cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

100-400 mk2 vs sigma 150-600

paulbrogden10
Enthusiast

Hi all been thinking about the sigmas 150-600 both s and c vs 100-400 mk2 any comments the sigmas are cheaper and have much longer reach.

 

sigma c 150-600 £750

sigma s  150-600 £1200

Canon 100-400 mk2 £1400-1700

 

The sigma c seems a bargin dont it?

47 REPLIES 47

"I have the Sigma 120-300 f/2.8 and use a 2X TC with it very successfully."

 

I also have the 120-300 but I prefer the SIgma 1.4x on it.  It is a real nice combo.  One of the rare places where a tele converter works.  Works out to approx, 170-420mm @ f4.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA

"There are, after all, such things as constant-aperture zooms"

 

But we are not talking constant aperture lenses.  Are we?  So that statement is moot.

 

If the measurements are made at full aperture, say 150mm @ f5 than at 151mm it will not be f5.  It may be f5.0000001 but it will not be f5.  It may not be linear either.  You can't increase the focal length without increasing the other.

 

Feeling persnickety this morning Robert?

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

B from B

A constant aperture lens changes magnification just in the front lens element.  So it can maintain a constant f ratio.  The entrance pupil increases its diameter because of the magnification change as you zoom.  The aperture diameter remains constant,  thus keeping the f ratio constant.

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

I decided to buy all three because every one online was telling me different storys. Lets not forget Tony Northup videos on youtube would contradict himself on later videos. I tested them out in the field and in my home in my home studio. I concluded while I liked the tamron the most due to its design and I liked its tripod mount a lot I found at 600mm is was far to soft for my needs.

 

After testing the sigma C I noticed both the S and C was very similar in quality in fact when it comes to the photograph I could not tell them apart between 150mm-500mm in fact it seemed the C was a bit better. However once I started looking at the 600mm end I noticed the sport was only slightly sharper and only slight so slight alot of people would not be able to tell the difference. 

 

In the end I decided to go with the Sigma C because it was very close to the sport in image quality and over 1KG in weight lighter. I thought I could carry two cameras instead of one  very big lens.

 

I have also come to a conclusion which is casing me alot of un-sureness. As you guys know I did own the canon 100-400II grey import. I was convinced some thing was wrong with it but when I tested another copy in store focus was still slow. camera used 7D and 600D. After much research I have come to the conclusion that it is possible their was nothing wrong with the lens. I have learned that some cameras may not be delivering enough power to the auto focus motor. This also would account for the battery's not lasting very long when I used the lens. This also means the critics who defended the lens may be right to do so.

 

I did see a video of a 1DX using the lens and the auto focus was like 3 times faster than my combo. I really think canon should have addressed this issue. So I hope my findings help some people out their. It seems budget cameras or older cameras body's may not be up to the task of using this lens at its full potential.

 

It is worth noting that when testing the auto focus speeds on the 7D on all three 150-600mm lenses I did not notice any speed slow down compaired to other videos I had watched.

 

Some people have said that the 150-600mm lenses are not sharp lenses. I dont agree it depends how you use the lens getting closer to your subject can make the worse lens the best.


@paulbrogden10 wrote:

 

 

I have also come to a conclusion which is casing me alot of un-sureness. As you guys know I did own the canon 100-400II grey import. I was convinced some thing was wrong with it but when I tested another copy in store focus was still slow. camera used 7D and 600D. After much research I have come to the conclusion that it is possible their was nothing wrong with the lens. I have learned that some cameras may not be delivering enough power to the auto focus motor. This also would account for the battery's not lasting very long when I used the lens. This also means the critics who defended the lens may be right to do so.

 

 


That is the reason I use a battery grip with dual batteries with both my 7D and 7D Mk II and larger lenses, either the Sigma 120-300 f/2.8, Sigma 150-500 OS or the Canon 100-400 IS II.

 

There are reviews that say the Sigma 120-300 f/2.8 DG HSM (non-OS) is slow to focus, but, by using the battery grip with it, I didn't find that to be an issue.

 

 

TTmartin I was using battery grips on both cameras when testing these lenses has any one out their exsperienced very slow focus with the 7D on the 100-400II?


@paulbrogden10 wrote:

TTmartin I was using battery grips on both cameras when testing these lenses has any one out their exsperienced very slow focus with the 7D on the 100-400II?


Were they genuine Canon grips or 3rd party grips?

 

In theory it shouldn't make a difference. But, as we know 'In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. But, in practice, there is.'

I only use orginal canon ones


@paulbrogden10 wrote:

I only use orginal canon ones


There are a few factors that can determine how long your batteries last. 

 

Cold temperatures are not good for long battery life.

Lots of focusing in AI Servo mode can shorten battery life.

The constant activity of the IS motors can shorten battery life.

Extended use of the LCD screen [reviewing images and historgrams] shorten battery life.

 

No doubt there are more, but that's what popped into my head as I devour my lunch. [Pizza, spinach and garlic]

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:
The constant activity of the IS motors can shorten battery life.

 


I do use Mode 3 IS with my EF 100-400 L IS II, I'm not sure if that has a positive impact on battery life or not.

Avatar
click here to view the gallery
Announcements