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yellow cast to color prints even in the border areas

lisarundell
Occasional Contributor

We have a new Pixma Pro 100 printer and have had an issue with a yellow cast being printed on color images.  It is even printing in the white borders.  The intensity of yellow has varied from so strong the image can't be used to barely noticable.  Any ideas as to what the issue is?

16 REPLIES 16

Davy
Super Contributor

How new is the printer?

If its brand new have you done a head alignment? It certainly shouldn't be printing in the border unless it's a driver or a setting issue.

 

Your best bet is to get onto Canon support either by telephone or Email or if straight out the box be getting a replacement from the place of purchase.

 

Dave

 

 

lisarundell
Occasional Contributor
Thank you for the info. The printer we have had the printer just about 6 weeks. Chris did an alignment when he set it up. I just remembered that the first 4 images were clean. One had a really strong yellow cast and the others have been very faint. I'll contact Canon today.

lisarundell
Occasional Contributor
Dave thank you for your reply. After talking to tech support the fix seems to be as easy as using Canon Print Studio Pro. I'm hoping this does it, just a little Leary since the first 5 prints were good using Ps to print from. A few more prints and we will know... Thanks again!

I am in agreement with Canon tech.

That is likely a user error. A setting in PS or PSP.  You don't need PSP to print but you do need to make sure PS is set up correctly.  Do you know how?  You must set PS as the controlling unit and not let the Pro-100 controll anything.  You do this in My Printer.  Do you know how?

 

If you need instructions let me know.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

lisarundell
Occasional Contributor

Hi thank you for your response.  I do not know how to set up the color management in Canon print studio pro.  When printing from Ps the option to let Ps manage the color is in the dialog box.  I would very much appreciate assistance in setting it up.  

You are not alone.. This question has been asked many times so I made a reply that pretty much tells how I do it.  I hope it works for you too.  Read below;

 

You can not set the printer to match the monitor.  You must set the monitor to match the printer.

 

First, you must not let the printer set anything.  Turn off every bit off control it has.  You can do this with the Canon My Printer under the Printer Settings tab.  Do you know how?  I will guess, yes, for now but if you don't get back to me.  See the next post.

 

Second, you need to have your photo editor (like Photoshop) handle all the print settings and color matching.  You know how to do this? I prefer Photoshop and I use AdobeRGB color space.

 

And lastly, it is essential you get some settings on your monitor that somewhat matches what the printer is printing.  Your printer may be doing exactly what you are telling it to do and you have no idea it is, because your monitor is so far off.  If you don't do this step, you can forget the other steps.  However, there are only a few things that you need to be concerned with. You don't need any fancy extra add-on to do this.  No additional software or gadgets, etc.  No monkeys, no spiders, nothing!

Most people set their monitors too bright.

 

You must get the gray-scale very close.  You need to get the brightness very close and you need the contrast very close.

 

After you do these things you can make adjustments to your prints by just looking at your screen.  Because you know the monitor and printer are on the same level.  One more point, you can NOT get a printer to print every color exactly the way you see it.  It isn't possible as all colors and adjustments effect all others.  My goal is to get the skin tones right.  That is what people notice most. Remember you are dealing with two different disciplines here.  One is colored light and the other is colored dyes.  They are not the same thing.

 

For instance, I know my Pro-100 tends to print slightly darker than what I see on the monitor (typical).  So, I automatically know to set it's prints 1/2 to one stop brighter in Photoshop, in my case.  It also prints with a slightly warn tone.  Most of the time, with portraits especially, this if OK but sometimes it is not.  In that case I adjust the "temp" setting slightly cooler in PS.

 

All the Canon photo printers I have ever seen have this warm/magenta cast.  Canon engineers must prefer this look.  It can not be changed.  You need to "fix" it in post.

 

Make sure you have the correct ICC profiles and you are using Canon brand ink and paper until you get good with the printer.  Very, very important, otherwise you don't know if the printer is doing exactly what you are telling it to or not.

 

Important is, use the USB connection until everything is right.  You are just adding another issue when you try to set up the printing and the wireless all at the same time.  Just like using Canon branded products until it is a go.  Use a real printer USB cable.  Not just any old USB cable. Get everything right before you explore.

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

100-1.jpg

100-1a.jpg

100-2.jpg

 

After you click the Manual button, click on the Set tab.

 

100-4.jpg

100-5.jpg

 

Click OK.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

100-6.jpg

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

the_traveler
Frequent Contributor

While the last suggestion was quite extensive, this one sentence

 

You can not set the printer to match the monitor.  You must set the monitor to match the printer.

 

is counter to the instructions of every single authority in the world on this point.

 

Setting your monitor to match your printer means:

 

  • If you send your images to anyone else who uses a calibrated monitor they won't see a quality image.
  • If you send a file out to be printed, the printer won't know what it really looks like,
  • If you get another printer, you'll have to change you monitor,
  • If you use two color printers, what will you do then.

There is an industry making monitor calibrators and every reputable photo-related site I have ever seen considers monitor calibration a must.

 

A search on Do I Need to Calibrate my Monitor brings back a huge number of responses

 

 

Don't take my word for it, read a bunch and see what they say:

 

calibrate.jpg