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DPI

dskolberg
New Contributor

So then when a gallery asks for images of my paintings at 300dpi what do I do.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

TTMartin
Respected Contributor

@dskolberg wrote:

So then when a gallery asks for images of my paintings at 300dpi what do I do.



Unless you are using a flatbed scanner large enough to scan the painting at 300 dpi, don't worry about it.
If you are giving them a photo of the work you are limited by the megapixels of the camera. And then the DPI doesn't matter.

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8 REPLIES 8

Waddizzle
VIP

What post processing software are you using?  You can set a "DPI" value in an image file's metadata.  See Resolution below.

 

PaintDotNet_Resize.PNG

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

I use Gimp and/or zoner


@dskolberg wrote:

I use Gimp and/or zoner


I am not familiar with either one of those.  Perhaps someone who is can help.  I posted an image of a screenshot from the freeware application PaintDOTNet.

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"Doctor told me to get out and walk, so I bought a Canon."

TTMartin
Respected Contributor

@dskolberg wrote:

So then when a gallery asks for images of my paintings at 300dpi what do I do.



Unless you are using a flatbed scanner large enough to scan the painting at 300 dpi, don't worry about it.
If you are giving them a photo of the work you are limited by the megapixels of the camera. And then the DPI doesn't matter.

Peter
Respected Contributor

TTMartin
Respected Contributor

@Peter wrote:
Image>scale image.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=8S2cnZ2QR70

They are half tone DOTS, not spots. Because, half tone dots were created using an analog process (photographically through an actual physical screen) and existed long before printer dots came into play. 

 

ebiggs1
Forum Elite

DPI stands for Dots Per Inch. DPI is often misused. If someone says they want a photo that is 300 dpi what they really mean is they want 300 PPI.

 A digital photo has no PPI (or DPI).   PPI only happens when the photo is printed.


The resolution of a digital photo is in pixels or commonly MP.  To further complicate this most modern software like PS and LR and Gimp use 300 DPI to refer as a high resolution photo.  They all have a menu where this can be set.  It is found in the Printer Settings.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

kvbarkley
Honored Contributor

Do the calculation. If the image is 10 x 12, then the image needs to be 3000 x 3600 pixels (the number of inches x the dpi).

 

If you have really large canvases you might have to take multiple pictures and mrege them for 300 dpi.