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Want to photograph Neowise?

ebiggs1
Legend

 

Want to photograph comet Neowise?  Here is how I would do it and I might if the sky clears. Whether stars will trail in your photo or not, depends on the 500 rule.  It says 500 divided by the focal length of the lens equals the exposure time to keep stars sharp.  

I.E. 18mm / 500=33.3 seconds, 50mm / 500=10 seconds.  This is a general rule because not all DSLRs have the same size sensor.

 

Your camera needs to have a manual mode.  You can focus, use manual focus, on any bright star because when any star is in focus all stars are in focus. Even comets!

 

You do not need a telephoto lens!  Matter of fact you can get great comet and landscape pictures using a wide-angle lens.

The standard kit lens that comes with many cameras, the 18-55mm is fine. Try different focal lengths. Use fairly long exposures like 10-20-30 seconds and ISO 1600 or 3200. Keep the 500 Rule in mind. You will need a tripod.

 

Make sure you “bracket”. This means try different exposure settings.

 

You can get a close-up of the comet’s tail. But for close ups you do need a telephoto lens.  For instance, a 300mm lens would be great. It needs shorter exposures, however, like 2 or 3 seconds at perhaps ISO 3200 to get detailed pictures.  These are basic settings, try several and happy star gazing.

 

You can find Neowise in the lower northwest sky.  But you really do need to get to a dark sky place away fro any bright lights.

Some can see it naked eye but binoculars are best so take them along, too.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
29 REPLIES 29

Peter
Authority
Took some pictures of it last night. Both at 600mm and 17mm. Stacked in Siril but it seems that I should have taken more pictures and also some dark frames. Stars, planets and comets are not what I normally take pictures of.

Barely visible without binoculars.


@Peter wrote:
Took some pictures of it last night. Both at 600mm and 17mm. Stacked in Siril but it seems that I should have taken more pictures and also some dark frames. Stars, planets and comets are not what I normally take pictures of.

Barely visible without binoculars.

Use an ISO set at 800 to 1600.  This seems to be the sweet spot for most Canon sensors.  At least it was a few years ago.  The best thing you can do to improve your shots is to use shutter lockup, and a remote shutter release.  

 

Having a very robust tripod helps, especially if there are any breezes blowing through the treezes.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

@Peter wrote:
Took some pictures of it last night. Both at 600mm and 17mm. Stacked in Siril but it seems that I should have taken more pictures and also some dark frames. Stars, planets and comets are not what I normally take pictures of.

Barely visible without binoculars.

Use an ISO set at 800 to 1600.  This seems to be the sweet spot for most Canon sensors.  At least it was a few years ago.  The best thing you can do to improve your shots is to use shutter lockup, and a remote shutter release.  

 

Having a very robust tripod helps, especially if there are any breezes blowing through the treezes.


From that night. Used remote shutter release and ISO between ISO 200-6400. 6400 was too much even stacked.

 

 

 

r_pp_Karla_stacked.jpg

Neo-6400_stacked.jpg

"The best thing you can do to improve your shots is to use shutter lockup, and a remote shutter release."

 

When you have exposure times in the 10 to 20 to 30 seconds range shutter lockup isn't much of a problem let alone the best thing you can do.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"The best thing you can do to improve your shots is to use shutter lockup, and a remote shutter release."

 

When you have exposure times in the 10 to 20 to 30 seconds range shutter lockup isn't much of a problem let alone the best thing you can do.


I would disagree with that opinion.  Motion blur from the shutter may bet averaged out to some degree.  But, when you are capturing faint amounts of light, and then stacking images, it becomes more significant than you suggest.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

"Motion blur from the shutter may bet averaged out to some degree"

 

Of course everybody has their own way of shooting but the. I hope it works for but it isn't necessary or by far the "best" thing you can do.  Most micro vibrations from a shutter will go unnoticed with a 10 second exposure let alone a 20 or 30 second.  On short shutter times I am right there with ya!

 

Super cloudy here matter of fact it is raining. No Neowise for me. Smiley Sad

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Waddizzle
Legend

"You can find Neowise in the lower northwest sky.  But you really do need to get to a dark sky place away fro any bright lights.

Some can see it naked eye but binoculars are best so take them along, too."

 

The NYC tri-state area has been blanketed with cloud cover since June.  No photo ops, none.  There may have been one or two during the wee hours of the night when I had to rise and fly at 5am.  Opportunities have been slim to none.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

"The NYC tri-state area has been blanketed with cloud cover ..."

 

I hear ya!  So has Kansas but it cleared up a bit tonight.

 

_OS12003-Pano-Edit.jpg

 

I caught a meteor and Neowise in this three shot pano. Smiley Happy  EOS 1DX, 24mm, f4, 10 sec, ISO 3200.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

_OS11982.jpg

 

EOS 1DX and EF 300mm f4L prime lens. 300mm @ f4, 8 sec, ISO 1600.  * seconds is a bit too long for a 300mm telephoto sl some star trails are present.  Notice the colors.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!
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