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Canon 5D Mark III Inconsistent Slightly Out of Focus Images

tairyu23
Apprentice

Hi! I've been shooting on the Canon 5D Mark III for about four years now. I've had the same problem these past several years where subjects are sometimes slightly out of focus. Especially when doing event work, it's rare to get truly sharp photos. Screenshot 2024-05-07 at 12.52.14 AM.pngScreenshot 2024-05-07 at 12.53.17 AM.png

I usually shoot around around F2.8~F8 ... 1/250 ... ISO100~500.

For the sample images here were the settings: 1/5000 F4 ISO1000

Here are my AF Settings: 

61 Points, Spot AF.

Is there a sensor issue? I use multiple lenses and they all have this issue. I've attached photo examples below! Thank you so much for your time 🙂

3 REPLIES 3

deebatman316
Elite
Elite

Your pictures lacks EXIF (metadata). What are your settings what lens did you use. What focus mode and drive mode did you use so we can better assist you. 


-Demetrius

Current Gear: EOS 5D Mark IV, EF F/2.8 Trinity, EF 50mm F/1.8 STM, EF 85mm F/1.8 USM, 470EX-AI & 600EX II-RT

Retired Gear: EOS 40D

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

“ Hi! I've been shooting on the Canon 5D Mark III for about four years now. I've had the same problem these past several years where subjects are sometimes slightly out of focus. Especially when doing event work, it's rare to get truly sharp photos. “

Simple answer. Move closer.  Don’t crop.  You have cropped the image far to much to expect a tack sharp image.  It is better to get it right in the camera, than to correct it in post.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

Hi and welcome to the forum:
Honestly it's not possible to get all the information that we need to do a decent analysis off a screenshot, it's already degraded.   The best thing to do if you want help is to post the RAW image via a link to some file sharing program.
Just looking at your image without more data, even not identifying the lens used in this case is not helping us to help you.  F/4 on a 24mm lens is going to have a significantly different DoF compared to f/4 on a 200mm lens.  Looking at the distance to subject and assessing that along with your angle of shot, I would be interested to know what your focus point was.
As far as the sample image and supplied incomplete associated data go, I see no logic in have a 1/5000 shutter speed and an ISO of 1000.  You want to reduce your ISO as much as possible, so something like 1/600sec would give you an ISO of 125.  Even 1/1200 would be a much less noisy ISO of 250.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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