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100-400 mk2 vs sigma 150-600

paulbrogden10
Enthusiast

Hi all been thinking about the sigmas 150-600 both s and c vs 100-400 mk2 any comments the sigmas are cheaper and have much longer reach.

 

sigma c 150-600 £750

sigma s  150-600 £1200

Canon 100-400 mk2 £1400-1700

 

The sigma c seems a bargin dont it?

47 REPLIES 47


@Waddizzle wrote:

"I did see a video of a 1DX using the lens and the auto focus was like 3 times faster than my combo. I really think canon should have addressed this issue."

 

I believe that Canon addressed that issue years ago.  It's called a battery grip.


You make a valid point. But truthfully, I've never seen that advertised as an advantage of a battery grip. The BG is usually billed as a way to shoot more pictures without having to change the battery, rather than a way to maintain sufficient current flow through the autofocus motor. I've never been a great fan of battery grips, feeling that the longer time between battery changes didn't justify the additional size and weight. But if I had a large lens that I thought was focusing too slowly, I might feel differently now.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

"You make a valid point. But truthfully, I've never seen that advertised as an advantage of a battery grip."
Honesty, I have never seen them advertised that way either. Usually it's all about having the buttons for portrait mode.
Batteries are capable of outputting only so much maxium current per unit of time.  The larger the load, the more the source voltage drops when the load is being fed.  The more the source voltage drops, then more current must be delivered to maintain a given power level of power being delivered.  An inadequate source of battery power is a downward spiral until it discharges itself.

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:
"You make a valid point. But truthfully, I've never seen that advertised as an advantage of a battery grip."
Honesty, I have never seen them advertised that way either. Usually it's all about having the buttons for portrait mode.
Batteries are capable of outputting only so much maximum current per unit of time.  The larger the load, the more the source voltage drops when the load is being fed.  The more the source voltage drops, then more current must be delivered to maintain a given power level of power being delivered.  An inadequate source of battery power is a downward spiral until it discharges itself.

 

 


Exactly, a battery grip puts two batteries in parallel. So when a load is applied there is less voltage drop since the load is applied across both batteries, instead of just to one.

 

 

I use battery grips on my cameras all the time.


@paulbrogden10 wrote:

I use battery grips on my cameras all the time.


"Don't lose focus, Guys. Battery life isn't the issue, is it? It's the ability (or not) of a single unassisted camera battery to supply enough current to drive a large lens's autofocus motor at its rated speed."

 

I do believe that the OP said that he does use a battery grip.  I do not know Paul experiences slow performance right out the gate, or not.  I think he has said in past posts that he has changed to new batteries. 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

There is something unique, and out of the ordinary, about his experiences with large lenses.  I have found that the 100-400 mk2 focuses very quickly, provided I use it effectively.  Using the wrong AF mode can give you sluggish AF performance.  I don't know if it is my imagination, but the lens does seem to acquire a target and lock focus faster in One Shot mode, compared to AI Servo.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@paulbrogden10 wrote:

Canon 100-400II is around 383mm at its 400 mark, at 5.6

 


From 'The Digital Picture'
'...the Tamron's longest focal length is more like a 570mm lens (95% of 600mm).'
'...The two Sigma zooms frame the test chart at a similarly-slightly shorter distance than the Tamron, bringing the rough focal length estimate down to slightly under 560mm.'

 

I am not supprized since the canon is around 383mm not the advertised 400mm

TTMartin
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I'm using my 100-400 II on a 7D Mk  II, if I get a chance sometime I'll compare the focus speed between the classic 7D and the Mk II

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