quite easily.

 

AARRGH  [Charlie Brown Yell]


Holy cow. That must be a pain, having to switch between those glasses. But at least you get some measure of visual correction from one pair or another. 

 

The upside of all this is that you must have more glasses in your drawer to choose from than Fred Sanford. 🙂


I don't switch.  Unless I forget to change, I normally use my driving glasses to shoot photographs.  While using the camera involves one compromise or another, at least the "long distance" glasses give me opportunity to better see subjects that I could photograph.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."
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