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Lens Fungus Prevention Best Practices

danimal59
Contributor

Good Morning,

I recently purchased a T7 kit as well as two additional lenses. I live in Western Pennsylvania and store my equipment in a LowePro bag.

The other night in the Canon Community I came across some posts about lens fungus and I have been trying to educate myself about  what I should be doing to best protect my equipment. 

Specifically I have read about people storing their lenses in plastic bags with silica gel packs and some going as far as purchasing Ruggard  humidity controlled dry cabinets.

I wanted to see if members here may have some suggestions so that I can find the best solution for my needs.

Thank you,

Dan

12 REPLIES 12

As I understand it, the issue was more about how the lenses should be stored rather than how they are used in the field, although, to be thorough, I covered both to a degree. 

If one lives in a house that is prone to moisture and the elements, then there could be concerns.  That said, if it's that likely to impact the lenses with fungus, it's not likely to be good for human habitation - something that has been an issue in NZ where houses were, for a long time, very poorly insulated and many in lower socio-economic areas still are.   I know when we moved to the current house, with it's very much improved environment, the occurrence of colds and other cardio-respiratory issues dropped to almost zero.


cheers, TREVOR

Before you ask us, have you looked in the manual or on the Canon Support Site?
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

"That said, if it's that likely to impact the lenses with fungus, it's not likely to be good for human habitation ..."

Good point, Trevor. 😮

"...  the issue was more about how the lenses should be stored rather than how they are used ..."

However, how the gear is used dictates how it should be handled as one puts it away. Even if it is just a quick wipe down with a micro fiber cloth. It is important and I know camera is not cheap, but keep it in perspective. It is only a lens. Use it, enjoy it and don't fret or worry over it, to much. Reasonable care will suffice in most situations.

I know the OP didn't like my first advice but its not logical to spend a lot of money on preventive measures for  something that can be replaced so readily if the worst happens.

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

In NZ we have a legacy of leaky and poorly insulated homes - it was really only until about the end of the last century that double-glazing and comprehensive insulation were mandatory.  Now heat pumps are required on all rentals and new builds as well. 

I fully accept that I am very conservative in my care of my gear, and have clearly said so, but I was brought up with the motto "take care of your gear and it will take care of you".   Doing so does not, in any way diminish my enjoyment of actually using it - it it's pouring with rain, I'm not going to be comfortable in it any more than the camera will. 🙂 

As always there is a spectrum of views on the subject, but at least the OP is getting a range of opinions and that is good.


cheers, TREVOR

Before you ask us, have you looked in the manual or on the Canon Support Site?
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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