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Canon EOS 4000D Camera Lenses

CariY2206
Contributor

Hi! So, I have a Canon EOS 4000D at home. However, I've been blessed with the opportunity to take professional photos with different cameras at my church. When I first purchased the EOS 4000D, I did it with little knowledge because I was excited to own my first camera. However, the picture quality between both cameras is drastically different, regardless of the settings. I learned from one of my colleagues that the camera body doesn't matter, but the lens does. Therefore, I am wondering what other lenses will be good for the Canon EOS 4000D, other than the zoom lens that came with the camera (the EF-S 18-55mm lens). All the pictures look grainy with that lens in comparison to the photos I take at church. Additionally, which adapter would be good to purchase with this camera as well because I don't desire to be limited in my lens usage.

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Great to get your prompt response!

Let's start off assuming you want to keep the 4000d for a while but want better glass.

There are two lenses that I would recommend off the bat.  The first is the Canon EF-S 18-135 IS STM or (nano) USM lens.  This is a brilliant general purpose lens with a much wider range than your 18-55.  The STM and nano-USM units focus using fly-by-wire technology that makes the virtually silent and can be manually focused at any time.  The USM unit is a bit faster than the STM but optically very similar - I have both.

The following images were taken with the  EF-S18-135 STM, hand-held, in available light:
005.jpg

Bee on a flower 01.jpg

At the long end, for the investment, I would recommend getting the EF 70-300 lenses.  There are a couple of variants of this the original (released in 2005) and a new one, MkII in about 2016.  Again, I have both and they are both excellent optically, although the MkII has the nano-USM motor and is blazing fast at focus.  Both versions of this lens are image stabilized and if you decide to upgrade to a FF body, they will work with those bodies.  I have also tried them via an adapter on the new R-series FF bodies and they work very well.

I recommend you read my review of 70-300 lenses HERE   If you are interested, you could look on Canon's refurbished lens site as they are like new, significantly reduced in price and come with a 1-year warranty.  You can access that site HERE 

If you eventually want to move up to a higher-end body, there are two paths to follow:

Stay with a DSLR and take advantage of low prices for refurb and second-hand gear as enthusiasts relinquish their gear and move into mirrorless.  In that case I would look for the EOS 80D or 90D.  Either should work for your purposes - again, I have both and they are both great bodies.

Alternatively, you could eventually upgrade into the new R-series mirrorless interchangeable lens system (MILCs).  That is a fast-developing market with excellent FF and a couple of crop sensor bodies.  While a crop-sensor body has advantages for wildlife, a FF body has advantages at the wide end and for portraiture.

However, I would suggest the lenses first.  The EF-S lens would work on the R7 and R10 MILC bodies and the 70-300 would work well on any MILC body.  (Technically, the EF-S lens can work on a FF MILC body, but it massively reduces the sensor output and I would not recommend that).


cheers, TREVOR

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

View solution in original post

A good point, although I am not sure of the price for this - isn't it an L lens and thus pretty pricey?  I am trying to respect the OP's budget constraints. 

If the need to shoot in church without a tripod or flash is a necessity (although this was not listed),  in that case I would go for the EF-S 17-55 f/2.8, it is arguably the best EF-S lens out there with a constant 2.8 aperture and one can pick them up fairly cheaply these days.  I have one: big and bulky but a killer lens.  It could work well with the 70-300 range to give a lot of flexibility and yet not break the bank.


cheers, TREVOR

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

View solution in original post

11 REPLIES 11

Tronhard
Elite

Hi and welcome to the forum:

Actually, the camera body does count.  The combination of lens and body, in particular the sensor, is a system: and that system is only as good as the weakest link.  Grain, or noise, is a function of the sensor not getting enough light for the exposure. 

However, if you want to stick with the same camera body, then we can suggest some lenses that may give you more flexibility.

We have not a lot of context to go with. 

First of all it would be helpful to get some kind of number for your budget - we can cheerfully suggest lenses that will cost you several thousand dollars, but if you don't want to spend that kind of money then we are wasting everyone's time.

The next thing to identify is what kinds of subjects you intend to shoot.  That has implications for the lens in particular.  Examples would be portraits, landscapes, close-ups of insects, wild animals.  Each of these leans towards a different kind of lens.

Next, what do you intend to produce?   There is a significant difference between wanting images to go on-line and social media, or to digital devices, vs large, high-resolution prints.

What are you prepared to carry.? If, for example, you want to shoot wild animals (say birds or bears) in particular, some of those lenses are very bulky and heavy.  A good rule is the best camera (and lens) is the one you are prepared to carry.


cheers, TREVOR

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

Hi! Thank you for the welcome and your reply!

Thank you so much for your information. It makes a lot of sense! Now that you mention it, the EOS 4000D is not as technologically advanced as the canon's I've been blessed to work with at church. I have found that this camera does well with nature photos, but not as well with people. However, I desire to do portraits, as that is what I do professionally. My nature photography is more of a personal leisurely pleasure.

The photos I intend to produce will go online, on social media, and on phones as well, LORD willing.

As for my budget, I would prefer to not spend several thousands of dollars on a lens right now. What is the best lens I could get for several hundreds of dollars for the EOS 4000D? Additionally, what would be the best camera body I could get for portraits right now (i.e., family photography, individual photo sessions, event photography, etc.), regardless of price?

Great to get your prompt response!

Let's start off assuming you want to keep the 4000d for a while but want better glass.

There are two lenses that I would recommend off the bat.  The first is the Canon EF-S 18-135 IS STM or (nano) USM lens.  This is a brilliant general purpose lens with a much wider range than your 18-55.  The STM and nano-USM units focus using fly-by-wire technology that makes the virtually silent and can be manually focused at any time.  The USM unit is a bit faster than the STM but optically very similar - I have both.

The following images were taken with the  EF-S18-135 STM, hand-held, in available light:
005.jpg

Bee on a flower 01.jpg

At the long end, for the investment, I would recommend getting the EF 70-300 lenses.  There are a couple of variants of this the original (released in 2005) and a new one, MkII in about 2016.  Again, I have both and they are both excellent optically, although the MkII has the nano-USM motor and is blazing fast at focus.  Both versions of this lens are image stabilized and if you decide to upgrade to a FF body, they will work with those bodies.  I have also tried them via an adapter on the new R-series FF bodies and they work very well.

I recommend you read my review of 70-300 lenses HERE   If you are interested, you could look on Canon's refurbished lens site as they are like new, significantly reduced in price and come with a 1-year warranty.  You can access that site HERE 

If you eventually want to move up to a higher-end body, there are two paths to follow:

Stay with a DSLR and take advantage of low prices for refurb and second-hand gear as enthusiasts relinquish their gear and move into mirrorless.  In that case I would look for the EOS 80D or 90D.  Either should work for your purposes - again, I have both and they are both great bodies.

Alternatively, you could eventually upgrade into the new R-series mirrorless interchangeable lens system (MILCs).  That is a fast-developing market with excellent FF and a couple of crop sensor bodies.  While a crop-sensor body has advantages for wildlife, a FF body has advantages at the wide end and for portraiture.

However, I would suggest the lenses first.  The EF-S lens would work on the R7 and R10 MILC bodies and the 70-300 would work well on any MILC body.  (Technically, the EF-S lens can work on a FF MILC body, but it massively reduces the sensor output and I would not recommend that).


cheers, TREVOR

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

Ooooh! This is all great information!!! Thank you so much for your prompt feedback, and for the links you provided as well!!!

No problem.  If you need to shoot in extremely dark conditions, you will come down to the limits of the sensor again, so using a tripod or some other support device would be useful.  I added the option to look for a EF-S 17-55 USM f/2.8 lens, to help with this but all systems have their limit.


cheers, TREVOR

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

Thank you! This is great! Unfortunately, I cannot shoot with a tripod at this moment as I have to keep moving constantly to get as many shots as possible, but I will look into the variation of the lenses you recommended, LORD willing.

rs-eos
Authority

Church interiors can be dark, so I'd highly recommend a lens with an f/2.8 or wider aperture.  That will let you lower the ISO and/or increase shutter speed.  Perhaps look at the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 lens.

 

--
Ricky

EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L, 600EX-RT (x6), ST-E3-RT
EOS C70, RF 24-70 f/2.8L IS, EF-EOS R 0.71x

A good point, although I am not sure of the price for this - isn't it an L lens and thus pretty pricey?  I am trying to respect the OP's budget constraints. 

If the need to shoot in church without a tripod or flash is a necessity (although this was not listed),  in that case I would go for the EF-S 17-55 f/2.8, it is arguably the best EF-S lens out there with a constant 2.8 aperture and one can pick them up fairly cheaply these days.  I have one: big and bulky but a killer lens.  It could work well with the 70-300 range to give a lot of flexibility and yet not break the bank.


cheers, TREVOR

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

Both of the things you listed here are true. I shoot without a tripod and without flash in a very dark environment.

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